Jump to content

Garden Tractors and Parts on eBay



Photo
- - - - -

A 1948 Gibson SD tractor that will be saved.


  • Please log in to reply
25 replies to this topic

#16 jabelman OFFLINE  

jabelman
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 38843
  • 2,022 Thanks
  • 1,489 posts
  • Location: nj

Posted January 08, 2017 - 08:09 PM

one tip I will pass along jim is I started "vinegar soaking" parts in a plastic tote. after a week of soaking I hit them with a wire brush to knock off the loose crap and back in the soaker for another week, comes out just as good as sand blasted, it's a cheap easy alternative.
  • Alc, LilysDad and classic have said thanks

#17 classic ONLINE  

classic
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 52970
  • 4,888 Thanks
  • 2,152 posts
  • Location: New York

Posted January 08, 2017 - 08:16 PM

It's funny that you mention that, Jay. I just soaked a galvanized pipe fitting in vinegar to remove the galvanized finish. It took two days, but it worked fine. The hardware store didn't have a black iron male/female 45 for my Wisconsin AKN exhaust, so that was the fix. I hear that molasses and water soaking works great on rust, too.
  • Alc said thank you

#18 jabelman OFFLINE  

jabelman
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 38843
  • 2,022 Thanks
  • 1,489 posts
  • Location: nj

Posted January 08, 2017 - 08:26 PM

It's funny that you mention that, Jay. I just soaked a galvanized pipe fitting in vinegar to remove the galvanized finish. It took two days, but it worked fine. The hardware store didn't have a black iron male/female 45 for my Wisconsin AKN exhaust, so that was the fix. I hear that molasses and water soaking works great on rust, too.


my neighbor is a chemist for a large pharmaceutical co. he explained the whole process with big words. basically just stick cheap white vinegar it's safe and easy just takes time, molasses and vinegar basically just "sticks" to the part no benefit other than a "paste" DON'T use muratic/hydrochloric it's way to aggressive and it's a different reaction on the metal no matter how you water it down.
  • classic said thank you

#19 KennyP OFFLINE  

KennyP

    FORDoholic

  • Super Moderator
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 2253
  • 35,895 Thanks
  • 44,624 posts
  • Location: Collinsville, Oklahoma

Posted January 09, 2017 - 05:53 AM

my neighbor is a chemist for a large pharmaceutical co. he explained the whole process with big words. basically just stick cheap white vinegar it's safe and easy just takes time, molasses and vinegar basically just "sticks" to the part no benefit other than a "paste" DON'T use muratic/hydrochloric it's way to aggressive and it's a different reaction on the metal no matter how you water it down.

So you use the white vinegar and not cider?



#20 HANKG OFFLINE  

HANKG
  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 29484
  • 6,071 Thanks
  • 3,333 posts
  • Location: Pt.Pleasant N.J.

Posted January 09, 2017 - 06:24 AM

Nice pick Jim i'm sure you'll meet the challenge
  • classic said thank you

#21 oldiron1 OFFLINE  

oldiron1
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 43924
  • 403 Thanks
  • 256 posts
  • Location: Wisconsin

Posted January 09, 2017 - 10:36 AM

Great find Jim!! As is the case with all of your restorations, I'm anxious to hear and see your progress pertaining to this one especially as I'm a real sucker for hooded Gibsons. 

 

With respect to replacement wheel centers and rims, Gibson used the same vendor as IH did, as EPCO did as well with their 24" tractors. Front wheels, rear rims and centers are the same as a Farmall Cub. Luckily, Cub wheels are all over the place and easy to come by. 

 

Rob


  • classic said thank you

#22 classic ONLINE  

classic
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 52970
  • 4,888 Thanks
  • 2,152 posts
  • Location: New York

Posted January 09, 2017 - 10:51 AM

Thanks Hank and oldiron1! I've been after a hooded Gibson for a while, and I'm anxious to dig into this one. There are some features on this Gibson SD that are not normally found, so I'm corresponding with Doug at gibson.registry@gmail.com Doug has been doing extensive research on these Gibsons and is very helpful and knowledgeable. If we can come to a conclusion about the details of this Gibson SD, I will post them here. So far we have found three things that are not the norm on the model SD. First, there are 5 holes in the hitch bar. Secondly, the dash has provisions for a steering column as on the Super D, but the hole for the column is covered by a block off plate. Lastly, the rear axle assembly is a modified Gibson model E axle assembly. The tractor does not look to ever have been repainted, except for the outside of the hood. All of the remaining paint on the tractor is thin and matches in color on all of the parts. Many years have passed since this tractor was originally built, so anything is possible.
  • oldiron1 and Mark 149 J. have said thanks

#23 classic ONLINE  

classic
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 52970
  • 4,888 Thanks
  • 2,152 posts
  • Location: New York

Posted January 09, 2017 - 11:03 AM

oldiron1, the Farmall cub wheel centers have provisions for wheel weights and are not flat where the lug bolt holes pass through. I don't know enough about the Farmall Cub wheels to know if they had wheel centers exactly the same as the Gibson at one point. So far, all of the Farmall Cub rear wheel centers look basically the same.

#24 oldiron1 OFFLINE  

oldiron1
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 43924
  • 403 Thanks
  • 256 posts
  • Location: Wisconsin

Posted January 09, 2017 - 12:51 PM

oldiron1, the Farmall cub wheel centers have provisions for wheel weights and are not flat where the lug bolt holes pass through. I don't know enough about the Farmall Cub wheels to know if they had wheel centers exactly the same as the Gibson at one point. So far, all of the Farmall Cub rear wheel centers look basically the same.

 

I guess I'll have to look at my Gibson's closer as I thought they had provisions for weights as well; exactly like my Cubs but could be wrong, or they could have been swapped out with Cub centers as well. I can confirm though that the Cub centers stayed the same throughout their long production run from 1947-1979.


  • classic said thank you

#25 classic ONLINE  

classic
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 52970
  • 4,888 Thanks
  • 2,152 posts
  • Location: New York

Posted January 09, 2017 - 01:19 PM

I've been talking with Doug from the Gibson Registry regarding the rear rim centers, Rob. Some Gibsons do have the same rear wheel centers as the Farmall Cub, but some Gibson tractors have the centers without the dimples and holes for the wheel weights. I would be needing the centers without the dimples and holes to replace mine. I really don't want to alter anything on this Gibson SD, except for the front rims and tires. Things are looking good with the engine in this SD so far. I could only get the crankshaft to turn part way around and found that the magneto was hung up. I took the magneto off and the engine spins freely now. I pulled the cover off of the magneto and it looks pretty clean inside. It's hung up, because some goo from the coil insulation dripped onto the rotor. The impulse spring seems fine, so once the rotor is free and the points are cleaned, I may get spark. I'm thinking that it's the original magneto, since there is some red over spray on it.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 20170109_121947-1.jpg
  • 20170109_122102-1.jpg

  • oldiron1 and Mark 149 J. have said thanks

#26 gibson.registry OFFLINE  

gibson.registry
  • Member
  • Member No: 83990
  • 9 Thanks
  • 4 posts
  • Location: Glen Mills, PA

Posted March 02, 2017 - 06:17 PM

Doug here from the gibson.registry project. Yes I can confirm that Gibson started out with the 24 x 7" de-mountable rear rim like the Farmall Cub but with a heavy dished center lacking provisions for wheel weights. Later period photos and some at the factory show in use the lighter steel center with rolled edges and dimples and holes for wheel weights. While I have not been able to pin down exactly when, it would seem to be late in 1948 or just after. The use of the lighter wheel center with wheel weight provision extended into period photos for the Gibsons manufactured by their successor Western American Industries. I do not know any thing about Cubs to know if the earlier ones had the heavier wheel center. Presumably Gibson was just purchasing what was being offered in the way of wheels and rims at the time.

 

Likewise the five-hole draw bar starts to make an appearance in late 1948 or just after. Some SD and Supers have three, and some five. Later Western American Industries Gibson (in a much reduced model range) continued with the five-hole style. I have not yet come across a reason for the switch, other than perhaps keeping up with the Joneses.

 

-Doug


Edited by gibson.registry, March 02, 2017 - 08:38 PM.

  • DougT, KennyP and oldiron1 have said thanks




Top