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do you use a vintage GT for weekly mowing?


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#31 jscam OFFLINE  

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Posted June 02, 2011 - 06:48 AM

My old 444's handle all of my work. That lady sounds like my SO......"why don't you just buy a new one?" I finally told her I dont want to hear another damn word about my old tractors............................ In my humble opinion, that's one of the things wrong with our "modern society"......nobody fixes anything anymore, they just throw it away and buy a new one.

#32 hydriv OFFLINE  

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Posted June 02, 2011 - 07:33 AM

My old 444's handle all of my work. That lady sounds like my SO......"why don't you just buy a new one?" I finally told her I dont want to hear another damn word about my old tractors............................ In my humble opinion, that's one of the things wrong with our "modern society"......nobody fixes anything anymore, they just throw it away and buy a new one.



Who's fault is that?

All of you need to look in the mirror for the answer to that question.

How many of you are willing to go out and plunk down ten to twenty grand for a new garden tractor with an array of attachments? To me, that's the problem with discussions like this. Everyone whines "they don't make them like that anymore" but fail to realize that in fact, they do make them like that today but you guys just come into the showrooms, kick the tires and leave your drool all over the product. Of course, you are happy to take the fancy color brochure home to continue your fantasy but you have no real intention of buying. Instead, you buy up an old GT package for ten cents on the dollar and then smugly scoff at the neighbour with the shiny big-box store LT because it doesn't measure up to the strength and quality of your 30 plus year old machine. It's a good thing that there are still some people out there with pockets deep enough to afford the new GT's and sub-CUT's or your grandkids won't be able to do what you guys are doing right now.

You guys need to give the manufacturers their fair due. If you look back to the 50's and 60's to see what a "riding lawn tractor" looked like compared to the current riding lawn tractors from MTD, Deere, Toro, AYP etc, we are talking night and day. Those early models often had tiny, solid rubber tires on a single-bladed mower deck and the seat was perched just behind the engine that you straddled. The sold for around $200.00 on average. Add a zero to that figure to get where we are today with inflation but look at the huge difference in what you get for your money. Manufacturers respond to consumer demand. The consumer always wants "lower prices" and then that happens, they buy it. But then they want even lower prices than before. Of course, those who are working for the company making the product also want more money in their pay packet and better benefits. The manufacturer becomes the creamy centre in the Oreo cookie. When both sides of the cookie push too hard, the creamy centre is forced out until there is nothing left. When that happens, management closes the plant and sources the product off-shore so that they have something to sell to the public back home.

If consumers WANTED items that could be repaired, then they would tell manufacturers that with their buying habits. Consumerism is what keeps this country going. If everyone bought products that could be repaired indefinitely, then a saturation point would be reached when everyone owned one of those items and then there would be little need to make any more of them. Production would drop, plants would shrink in size as would the workforce. With most of the population out of a job, who would have the money to buy anything?

So.... tell me again that you want to put an end to the "throw-away society" we live in.
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#33 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted June 02, 2011 - 07:35 AM

I wasn't going to reply to this thread because I mow with my " newest tractor " a 1983 JD 318 , guess I didn't think of it as being vintage but it is 28 years old .:smile1:

#34 Gary400 OFFLINE  

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Posted June 02, 2011 - 05:29 PM

my 1975 JD 400 has been doing the mowing now that its running and i love it . i had a L 130 JD and sold it, there just wasnt room in the shop for it after i got the 318 .

#35 coldone OFFLINE  

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Posted June 02, 2011 - 09:51 PM

How many of you are willing to go out and plunk down ten to twenty grand for a new garden tractor with an array of attachments? To me, that's the problem with discussions like this. Everyone whines "they don't make them like that anymore" but fail to realize that in fact, they do make them like that today but you guys just come into the showrooms, kick the tires and leave your drool all over the product. Of course, you are happy to take the fancy color brochure home to continue your fantasy but you have no real intention of buying. Instead, you buy up an old GT package for ten cents on the dollar and then smugly scoff at the neighbour with the shiny big-box store LT because it doesn't measure up to the strength and quality of your 30 plus year old machine. It's a good thing that there are still some people out there with pockets deep enough to afford the new GT's and sub-CUT's or your grandkids won't be able to do what you guys are doing right now.


Its not so much being able to as it is in priorities, speaking of myself. There has always been people that will spend that kinda money for their equipment or at least go in debt for it. Myself, i cannot and will not. Just as there has always been a used car market there will always be us "cheap" people looking for used GTs. Personally I like the looks of the new GTs that are out there but not the construction. Stamped steel instead of plate, aluminum instead of cast iron, fuel injection instead of a carburator. Sometimes "advances" in technology and engineering doesnt mean better. Look at the case Hydriv system, how old is it and how many "advances" have been made, not many. Compare that to JD GTs. Take the 318 for example, the pinacle of JDs GTs, is it in production anymore. If they made the 318 today what would be the price point? Would it be $10K+? Opps Drifting again. Anyway I stopped drooling over stuff years ago when I figured out what going into debt was all about. I will go into debt for somethings but they are stuff that is needed, not wanted. Do I go in and kick tires, every once and a while, just to annoy the sales people.

If consumers WANTED items that could be repaired, then they would tell manufacturers that with their buying habits. Consumerism is what keeps this country going. If everyone bought products that could be repaired indefinitely, then a saturation point would be reached when everyone owned one of those items and then there would be little need to make any more of them. Production would drop, plants would shrink in size as would the workforce. With most of the population out of a job, who would have the money to buy anything?

So.... tell me again that you want to put an end to the "throw-away society" we live in.


I think this 'consumerism" has been due to a shift in society itself. It seems that the majority of people knew the value of a dollar,and did not go into debt as easily as we do today. Plus i think people, men specifically, were more self reliant than what they are today. Men used to do manly stuff and get dirty, they would rather fix it themselves than pay someone else (value of a dollar). Today a manly man that gets dirty, or is blue collar is looked down at as a relic of an bygone era. If you dont have a Gym membership, drive a $50K vehicle, or have subscription to GQ you are not a "modern" man. So with this new "modern" man mentallity, todays men do not try to fix anything they just replace it. And this has created the throw away society, where it is easier to make payments than to fix it.

#36 middleageddeere OFFLINE  

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Posted June 03, 2011 - 07:03 AM

Hydriv-> Who says society should or has to be that way? I would prefer would steer away from consumerism. Matter of fact, the current economy is starting to do that for us. If economic crisis continues or even worsens, we will no longer be a throw-away society. The problem with consumerism, at least to the extent the US took it, is that everyone has to go into too much debt to sustain economic progress. If you truly believe in consumerism then you also believe that foreclosures, bankruptcy, excessive credit card debit are all ok things.
And no I don't drool over new tractors of any kind, I drool over the classics. The reason I would never spend 20-30 grand is not because I can't but because I don't think the product is worth it. They might be great tractors but I can get a JD 430 and totally rebuild it and have a bulletproof tractor or I can buy a new one for ten times as much and have a ?...They are not priced accordingly, end of story.

I hope I am not stepping on anyone's toes but we as a society really need to wake up and see that we cannot continue to spend the way we have. Our current economic crisis is a reminder of that.

#37 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted June 03, 2011 - 08:52 AM

I mow with a late 80's Kubota & a late 80's JD F935

#38 hydriv OFFLINE  

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Posted June 03, 2011 - 08:54 AM

Hydriv-> Who says society should or has to be that way? I would prefer would steer away from consumerism. Matter of fact, the current economy is starting to do that for us. If economic crisis continues or even worsens, we will no longer be a throw-away society. The problem with consumerism, at least to the extent the US took it, is that everyone has to go into too much debt to sustain economic progress. If you truly believe in consumerism then you also believe that foreclosures, bankruptcy, excessive credit card debit are all ok things.
And no I don't drool over new tractors of any kind, I drool over the classics. The reason I would never spend 20-30 grand is not because I can't but because I don't think the product is worth it. They might be great tractors but I can get a JD 430 and totally rebuild it and have a bulletproof tractor or I can buy a new one for ten times as much and have a ?...They are not priced accordingly, end of story.

I hope I am not stepping on anyone's toes but we as a society really need to wake up and see that we cannot continue to spend the way we have. Our current economic crisis is a reminder of that.



I think that you are taking my comments out of context. Nowhere in my post did I suggest that people should go deep into debt in order to support consumerism. I certainly am against borrowing beyond your means, as well as constantly carrying a heavy debt load.

To me, that situation has nothing to do with the public wanting items to be made at a lower cost. I think it fair to say that people want to be able to buy items that others buy but there is a substantial difference when it comes to income levels. If Johnny Rich two streets over is mowing his lawn with an X700 Deere with shiny green paint, then Billy Middle-class wants to do the same thing but perhaps his wallet is only fat enough for a D-140. Deere knows that Billy's D-Series will only last him a certain number of hours and then he will need a new one.

Billy accepts that fact because that's all he can afford or justify. Yes, the D Series can be considered to be a "throw-away " unit but so are many of the 10 year old cars people buy. A Rolls-Royce can be repaired for decades but who is going to pump big bucks into a Yugo?

If you think that the current economic crisis is going to change how America works, then I think that you are in for a surprise once the economy begins to roar back. Yes....right now the citizens are making do with what they have because they have either lost one source of income in the family or they are living in fear of that happening. The irony here is that the economic crisis is at least partially created by the unwillingness of all those people to spend money. If consumers do not buy products, then stores close due to lack of business and plants lay off workers due to lessening demands for the products they produce.

It isn't an easy problem to fix because it all revolves around money moving from place to place in society. When a large segment of society (the consumer) puts a stop to the movement of the money, then the economy falters until the consumer regains confidence and starts moving his/her money once again. The big problem is not with consumerism per se' but with irresponsible lending practices followed by irresponsible borrowing. That system only works in a strong economy with very low unemployment figures. But that situation is constantly too close to the edge of the cliff.

The second there is a sudden dip, a whole ship-load of people end up drowning as a result of a debt-load they can no longer carry. A domino effect begins and before you know it, the word "recession" is on the lips of all the talking heads that spout the 11 o'clock news.

Some of us buy old GT's because we care about these machines and we want to preserve them. Others buy them because they admire the strength and durability even if they have to spend time wrenching on them now and then. Other's buy them because that's all they can afford and there's no shame in that. It's far smarter to buy a $500.00 GT and pay cash from a pocket in your jeans than it is to finance a $2000.00 entry-level machine at HD for the next five years.

I disagree with your notion that the new GT's are not priced accordingly.

In 1965, a brand new Colt Rancher 12 had a list price of $1,014.00. The CT-44-R mower deck (44 inch) cost an additional $173.95. That's a total of $1188.00 in 1965 dollars. According to DollarTimes.com | Inflation Calculator , $1188.00 in 1965 is the same as $8,345.66 today.

For the record, the Colt tractor became the Case tractor and then became the Ingersoll tractor of today. There is a huge difference between the 1965 tractor and the 2011 Ingersoll when it comes to overall strength, ergonomics, engine design and so forth. Therefore, it is reasonable to expect the 2011 equivalent model to cost more if it offers more. As it happens, I own three old Colts and I don't own a brand new Ingersoll. But if you compare the adjusted value of those old Colts to the price of a $2000.00 D Series Deere, you could own 4 brand new D-Series machines for less than the price of one garden tractor.

So getting back to the comment made at the beginning of this thread, is it reasonable for anyone to deride the so-called "box store junk" once you factor in the above?

#39 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted June 03, 2011 - 02:37 PM

I don't think that the manufacture will make something that does not sell. And they are going to make what sells the most units at a reasonable price point. I too an guilty of saying that they don't make them like they used to, and that makes me part of the problem.
I have not bought a new showroom fresh car since 1974. And have never bought a new tractor or Garden tractor.

I live in a town of 18,000 and work in Des Moines population 300,000(Des Moines is not as big as some Suburbs in the larger cities of this country). The Garden Tractor Dealers in Des Moines will probably sell as many Garden and Lawn Tractors in a year for postage stamp lawns in the city as the Dealers in my county would sell in 10 years. So is it any wonder they manufacture machines best suited for postage stamp Urban lawns?
I can't say the manufaturer is wrong, if they are giving the public what they want to buy at the price they are willing to pay.

Also most us of are what would be called Gear Heads and have learned to maintain our own equipment and enjoy the challenge. We don't understand that the vast majority of the public is not like minded, don't care to learn or want to do their own mechanical work.
Or they are too busy to do it even if they wanted to? So it is easier to lay down the cash to pay someone to do the work or buy a new machine when the old one shoots craps. I can't say they are wrong, just different.

And Coldone I agree about the shift in society, and it is the reason I work in Des Moines.
There is a mass migration from rural areas to the cities. Mostly due to a shift from agriculture and agriculture related incomes to more Urban professions. People have to go to where the jobs are and that's the city.
And subsequently go from large rural yards and homes to Postage Stamp Urban lawns.

Edited by JD DANNELS, June 03, 2011 - 03:01 PM.


#40 middleageddeere OFFLINE  

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Posted June 04, 2011 - 09:37 PM

I use my 79 317 to mow, is that vintage?

#41 B10Dave OFFLINE  

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Posted June 04, 2011 - 09:54 PM

I do all of my mowing on 1 1/2 acres with my Allis 919Hydro. Snow blowing and garden tilling are looked after by one of my 1965 BigTen tractors. Dave

#42 Norwood EYE OFFLINE  

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Posted June 05, 2011 - 04:59 PM

Mow every week with a 1981 Case 224. About 7/8ths of an acre, it does a fantastic job.

#43 poncho62 ONLINE  

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Posted June 05, 2011 - 06:48 PM

Cut today with my 1970 MF10

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#44 coldone OFFLINE  

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Posted June 05, 2011 - 06:53 PM

I used the WH D160 for the first time yesterday, problems and all! I must say that I have never had a quality mower, craftsman LTs were as high as i got, man what a difference in cut. Even with the tractor giving me problems and me figuring out how to use it, the 30 year old deck did a great job. My wife thinks its a Keeper.

#45 zr600 OFFLINE  

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Posted June 19, 2011 - 10:34 PM

Im not yet but im really close to using my jd 300 for my weekly cutting. I currently have a la145. I need a tiller, snowblower, and mower now and the la can only do one of them task. Now i need to get out to the garage and get the mower deck back togethor. New spindle bearings and blades, and all new bolts for the spindle housings.




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