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Replacing hammer handles


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#1 dodge trucker ONLINE  

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Posted December 21, 2016 - 06:24 PM

seems a lost art these days, so many just chuck em and get a new one.

I have about 4 that need new handles and I have a bunch of new, replacement handles in my tool box bottom drawer, courtesy of my Dad,  BUT only 1 problem.

I don't seem to have ANY of the wedges that you drive in to keep the heads from slipping off.
Is there a place I could maybe buy a box of these wedges?


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#2 WrenchinOnIt OFFLINE  

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Posted December 21, 2016 - 06:27 PM

http://www.ebay.com/...pgAAOSwHnFV1pb9
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#3 gopher OFFLINE  

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Posted December 21, 2016 - 06:29 PM

Tractor Supply has them. Sears also.


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#4 Kurtee OFFLINE  

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Posted December 21, 2016 - 06:29 PM

okay he beat me to it. lots listed on ebay


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#5 gopher OFFLINE  

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Posted December 21, 2016 - 06:38 PM

Cheapest would be your Menards.


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#6 shorty ONLINE  

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Posted December 21, 2016 - 06:44 PM

My biggest trouble with replacement handles is how quickly they get loose.
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#7 MiCarl ONLINE  

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Posted December 21, 2016 - 07:59 PM

A few years ago I had the handle on a claw hammer break.  When I went to the store I found a new hammer was less money than a handle.....


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#8 MFDAC OFFLINE  

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Posted December 21, 2016 - 09:05 PM

My Mom believed in re- using broken hammer handles by carving them to fit and re-wedge, then when the handle got too short a broom handle would work! Then same procedure, if it breaks, carve it to fit the head and wedge it again until it was too short to hang onto!

 

DAC

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#9 toppop52 ONLINE  

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Posted December 21, 2016 - 11:18 PM

If you put a good two part epoxy in the split and over the top of the split and wedge, it will last much longer.
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#10 JBRamsey ONLINE  

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Posted December 21, 2016 - 11:45 PM

My biggest trouble with replacement handles is how quickly they get loose.


Then you are not putting them in correctly. You start oversize and shave them down. If you can slide the handle directly in the hole, it's too small. It should be very snug, even have to drive the handle in, then drive the wooden wedge and one or more of the metal wedges perpendicular to the wooden wedge.

If your handle is not absolutely dry, when it dries it will shrink and loosen.
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#11 oldedeeres OFFLINE  

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Posted December 22, 2016 - 12:07 AM

When I have a fencing job lined up I soak my hammer in a pail of water the night before I plan to use it. My favourite hammer is over 45 years old and I haven't had the head come off yet. It sounds silly, but I find a wooden handle is easier on my hand/arm than a metal or fiberglass one.

Edited by oldedeeres, December 22, 2016 - 12:09 AM.

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#12 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted December 22, 2016 - 02:08 AM

When I have a fencing job lined up I soak my hammer in a pail of water the night before I plan to use it. My favourite hammer is over 45 years old and I haven't had the head come off yet. It sounds silly, but I find a wooden handle is easier on my hand/arm than a metal or fiberglass one.


Yes. My father and grandfather both preferred wooden handles. Combined they had 90 years as union carpenters between 1923 and 1976. They said the wood is more forgiving for your arm. They also prefered a 13 oz. curved claw hammer(3 hits to a 16d nail). They didn't agree on much else so I figure the wooden 13 oz has to be the best way. I actually don't remember them using the soaking trick but heard about it from them. There were several handle factories in my area up until the 70s. Every once in awhile a bunch will show up at a swap meet. When the prices are low, I pickup a bunch. Good Luck, Rick
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#13 Jazz OFFLINE  

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Posted December 22, 2016 - 06:55 AM

Salvage a piece of hardwood from a pallet and make a wedge. Easy enough to cut with chop saw, table saw, jig saw, see saw....

Soaking a loose hammer in anti freeze will make your wood swell and stiffen up the head.


Edited by Jazz, December 22, 2016 - 07:06 AM.

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#14 shorty ONLINE  

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Posted December 22, 2016 - 07:03 AM

Then you are not putting them in correctly. You start oversize and shave them down. If you can slide the handle directly in the hole, it's too small. It should be very snug, even have to drive the handle in, then drive the wooden wedge and one or more of the metal wedges perpendicular to the wooden wedge.

If your handle is not absolutely dry, when it dries it will shrink and loosen.

That's how they were set. The daily use just wore them out. My 26 oz steel handle definitely has a better balance than any others l have had.
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#15 JBRamsey ONLINE  

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Posted December 22, 2016 - 08:26 AM

That's how they were set. The daily use just wore them out. My 26 oz steel handle definitely has a better balance than any others l have had.


About the years ago, I ran a side business building custom shipping crates for 69 Camaros. Yes, a crate big enough for car bodies. Initially I put them together by hand with three inch deck screw and 16 penny nails. I was pounding about 1200 nails a night. My 26 ounce steel framing hammer was the real deal--three swings to sink a nail, sometimes two. After about six months of that, I had a popeye arm and splurged for a framing nailer.
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