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#16 Gtractor ONLINE  

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Posted January 16, 2017 - 10:11 PM

Thanks Classic.

I really enjoy building stuff.  Get that from my dad. 

I'm even going so far as to consider selling all my factory built stuff and building one "tractor" a winter to go a different direction with my collection.  I've been really wanting to build a pull type - period correct combine for the Case. 

Maybe someday.....

 

For now....  TEAR DOWN!!!!!!    Poochie helps every chance she gets - mostly tripping me. 

Sears 3.jpg

 


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#17 MFDAC OFFLINE  

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Posted January 16, 2017 - 10:17 PM

This will be fun to watch Kris!

 

DAC


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#18 classic ONLINE  

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Posted January 16, 2017 - 11:25 PM

You're welcome Kris. Building things becomes a passion, especially when designing something like this yourself. I found myself branching off into different directions, but I'm starting to settle with the 40's and 50's garden tractors. These are my favorite, mainly due to the fact that car parts were utilized in the ones that I'm working on. Building tractors like you are just adds to the fun of it all. How about building one of those 4wd Massey Harris tractors with a Wisconsin twin, early plymouth axles, and Economy tractor drop boxes at all 4 corners. The thought crossed my mind.
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#19 Gtractor ONLINE  

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Posted January 17, 2017 - 01:08 AM

Funny you should bring up the Massey 4X4!!

Topeka.jpg

 

I was digging through the bone pile looking for certain parts I need for this build and pulled out a Midland made 2 wheeler.  In looking at the transmission I thought about that very Massey.  I have plenty of these [would need 4] to have one on each corner for the drop boxes/final drives.  They have a 36.1 reduction [I checked because I was already thinking about this very build] which is a little slow but could be compensated for without much trouble. 

sears 14.jpg  

 

Last September these 4 matched steel wheels sold at auction in Iowa.  I was looking hard at them too but Lauber1 cabbaged onto them as they are his brand, Planet Jr.  They would have been perfect for the Massey build. 

PJ wheels.jpg

 


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#20 classic ONLINE  

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Posted January 17, 2017 - 01:53 AM

Now that's a coincidence Kris! When I was rebuilding my economy tractor with the model A Ford rear, the wheels (in my head) started turning. The carrier can be installed so that the rear axles can be spun in either direction. So a rear axle could be used for a front axle on a 4wd. I was thinking of maybe building something that articulates, to eliminate front axle knuckles, u-joints, etc. That would be heavily involved, and there are more than a few ways to make the front drop boxes pivot on the front axle. I do think the ultimate way to make it look as close as possible is to use the mopar rear axle like in a Panzer tractor, and a Ford A rear for the front axle with pivoting Economy drop boxes. Naturally, the gear ratios would have to be the same. This set up would look very similar to the Massey. Where there's a will,time, money, and resources , there's a way. A T96 or 30's Mopar transmission could be coupled to the Wisconsin twin PTO clutch. The front and rear axles would be linked together with a straight driveshaft. A sprocket would have to be mounted to this shaft, and a sprocket mounted to the output shaft on the transmission. This would tie the front axle, rear axle, and trans output shafts together. Of course the engine would be hanging off the front axle like the Massey, and the pto clutch and transmission would be sitting over the driveshaft. I would have to draw this up to see if it would be possible to do, but yup, I did think about it just a little, HA!
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#21 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted January 17, 2017 - 05:45 AM

See! I didn't have to use the brain to figure this out. Just let you guys do the hard part.

:watch_over_fence:


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#22 LilysDad ONLINE  

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Posted January 17, 2017 - 08:55 AM

 

 

My intent is to hide the upright cylinder under the hood and make fake cylinders out the front of the engine. 

I think this is a waste of the Cushman engine, which is so unique all by itself. If you are going to hide the engine, you might as well use a Briggs, or something.


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#23 Gtractor ONLINE  

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Posted January 17, 2017 - 12:30 PM

Valid point.  Thanks for the input.

Here is my take on that.

I am not changing, or modifying the engine, and there is really nothing to see on the top.  The Cushman is headless and water cooled with no exposed valve train on the top.  There is just a lonely spark plug up there and its corresponding wire.

[1] It will be able to be removed any time.  Just unbolt and remove the engine.  'Course then there is a big hole in the tractor.

[2] A Briggs won't have that "pop" sound like this Cushman.  I'm not a big fan of the pop but it helps make this project, well,  pop.

[3] Briggs won't have the neat flywheel.

[4] Briggs won't have the flat belt pulley it clutch exactly where they are supposed to be, for a John Deere D.

[5] That model of Cushman is actually pretty common.  Not using a rare engine.  I gave a whopping $135 for that engine @ a very large auction that had bidders from many states from all over the country. 

Originally I had clearance problems with the engines water pump but couldn't get it off the engine so I'm just gonna hafta work around that.  Cutting it off was not an option.

Please stick around and [otherwise] enjoy the build.  If I can't get it to work I'll just put the engine back on the skid and keep showing it that way.


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#24 LilysDad ONLINE  

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Posted January 17, 2017 - 02:00 PM

All valid points except #3. I'll be watching with great interest.


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#25 Gtractor ONLINE  

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Posted January 17, 2017 - 02:01 PM

I "used" this Deering sickle mower as a yard ornament for about 4, maybe 5 years before I decided it was too much trouble to move every mowing and drug it back to the fence row.  Now its been sitting back there for 10+ years.  President of the local tractor club begged me to sell it to him when he was here picking up a Deere #5 mower I gave him.  Told him I couldn't replace it for the $10 I gave for it so I better just keep it.  Those wheels looked about the right size for what I'm building so off they came.  I also have my eye on the seat and seat spring.  Poochie is making sure no squirrel sneaks up on me while removing the wheels.  That hedge tree is hollow and she can smell them in there. 

Sears 4.jpg


Edited by Gtractor, January 17, 2017 - 02:53 PM.

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#26 Gtractor ONLINE  

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Posted January 22, 2017 - 01:01 AM

I can't get the steering wheel off the shaft so the dash is still attached at this point.  Don't want to ruin the otherwise good steering wheel.

I bungee'd the wheels in place to see how they looked.  Perfect height - although a little narrow.  Kinda like the short traction nubs too. 

sears 5.jpg .

On my other home built tractor, I bolted scraps of tractor tires from old walk behind garden tractors on the wheels.  Those wheels already had the holes so I didn't have to drill for hours.   These wheels have a thick rim and the drilling will be intense.  Just like last build I will need a spacer to move the rear wheels out some so my big ole butt will fit between the fenders.  Last time, I cut the cone off of clicker hubs from a Simplicity 2 wheeler.  This time I am switching over to Midland built 2 wheeler because I have so many of them that aren't worth fixing up.  I grabbed this out out of the scrap pile because it was so rusty - TOO RUSTY in fact.

sears 14.jpg

Had to use a hand truck to move this Midland because it wouldn't even roll.  EVERYTHING frozen solid except the engine itself.  Its been laying out back for almost 20 years but I kept an old galvanized wash tub found at the city dump covering the engine.  Main reason I wanted this one is it still had decent tires so I was hoping the rims were good inside. At least they'd been up off the ground.  My I-H Cub Lo-Boy needs new front rims so I was killing two birds with one stone by tearing this 2 wheeler apart. 

Or so I thought!

The hubs were on the outside of the rims like is common with these.  You have to remove the clicker hubs from the axle to get the wheel off.  I put the rosebud tip on the torch and made those hubs glow.

Nothing!

3 times I heated them and never could get the hubs to let loose of the axle.  Knowing how precious [$$] torch gas is and having oodles and gobbs of these out back I decided I'd switch gears - and tractors!  My next pick wasn't nearly so rusty.  I learned my lesson.  In much nicer shape, it has lots of paint but no engine and the tires are rotted off.  Be an easy one to fix up because I have a stash of 6x12 tractor tires but I need some hubs right now.  Got these hubs off without even firing up the torch. It was like they had been off last month.  The flat part of the clicker hub that I need is 1 inch thick.  With both sides figured in that's two inches.  Using this setup also gives me the 5-bolt mounting so once I weld the clicker hubs to my steel wheels I will have an easy way to mount my wheels to the Sears hubs.

I just have to center them and make sure they will run reasonably true.

Found out the rims are 3 inches wide whereas my Lo-Boy uses 2 and 1/2 inch rims. 

Close enough!  These rims are good too so I will send them to the sand blaster and go ahead and paint and mount up my "new" front tires for it.   Those of you that remember the thread about the Lo-Boy I purchased last fall, and how I ruined one front tire,  a car tire, when I hit it with another tractor. Although I patched it up pretty good, I don't trust it to hold long term.


Edited by Gtractor, January 22, 2017 - 01:02 AM.

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#27 Gtractor ONLINE  

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Posted January 27, 2017 - 01:50 PM

Finally gave up on getting the steering wheel off and cut the tube and shaft just under the dash. 

sears 6.jpg

Needed something to mount to the front of the frame that'd hold the front axle.  Went out to the scrap pile and had a lookie.  The front of a tube frame Bolens has a neat cast iron axle holder.  Turns out its exactly the same width as the inside of the Sears frame.   This couldn't fit any better!!  With 4 bolts removed and one drag link unhook,  I have the part in hand.

sears 7.jpg

Not going to use the Bolens axle, it has too much "drop".  Need pretty much a straight axle.  Problem is I couldn't get the pin out to separate the two pieces. The pin was stuck in the axle.  Not wanting to use torch gas any more than I have to I wound up throwing the entire assembly in the shop stove.

sears 9.jpg

That worked slick!!!!!  Once I had burned all the rust out the pin came out lickety-split.

With a couple pieces of angle iron drilled and bolted in I have the front of the tractor figured out.  The engine will sit almost to the back of the angle irons. 

sears 10.jpg


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#28 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted January 27, 2017 - 02:19 PM

That'll add some weight to the front for you.


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#29 Gtractor ONLINE  

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Posted January 30, 2017 - 02:14 AM

Need all the weight on the front I can get - that's for sure.

Being sick the last few days nothing got done but I'm still a lil ahead of this thread.

Not by much but some.

Here is the front frame assembly set in place and tack-welded. 

sears 11.jpg

I've got a lot of cutting the blue part of the frame to do here.  Had to cut clear back to where the fancy wood-grained shift pattern/VIN tag is on the frame.  The Cushman engine has to sit far enough back that its flywheel is almost in the rear drive wheels way - except that the flywheel is inside [narrower] than the drive wheels.

Not sure you can tell from this angle but I angled the front end of the rear half of the frame down quite a bit - then put the angle iron front half in level.  Two reasons for this.  one the top of the transmission on the John Deere is pretty much level.  The Sears frame top has a pretty good slope.  Just trying to make things flow correctly.  Next, and more importantly,  I needed that upright Cushman engine as low as I could get it.  Remember, I have to hide that cylinder under the hood.  On the real Deere the top of the fenders and the top of the hood are pretty much the same height.  Keep in mind the real tractors fenders also have clearance for huge lugs on the drive wheels. When all this is taken into consideration,  things are going great. 

There are still many opportunities for me to foul something up.  Stay tuned!  You may get to laugh AT me. 

Tomorrow the plan is to arc weld the Midlands old cast iron clicker hubs to the rear wheels.   

My shop is wired for 20 amp, 220 service but the arc welder need 30 amp service.  Its a real pain. 

I have to run a huge extension cord in the back door of the house, through the back porch and into the kitchen,  Slide out the 400 pound 1962 Frigidaire Flair Custom Imperial cook stove, [yes it came from the city dump too] and plug the welder in there. 

[You might Google that stove.  AMAZING work of art] You may also get a glimpse of the stoves twin if you watch the TV show "I Dream Of Jeanie".  It has 2 ovens and hide-away burners that retract completely away!

I usually just weld on saw horses in the yard but if a vise is needed, I have just enough cord and welding leads to get to the bench vise in the shop.  Wouldn't be hard to upgrade the shops 220 service but I so seldom use the arc welder its hardly worth the effort.  The shops air conditioner works fine on the 20 amp service and I have a 110 mig welder for lighter duty projects that gets used often.

Anyhow, I cut the unneeded tapered portion off the hubs as I just needed a spacer. 

The one in the back is uncut.  The Midlands hubs were a 5-bolt pattern but were only drilled and tapped for 3 lug bolts.  I wanted all 5 utilized because the steel wheels are significantly larger, plus the steel wheels don't have the give the pneumatic tires do.  Makes for a much more harsh ride and much more stress on the hubs - and my welds. 

sears 15.jpg

This ring I'm holding [also from the city dump] has the correct spacing for the 5 bolt pattern on garden tractors.  Maybe they were wheel spacers - I have no idea.  I'm notorious for drilling the new holes just a fudgin off no matter how much measuring I do and that causes problems.  Part of my problem is that my drill press is a light duty hobby model and when I crank it down to really drill the table bends down causing the bit to crawl.  I bolted the spacers to the three existing lug holes as shown on the closest hub and got a bit that fit the spacers hole tight.  Then drilled just enough to give me a fool-proof "center" without worry about the bit crawling around.   With a center found I switched to the correct size bit for 7/16 lug bolts, which is 26/64. 

The first hole drilled at 26/64 was slightly too large and I didn't get much thread so the other 3 holes got a 25/64 bit to drill all the way through.  It was hard tapping but the end result was good deep threads. 

The Midland hubs utilize 7/16x20NF threads so the two per hub I drilled I made match with fine threads.

The Sears hubs were 7/16x14NC threads.  I will be drilling all the threads out of the Sears hubs and the lug bolts will screw out from the inside of the Sears hub into the Midland hubs.  This isn't really necessary but I want to be able to unbolt the wheels because I have other wheels that I may change to later.  I could weld the sears hubs right to the Midland hubs and then slide the Sears hubs on the transaxles - axles and clamp them wherever I want for the correct width.  Its also cheaper to bolt the two hubs together than it is to weld them since nickel rod is so high priced. 


Edited by Gtractor, January 30, 2017 - 02:29 AM.

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#30 Gtractor ONLINE  

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Posted February 06, 2017 - 01:01 AM

Always figured on using a Crud Cadet Ross steering box for this project.  They are easy to come up with and easy to service if they have too much slack. 

Out back in the bone pile I had this front half of an Original.  Actually I have the entire tractor but its already apart and that makes it easier to get to the steering box.  Poochie helped.

sears 17.jpg

Once I got the box off I could see it had trouble. Lots of slack and rain water had been getting in.  You can see how the main shaft was bent.  A little blue wrench and it was straight enough to adjust correctly. 
I cleaned and greased everything so it works like new now.  It is set aside for when I get to setting up the steering. 

sears 16.jpg


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