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"Ancient" grains


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#1 Greasy6020 ONLINE  

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Posted February 21, 2017 - 10:18 PM

Anyone know anything about growing them?

Seems to be a market for them, and I have land, along with equipment...

Growing it could be kinda fun, and educational.

Anyone know what prices are like?
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#2 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted February 22, 2017 - 04:59 AM

Do you have some kind of Agricultural Department with the government or a university? I would think that it could be very risky until someone has proved that it can survive in your climate and soil conditions. They may also require "organic" certification. If there is no info about growning in your area, you may be able to get a "sample" from the company or a research organization to try. Good Luck, Rick


Edited by boyscout862, February 22, 2017 - 05:00 AM.

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#3 Greasy6020 ONLINE  

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Posted February 22, 2017 - 08:02 AM

Do you have some kind of Agricultural Department with the government or a university? I would think that it could be very risky until someone has proved that it can survive in your climate and soil conditions. They may also require "organic" certification. If there is no info about growning in your area, you may be able to get a "sample" from the company or a research organization to try. Good Luck, Rick


Closest I have is an agricultural research station, put on by the government...

#4 LilysDad ONLINE  

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Posted February 22, 2017 - 08:31 AM

Did any of the original inhabitants of your area live a farming lifestyle; probably beans, corn and squash. It would be interesting to try to find out what varieties they had. Check with State Archaeologists.


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#5 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted February 22, 2017 - 09:21 AM

Closest I have is an agricultural research station, put on by the government...

The ag experiment station would be perfect. Check with them.


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#6 Greasy6020 ONLINE  

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Posted February 22, 2017 - 10:11 AM

Did any of the original inhabitants of your area live a farming lifestyle; probably beans, corn and squash. It would be interesting to try to find out what varieties they had. Check with State Archaeologists.


Pretty sure those guys did a lot of gathering, and hunting...
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#7 Greasy6020 ONLINE  

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Posted February 22, 2017 - 02:28 PM

The ag experiment station would be perfect. Check with them.


Apparently they have done a fair amount of work with it, in recent years
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#8 BTS ONLINE  

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Posted February 23, 2017 - 12:10 AM

What kind of grains are you wanting to grow and how ancient???. I am growing Turkey Red wheat I have 10 acres of it, 4 acres are on the edge of Burns and then 6 acres are about 3 miles from Burns. This is my first year growing the Turkey Red, so far it is doing really well and all the farmers around say it came up thicker and looks better then their new variety of wheat. 

 

The two last pictures are of my 4 acre field, the picture of the singe is in Goessel ks which is about 45 minutes away from me. I live in Marion County KS so I would be right in the area where the Turkey Red wheat was originally brought to. I am planning on grinding my wheat for flour, it will sell for $2.00 per pound.

 

Here is a link to my YouTube channel, I have videos of my tractors and combine that I am using for the Turkey Red.

https://www.youtube....&view=0&sort=dd

Attached Thumbnails

  • Turkey Red Wheat history.PNG
  • Turkey Red Weat Old Picture.PNG
  • Wheat Fields 033.jpg
  • Wheat Fields 041.jpg

Edited by BTS, February 23, 2017 - 07:42 AM.

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#9 ducky OFFLINE  

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Posted February 23, 2017 - 12:56 AM

Is that a winter wheat or a spring wheat?


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#10 BTS ONLINE  

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Posted February 23, 2017 - 07:40 AM

Is that a winter wheat or a spring wheat?

 

It is a winter wheat


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#11 Greasy6020 ONLINE  

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Posted February 24, 2017 - 10:52 AM

What kind of grains are you wanting to grow and how ancient???. I am growing Turkey Red wheat I have 10 acres of it, 4 acres are on the edge of Burns and then 6 acres are about 3 miles from Burns. This is my first year growing the Turkey Red, so far it is doing really well and all the farmers around say it came up thicker and looks better then their new variety of wheat.

The two last pictures are of my 4 acre field, the picture of the singe is in Goessel ks which is about 45 minutes away from me. I live in Marion County KS so I would be right in the area where the Turkey Red wheat was originally brought to. I am planning on grinding my wheat for flour, it will sell for $2.00 per pound.

Here is a link to my YouTube channel, I have videos of my tractors and combine that I am using for the Turkey Red.
https://www.youtube....&view=0&sort=dd


I'm not really sure yet... this kamut stuff sounds interesting, it matures early, which is an advantage here
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#12 LilysDad ONLINE  

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Posted February 24, 2017 - 11:11 AM

What is the advantage of that variety of wheat?



#13 Greasy6020 ONLINE  

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Posted February 24, 2017 - 10:09 PM

What is the advantage of that variety of wheat?


It matures early, and it has a fair following among the health nut crowd
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#14 BTS ONLINE  

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Posted February 25, 2017 - 01:10 AM

What is the advantage of that variety of wheat?

 

 

The advantage of the Turkey Red wheat is it has not been hybridized, these new wheat's are all mixed and everyone now has wheat allergies. No one used to be allergic to wheat, when I was a kid I never heard of anyone not being able to eat flour. I now know someone who has 6 people in their family that can't have flour or soy products. People do not seem to be allergic to these old grains, they are also a lot healthier because they do not need the sprays like all the new wheat. I was talking to a farmer one day and he said wheat used to be easy. He said you would plant it and not look at it again till it's ready to cut. He said now the wheat is always getting some kind of a fungus, blight, rust or ect. He said now he has to buy all different kinds of sprays which really add up $$$.

 

Another farmer (good friend) said the fungicide does weird things to the wheat, he was showing me in one field, that the wheat stock is a 1/2 to 3/4" wide, it looked like 6 pieces of straw stuck together side by side.

 

The Turkey Red wheat also has deeper roots, they grow a little bit of Turkey Red about 30 miles away for their thrashing days. They said in a dry year, the Turkey Red does better then any other wheat around. I don't know why more people don't plant it.

I will find out how it does this summer, so far it looks just as good or even better then other wheat fields around.


Edited by BTS, February 25, 2017 - 01:11 AM.

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#15 Jazz OFFLINE  

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Posted February 26, 2017 - 09:32 AM

Modern milling processes lose nutrients compared to traditional milling with stones,,,or so I have read. Locally Brule Creek farms grows and processes his own wheat and demand is large for a small operation. 


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