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My first engine rebuild (K-241)


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#1 Joe Knife OFFLINE  

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Posted March 19, 2017 - 06:37 PM

A couple years ago I recovered my grandfather's 1967 Ford 100 from his barn (before it was demolished) and brought it home. I've just recently started working on it in earnest. My thread for the tractor resto is here: http://gardentractor...62-my-ford-100/

 

Honestly I went into this project hoping the engine would start and run without much effort, only because it "ran when parked" in 2001. I thought about hooking up a battery and trying it, even. I could turn the flywheel by hand and it felt smooth. 

 

Today I finally got to looking into the engine and I'm REALLY glad I didn't try to start and run it!

 

IMG_5043.JPG IMG_5046.JPG

 

IMG_5050.JPG IMG_5056.JPG

 

(These pics are upright on my PC but sideways here, not sure why)

 

I've never worked on an engine before (at least, not the inside). About all I know is what I've seen in a couple isavetractors videos on YouTube. My intention is to update this thread as I go, I'm sure I'll have questions and learn a lot.

 

Where I'm at right now is, can't get the screws off the flywheel screen. I'll try for a couple more days and then I'll drill them out--I guess I could then just re-tap as needed right?


Edited by Joe Knife, March 19, 2017 - 06:37 PM.

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#2 Gtractor ONLINE  

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Posted March 19, 2017 - 06:46 PM

You need an "impact driver" to get those screws lose.  HF Tools has-em for about $5 but they usually break the tips right quick.

Best of luck on your rebuild!  Looking forward to following along.


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#3 stiemmy OFFLINE  

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Posted March 19, 2017 - 06:47 PM

The deal is with an engine that sits, is will it turn over by hand, either way, great score!!!!!

#4 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted March 19, 2017 - 07:03 PM

We are all in this together. Ask questions before making mistakes. First, be patient. This is going to be a learning experience that will be rewarding when it is done. The first thing you should do is soak those screws with PB Blaster. Then soak all other fasteners. It may take a week or more for it to loosen the screws, be patient. You do not want to mess with the flywheel because you might messup the balance.

Next, download the Kohler Manual from our Manuals Section and read it cover to cover. I suggest reading the Briggs and Stratton Repairmans' Manual too.

Now with an idea of what you are getting into, do you really want to do this? If you still want to proceed, decide how much you want to do yourself and how much you want to have done at a machine shop. Look at the cost of the services from the machine shop and the cost of tools that you will need.

At this point I may have overwhelmed you but I want you to realize that it takes time and money. I've got a bunch of Kohlers waiting for me to rebuild them. Parts cost me $150 to $200 each engine and I invested alot of money in tools years ago. I get alot of satisfaction rebuilding engines and machines but I realized that that is a personal taste. I hope that you want to do this but you must decide. If you can wait a few months, you may be able to pickup parts and tools at swap meets for low prices. Good Luck, Rick
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#5 LilysDad ONLINE  

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Posted March 19, 2017 - 07:11 PM

I agree with Rick, get a Kohler Manual They are great! They list everything step by step taking it apart and putting it back together. A s for tool, Auto Zone loans out some of those tools you may only use once; cylinder hone, ring compressors and such. If​ you have a good understanding of mechanics, I recommend you do it once. You'll be proud of yourself when you get it done.


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#6 dodge trucker ONLINE  

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Posted March 19, 2017 - 07:54 PM

Looks like the k301 that I just pulled from the Cub 1200 that I have had sitting behind my garage since last summer. Mouse house galore and blown head gasket too.

#7 Bolens 1000 ONLINE  

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Posted March 20, 2017 - 06:41 AM

Looks like your off to a good start so far lots of great guys here to help.

If you want a hard copy I stock the kohler K series service and repair manuals , new

 

http://bolenspartsan...-manual-tp2379/


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#8 Joe Knife OFFLINE  

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Posted March 20, 2017 - 08:09 AM

Thanks for the encouragement guys. Yeah I'm in no hurry (A 16-yo John Deere does the bulk of the work today so this mower will be a backup when it is done). I hope to rent / borrow the more expensive tools that might be needed. I do have a cylinder hone from rebuilding the airpack on my M35A2, but I realize that's not much.

 

One little victory last night, I was able to remove the spark plug without damaging the head cover. It was very seized but once I got it to budge about 1/8 turn I just kept working it back and forth with Deep Creep shots in between until I was able to turn it 1/4, 1/2, and finally full turns to remove it.

 

Been looking at the fuel pump and although mine seems to be working, I see plastic replacements for ~$30. I'd like to rebuild and keep using the metal original but I don't see any rebuild kits. Looks like it has a diaphragm inside that would need replaced. I've also seen people replace them with a vacuum-driven pump by fabbing an adapter. I'd rather stay close to original on this but I'm open to suggestions.


Edited by Joe Knife, March 20, 2017 - 12:35 PM.

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#9 Achto OFFLINE  

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Posted March 20, 2017 - 01:27 PM

http://www.then-now-...r-fuel-pumps-2/ Here is a place to try for Kohler metal body pump rebuild kits. I've used these kits with great success.


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#10 Trav1s ONLINE  

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Posted March 22, 2017 - 07:37 AM

Great to see another person take on the rebuild of a K series.  I did one myself but have not dropped it in a machine as of yet.  You can see the project in this thread along with some little mods that you can do easily that will improve the performance of the engine. 

http://gardentractor...1977-312/page-2

Also, FOLLOW the manual when it comes to disassembly and reassembly.

Looking forward to your progress!


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#11 Trav1s ONLINE  

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Posted March 22, 2017 - 07:51 AM

Also, there were a few K241s that were built using a k301 block bored to standard k241 bore.  Those blocks can be bored to that a standard k301 piston or they can go even bigger.  I say go as big as needed which will maximize life of the block.



#12 Joe Knife OFFLINE  

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Posted March 23, 2017 - 06:40 AM

Baby steps: got the flywheel screen off last night with my daughters help and after several days of PB blaster shots. The sad part is, it was one of my cheapo Task Force screwdriver bits that finally did the trick.

Soaking the flywheel nut now, and I figure before I try to pull it I will get a tap and try to clean up those Rusty threads. Anybody know what size they are?
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#13 LilysDad ONLINE  

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Posted March 23, 2017 - 07:20 AM

Not off hand but you can check them at the hardware store where you get the tap. Builders Hint; many of the nuts and bolts used on the engine are special. (Notice how smooth the bolts on the flywheel screen are?) I think that's on purpose. Don't replace them. Toss them in a jar of vinegar to remove the rust.


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#14 Joe Knife OFFLINE  

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Posted March 23, 2017 - 01:03 PM

I can't take the engine block along to the hardware store...I guess you're saying test-fit a bolt in those puller holes and take that along when going for a tap.

 

Edit: turns out the threads for the puller bolts on the flywheel were the size of the ONLY tap I already owned, so they are cleaned up and ready to go. I haven't yet been able to remove the center nut holding the flywheel on. I don't have an impact driver and of course it's hard to hold the flywheel still to get it off with a breaker bar. I'm afraid if I put a pry bar between those fins on the flywheel they might snap off. Is it cast iron? Looks like it...


Edited by Joe Knife, March 23, 2017 - 06:40 PM.


#15 Joe Knife OFFLINE  

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Posted March 24, 2017 - 08:51 AM

The piston and the area where the head gasket seats both have a "B" does that mean anything?




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