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Steps to a Good Paint Job...


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#1 Aussiedog OFFLINE  

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Posted June 04, 2011 - 11:03 PM

I really admire well, done paint jobs on restored tractors. This morning when I was reading one of my old issues of Farm and Ranch Living magazine (Aug/Sept. 2009) I found an article called "Secrets to a Perfect Paint Job". The author consulted with Ed Beranson, technical advisor for Old Iron Calendar and Dennis Black of Arlee, Montana, whose restored the 1936 John Deere AOS featured on the cover of the 2010 Old Iron Calendar.

These gentlemen recommended the following steps to getting a good paint job:

1) Wash and Prep - The first goal is to remove any type of film, including film from incorrect cleaners, which can ruin your paint job. This is a critical step prior to priming. They recommend using dedicated final wash products like Martin Senour's "Fin-L-Wash" or Dupont's "Final Klean". Mr. Black also sprays on enamel reducer and blows it back off before it dries.

2) Primer - Make sure your primer is compatible with the topcoat. On sheet metal, expoxy primer is recommended. Although expensive, it's high- build sands down to a nice, flat surface. On Cast Iron surfaces, use stock primer because expoxy fills in too much and doesn't look natural.

3) Topcoat - Beginning painters can get a nice looking, glassy finish with inexpensive "synthetic enamel paint" and a "good hardener". An example would be stock John Deere paint combined with NAPA's "Crossfire" synthetic enamel reducer and hardener. Using the right hardener and additives is the key. Crossfire stays wet longer and gives more working time. If it looks wet when the painting is finished it will look wet later on. If it looks dry when you're done painting, that's how it will look long term.

4) General recommendations - Alway paint on test panels before attempting your actual project to see the paint job you will be getting. Painting outside on calm days is often preferred because of better lighting. If its raining, the shop is the place to paint and the high humidity will help to keep the dust and bugs down.

Good luck on your next trophy quality paint job.:thumbs:
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#2 Malibusurfer OFFLINE  

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Posted June 04, 2011 - 11:43 PM

I would add to this, for a beginner try to stay with one manufacturers product. Mixing different types of Co. paint can get confusing and sometimes are not compatible.
Also, after all you body work and primer coats, spend the extra few bucks and put a sealer coat over the primer. This ensures a consistent color for your basecoat (or color) and also protects your paint job from anything bleeding thru after a few years.. If your at all familiar with painting, it's 90% prep work and 10% spraying. Spend the time and sand, sand, then sand again.... final sanding is: 320 grit for acrylic enamel (single stage) and at least 400 (recommend 600) for urethane (base/clear)...
Just adding to the post with my own experiences of painting for 15 years + .
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#3 coldone OFFLINE  

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Posted June 05, 2011 - 06:21 AM

I am no professional painter and I am not even a good painter but I do know its ALL in the prep work. Just as with wood working, Paint/stain/finish will not hide your mistakes it will make them stand out more. I have learned there is no short cuts to take during prep. Now if I could just start learning some patience so I would quit trying to take short cuts.
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#4 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted June 05, 2011 - 06:51 AM

As a Painter for some 25-30 years,I would have to agree with the first two posts.

#5 olcowhand OFFLINE  

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Posted June 05, 2011 - 07:10 AM

Maybe it was cases of bad luck, but when I cleaned my parts for painting with enamel reducer, the same I was using to reduce my paint, the paint would not flow on & would pull back. I found I needed to do the cleaning with lacquer reducer or a true type of a pre-cleaner. I had it pull back on me twice with the acrylic reducer, so switched right then to the lacquer reducer & paint laid down slick as glass. I'm no pro painter for darned sure though.

#6 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted June 05, 2011 - 08:13 AM

Good thread. I know I can stand to learn as much as I can about painting. I have a decent amount of experience on the spraying part but I am still not up on the types of paint and what is compatible with what.

#7 Malibusurfer OFFLINE  

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Posted June 05, 2011 - 09:45 AM

Good thread to continue!!! I would also put my 2 cents in by saying that with painting (like most things), you get what you pay for!!! I have sprayed about everybodies paint (companies) and there is a difference. With petroleum prices headed up again, paint/supply prices go up too. I do not spray the most expensive stuff (can't afford), but I have found some really good brands that are reasonable, and I have stuck with them for over 10 + years!! Find a paint system that works for you and try to stick with it if your doing more than one item. You will get better and better at laying paint. Personally I would suggest going to a local paint jobber and not your local NAPA or other type of automotive store to buy paint. Those paints seem to be harder to work with and will only frustrate a new painter. Plus those guys are not painters, there parts guys....
ALWAYS wipe everything down with wax and grease remover. When you've wiped it down, wipe it again and then tack rag it!!
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#8 coldone OFFLINE  

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Posted June 05, 2011 - 10:22 AM

Good thread to continue!!! Personally I would suggest going to a local paint jobber and not your local NAPA or other type of automotive store to buy paint. Those paints seem to be harder to work with and will only frustrate a new painter. Plus those guys are not painters, there parts guys....


Yes lets continue. Where do you find paint that isnt from NAPA? We have a Sherwin Williams near by but I dont know if they carry automotive paints.

#9 olcowhand OFFLINE  

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Posted June 05, 2011 - 10:28 AM

I buy from a PPG automotive paint supply. That's ALL they do!
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#10 Malibusurfer OFFLINE  

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Posted June 05, 2011 - 02:29 PM

I would check in the yellow pages in automotive / under paint suppliers/autobody... If you can't find one, go to a body shop and see who they go thru... Sherman Williams I heard has changed formulas and have very decent paint now.
I have sprayed PPG and Dupont, Glasurit, etc... While they spray and lay down very well, it is WAY beyond my budget, at least in my area...
I have had great luck with Valspar (over 15 years) and ProSpray, but they are available in my area at my local jobber and at a decent price.. For a small mower, dont be suprised to pay over $100-200 for supplies (that's everything start to finish), but like I said earlier, you get what you pay for...
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#11 olcowhand OFFLINE  

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Posted June 05, 2011 - 03:23 PM

PPG has at least 3 grades of acrylic enamel. I usually use the middle priced one, and while not cheap, it's good paint & not nearly as high as their highest priced line.

#12 DH1 OFFLINE  

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Posted June 05, 2011 - 05:37 PM

Well I am not a pro painter either but this tractor pictured was painted 100% with spray bomb, shaky can paint.
Tremclad Fire red.
Tremclad Recreational white.
Tremclad Satin black.
Tremclad Clear gloss top coat.
No primer was used.
I am sure if you put it side by side with one painted properly with good paint and spray gun equipment you would see a difference.

Electric Massey 027.jpg

#13 Texas Deere and Horse OFFLINE  

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Posted June 05, 2011 - 05:54 PM

Doug, It looks good from here in Texas..

#14 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted June 05, 2011 - 06:00 PM

Doug, looking good. Like your decals.

#15 DH1 OFFLINE  

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Posted June 05, 2011 - 06:14 PM

This was painted last winter, I tried 3, 4 times to do it with my compressor and spray gun but the cold weather with other problems, all I did was make a mess. So I said what have I got to loose brought it in the house piece by piece and spray bombed it. The clear gloss does add to the shine on the hood, we see how long it lasts.




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