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Horse Arena Sand Burrs


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#1 bbuckler ONLINE  

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Posted January 17, 2017 - 05:39 PM

I really don't know where to post this under.

Any ideas on cleaning out the horse arena ? It over grown with sand burrs and I want to use that are for the garden tractor games.

 



#2 JBRamsey ONLINE  

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Posted January 17, 2017 - 05:45 PM

Rip it up with a cultivator and drag as much out with it as you can. Then get the garden rake and start going at it.
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#3 KennyP OFFLINE  

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Posted January 17, 2017 - 06:07 PM

Any tilling you do there will just bury the burrs and they will come back! I had them bad in a yard. Only way I found to control them was to use a shop vac and suck the burrs into it. Then you could burn them! Not a fun situation.



#4 bbuckler ONLINE  

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Posted January 17, 2017 - 06:13 PM

Any tilling you do there will just bury the burrs and they will come back! I had them bad in a yard. Only way I found to control them was to use a shop vac and suck the burrs into it. Then you could burn them! Not a fun situation.

Area is pretty good size. I guess I remove them close to the show I could worry about them coming back later on. 



#5 propane1 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 17, 2017 - 06:46 PM

What the heck is , sand burrs ??? Picture ?

Noel

#6 KennyP OFFLINE  

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Posted January 17, 2017 - 06:56 PM

What the heck is , sand burrs ??? Picture ?

Noel

Look this over! Roundup has met it's match!


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#7 29 Chev ONLINE  

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Posted January 17, 2017 - 07:06 PM

This was shown on one of the sites KennyP's link takes you to - vacuum cleaner and burlap bags dragged behind a riding mower or tractor - sounds like seat time to me :dancingbanana:

 

 

The final step is the most annoying, and I completely understand why. It's the process of gathering up as many fallen burrs (the seeds that will likely germinate again) as possible. Unless you want to kick around in layers of tube socks so the burrs can hitch a ride on your feet and ankles, you need a clever way to get them out of the yard, right?

The two most common methods involve a typical wet-dry vacuum or burlap bags.

Use the vacuum to suck up as many burrs as possible. You'll never get all of them, of course, but the few left behind will be more easily controlled with the pre-emergent herbicide. Do this before you do the humates and fertilization, so you don't suck up all the good stuff.

The burlap bags come into play in the tow-sack method. Drop something into the bag to weigh it down, then drag it around by hand or pull it along behind a riding mower or tractor. Once one side of the bag is covered, flip it. Then you can turn it inside out and go through the process again. Once you've used the burlap to its maximum, just throw it away.


Read more: http://ktrh.iheart.c.../#ixzz4W4D5noLk
 


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#8 Cat385B ONLINE  

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Posted January 17, 2017 - 07:08 PM

Gasoline and then drag the area with a remnant of pile carpeting two weeks later.

#9 propane1 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 17, 2017 - 07:43 PM

We have some thing here, we call it burdocks, birdocks, not sure if that's how it's spelled, or the exact name of them. These things grow two to three feet tall. Then in the fall the come of easily. So if ya touch them, they cling to you and are very hard to get off your clothes.

Noel
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#10 bbuckler ONLINE  

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Posted January 17, 2017 - 08:15 PM

I have had them put pin holes in tires before.


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#11 bbuckler ONLINE  

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Posted January 17, 2017 - 08:28 PM

My game plan : Mow with a bagger then use a cultivator to pull the plants up , rake , herbicide



#12 oldedeeres ONLINE  

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Posted January 17, 2017 - 08:38 PM

You could try a tiger torch hooked to a propane BBQ tank. Very time consuming and labour intensive but effective, and kills germination on the seeds as well as getting rid of the plant itself. We have used this method on burdock and Russian thistle with great success. Any seeds that do germinate later are dealt with using my friend, Round Up.
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#13 ducky OFFLINE  

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Posted January 17, 2017 - 11:29 PM

WOW those look like some nasty little buggers.

Do not see them in Wisconsin but we do had Burdocks.



#14 skyrydr2 ONLINE  

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Posted January 18, 2017 - 04:57 AM

Yup burdock or as we call them, cockle-burs..royal pain for sure.. torch does a number on the green plants but nothing for the burs except burn off the hooks.. the seeds need to be incinerated.. these things are a real issue. But when green and young they are easy pray for the weedbeater or mower/bushhog !
If only those danged thistle were that easy...
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#15 chieffan ONLINE  

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Posted January 18, 2017 - 02:15 PM

Yup burdock or as we call them, cockle-burs..royal pain for sure.. torch does a number on the green plants but nothing for the burs except burn off the hooks.. the seeds need to be incinerated.. these things are a real issue. But when green and young they are easy pray for the weedbeater or mower/bushhog !
If only those danged thistle were that easy...

 

There is a difference between burdock and cockle-burs though the burs look similair.  Both noxious weeds.  Had a bunch of sand burs in the garden this year.  Got to get them when they are young before they form the burs.  Used a stronger mix of Round-Up, not the watered down stuff you get at the garden/lawn center.  The isolated ones got pulled with a pier of pliers and turned up side down.  Got mine from the manure from feeding the neighbors hay to our goats.  Won't do that again.


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