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"Ancient" grains


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#16 Monk OFFLINE  

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Posted February 27, 2017 - 12:18 AM

You say you are interested in "Kamut" which is a protected brand name for khorason wheat which originated in the middle East, Iran I have heard, If I get it right and you are in Ontario I am afraid you will not have much luck, I believe the only place it is grown in North America  is in Montana and here in Saskatchewan as the hot dry climate suits it, Kamut is only grown under contract and only organically,  that is not to say you couldnt try growing some if you could get hold of some seed, say start out with an acre and if it worked use the crop to seed more the next year. I would look for a traditional wheat from your area, most of them though are no longer used due to disease etc, If you are not an organic farmer already I would suggest you think about. I have never regretted the desision to go organic.


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#17 jimmy G ONLINE  

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Posted February 27, 2017 - 03:33 AM

I have never regretted the desision to go organic.

I miss my companion garden,I'll till again when my dairy expansion is more manageable lol,all is good though cus the old garden is my greenest pasture,my livestock is fed organically as possible also,the sad thing in today's food is if you're body can't handle being poisoned (ROUND UP)then you must have allergies (but it's ok they have a pill for that),better yet is the new round up will kill most of the blights that have become tolerant to the old round up,and as good as we are at killing things we will never be able to kill mother nature's will to survive so I'm sure round up 3.0 is in the works,I do know if you grow ancient grains for the organic market and have to use pesticide or herbicides to keep it alive you have defeated the purpose
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#18 BTS OFFLINE  

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Posted February 28, 2017 - 10:26 AM

I miss my companion garden,I'll till again when my dairy expansion is more manageable lol,all is good though cus the old garden is my greenest pasture,my livestock is fed organically as possible also,the sad thing in today's food is if you're body can't handle being poisoned (ROUND UP)then you must have allergies (but it's ok they have a pill for that),better yet is the new round up will kill most of the blights that have become tolerant to the old round up,and as good as we are at killing things we will never be able to kill mother nature's will to survive so I'm sure round up 3.0 is in the works,I do know if you grow ancient grains for the organic market and have to use pesticide or herbicides to keep it alive you have defeated the purpose

 

I know people who have tried the pills but they don't work, all the farmers around here don't believe that the "allergies" are caused by the chemicals. But yet they all think that roundup is harmless too :wallbanging:.

Thanks for this post, I'm glad I'm not the only one who thinks this.


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#19 skyrydr2 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 01, 2017 - 06:23 AM

Don't worry your not alone... a lot of my customers have huge concerns over this and don't want to buy produce thats not "organic or gmo free"
The "organic" word costs you a lot of $$ to post on your products! With that being said....
We wont go there yet..
GMO only pertains to the use of herbicides used to keep weeds down and on occasion incects or a bacteria. In ANY case means nothing if grown all natural other than you get the absolute best genetics to help that plant survive to maturity!
In my years of growing a garden (45) I have found that the "organic" seed is straight up garbage! Over priced waste of money and i do not use them or recommend them. You will never get as good a crop as the Hybrid stuff.
BUTTT..the seed is nothing without good growing media and care and this is what makes the end results! Bad in, bad out! You plaster your plants with bad ass anti-biotics (pattented anti biotic=glyphosate) guess what you get out of it when you eat it!
They say it is harmless after 3 days in the sun...what happens if its applied under the shaded parts...yeah... I trust these guys as far as I can throw them!

Edited by skyrydr2, March 01, 2017 - 06:26 AM.

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#20 BTS OFFLINE  

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Posted March 01, 2017 - 07:48 AM

Don't worry your not alone... a lot of my customers have huge concerns over this and don't want to buy produce thats not "organic or gmo free"
The "organic" word costs you a lot of $$ to post on your products! With that being said....
We wont go there yet..
GMO only pertains to the use of herbicides used to keep weeds down and on occasion incects or a bacteria. In ANY case means nothing if grown all natural other than you get the absolute best genetics to help that plant survive to maturity!
In my years of growing a garden (45) I have found that the "organic" seed is straight up garbage! Over priced waste of money and i do not use them or recommend them. You will never get as good a crop as the Hybrid stuff.
BUTTT..the seed is nothing without good growing media and care and this is what makes the end results! Bad in, bad out! You plaster your plants with bad ass anti-biotics (pattented anti biotic=glyphosate) guess what you get out of it when you eat it!
They say it is harmless after 3 days in the sun...what happens if its applied under the shaded parts...yeah... I trust these guys as far as I can throw them!

 

We are not "Organic" certified, we advertise as "Chemical Free" and "GMO Free".

We never buy Organic seed, we also always thought it was a wast of time and a wast of $$$


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#21 skyrydr2 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 01, 2017 - 12:30 PM

Wheat doesnt grow well here but corn does, unfortunately tillable acreage is not readily available to only grow a grain.
Most big plots grow corn or alfafa or hay. Some do beans too but mostly for a cover crop. The few farms that are left grow lettuce or tomatoes or cabbage.
Strawberries and blue berries are king here as they grow well in this short growing season. Also 'taters grow good here as well. In factits gettin close to get the seeds started for tomatoes and peppers and cabbage type crops.
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#22 Jazz OFFLINE  

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Posted March 04, 2017 - 02:28 PM

Looks like there is some growing up here...not much that wont grow in the valley

 

 

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Yes I've grown it, more or less. 

Kamut is a trademarked product which refers to the plant traditionally known as Khorasan wheat: 
https://en.wikipedia.../Khorasan_wheat 

I obtained my original seeds from the Canadian gene bank, and it is classified as an emmer rather than a durum (I obtained a durum wheat at the same time, called Kabanka durum). From what I can gather, it is not really an emmer, or a durum wheat, but something in between, and there is some confusion when classifying it. 

It's a little different (the seeds are a bit smaller) than Kamut, but growing actual Kamut would be straightforward as it's available at the local bulk food store. 

Anyway, it grows tall, and the straw is good and strong which is handy as a construction or thatching material. My records show about 10 to 14 days between planting and emergence. You want to space the seeds as you would a modern wheat variety (3 '' apart) and looking for a planting density of around 20 to 25 seeds per square foot. 

I have been experimenting baking bread with Kamut in preparation for when my own wheat is producing. I typically don't use more than about 15% in the recipe as it makes the loaf very brick like. I have done a lot of reading and come to the conclusion that modern bread making techniques that involve kneading were developed in response to the advent of refined white flour. 

After many failed attempts, I have finally nailed making bread with 50% dark rye, 15% Kamut, and 35% whole wheat. It involves cool fermenting the Kamut and rye together in a 120% hydrated poolish (a baking term) for three days. I then mix in the whole wheat flour without adding any more yeast, or kneading it, and let it rise for about 8 hours before baking. It is a very wet dough by modern white bread standards, but it produces a loaf that is better suited for the table than it is as a construction material. smiley.gif

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#23 Jazz OFFLINE  

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Posted March 09, 2017 - 03:49 PM

You can also browse TBARS site and browse results

 

http://www.tbars.net...ymilestones.pdf)


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#24 Greasy6020 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 10, 2017 - 07:28 PM

You can also browse TBARS site and browse results

http://www.tbars.net...ymilestones.pdf)


Actually I talked to the guys there, I got some inside info... it's worth getting a membership fee.
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#25 oldedeeres ONLINE  

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Posted March 11, 2017 - 07:50 PM

I checked the site as well.... thanks Jazz. I'd like to try some of that hulless barley.
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