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#1 ndjd316 OFFLINE  

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Posted May 30, 2011 - 04:45 PM

Hey guys,

Looking for a little help. I have decided to buy a new garden tractor and would like some advice. I mow about 3.5 - 4 acres of lawn. Most is old pasture that I have been mowing for around 15 years. It is bumpy but in nice shape. It gets thicker every year and I currently use a 13 hp Honda H5013. The 13hp is a dog in thick grass, I need something with more hp and rpm. I have been looking on line and have almost settled on the Cub Cadet LTX1050. Looking to spend around $2000, any advice from the crew would be great.

By the way I picked the Cub Cadet do to its reputation and that I used to own a 1970 Cub Cadet 105 that was the wifes grandpas. What a solid built machine.

Thanks for any advice.

#2 ndjd316 OFFLINE  

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Posted May 30, 2011 - 05:15 PM

Also woundering which engine is better the Kohler or the Kawasaki?

#3 KIRO-1 OFFLINE  

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Posted May 30, 2011 - 05:53 PM

Kohler! Just my opinion though. Can't tell you much about the 1050LTX. Sorry.

#4 hydriv OFFLINE  

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Posted May 30, 2011 - 06:04 PM

Sorry to have to tell you this but you are barking up the wrong tree. Grandpa's 105 CC was an excellent built GT but a 1000 Series CC is nothing more than a cheap-ass lawn tractor made by MTD, who bought the Cub Cadet company many years ago.

Secondly, your Honda was designed to mow lawns, not fields and it's a tribute to the strength of the Honda product that has allowed you to perform this work for so many years. Field mowing is done by mower decks with free-swinging blades and those are called "rough cut mowers" or "Bush Hog style" mowers. In my opinion, you will kill that 1050 within a few years. I would expect to see stress cracking in the frame from all the twisting that takes place while mowing uneven ground. Lastly, your budget is totally unrealistic. Your application calls for a true garden tractor PLUS a Swisher rough cut self-powered towable mower for the field areas.

Your other option is to pay a local farmer to plow your rough field, disc it, harrow it nice and smooth and then plant it with a seed mix that is appropriate for your area. The local seed house can mix a blend that is best for you. Then you could get away with a lawn tractor because that's what you would be mowing.

As for engines. you cannot toss out names and get a proper answer. Manufacturers make several lines that are designed to last a certain number of hours before needing to be rebuilt. Briggs and Stratton's Vanguard, Kohler's Command Pro, Honda GX, Generac and Kawasaki engines are all highly rated as being Commercial Grade.

#5 ndjd316 OFFLINE  

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Posted May 30, 2011 - 06:50 PM

Thank you for your opinion and the old cub cadet was a great tractor but rode rough after hours of mowing. Our (lawn) isn't really a field the way that I belive you are thinking. Yes we live in North Dakota and they farm the fields around us, they also hay them
for all of that great grass that grows in them. It's not hilly and doesn't have a bunch of holes. Also I am not interested in any kind
of big pull behind mower because they don't cut short enough to help keep the wood tics and bugs out. Now then if you would like to rethink and maybe throw me a new suggestion of a really well built to last garden tractor I would appreciate that input. I'm looking for at least a 20hp 46-50 inch cut.

#6 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted May 30, 2011 - 06:55 PM

With your budget I would honestly consider getting an extremely nice used garden tractor. Something along the lines of a Case 400 series(yes hydriv I am recommending a Case), Massey / Snapper 1655-1855, Cub Cadet 582,682,782 would all be terrific candidates. Something with 26" tires will help smooth the ride and the Case 400 series has the tall rear tires.

#7 Bolens 1000 OFFLINE  

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Posted May 30, 2011 - 07:13 PM

:ditto:

I guess I could throw a Bolens Large frame into the mix as another possible candidate.
an 1886, HT20 or HT23 would get the job done with a 54'' deck

#8 hydriv OFFLINE  

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Posted May 30, 2011 - 07:22 PM

Thank you for your opinion and the old cub cadet was a great tractor but rode rough after hours of mowing. Our (lawn) isn't really a field the way that I belive you are thinking. Yes we live in North Dakota and they farm the fields around us, they also hay them
for all of that great grass that grows in them. It's not hilly and doesn't have a bunch of holes. Also I am not interested in any kind
of big pull behind mower because they don't cut short enough to help keep the wood tics and bugs out. Now then if you would like to rethink and maybe throw me a new suggestion of a really well built to last garden tractor I would appreciate that input. I'm looking for at least a 20hp 46-50 inch cut.


Keep in mind that everyone is following your lead with respect to the information YOU provide us. You said it was an old pasture that was "bumpy". Lawns are not bumpy and that's why lawn tractors can mow them without a lot of chassis stress. However, only you can decide what the subjective term bumpy actually means because none of us are there to make such an assessment.

Yes...farmer do hay their fields but they use tractors with rear tires that are mounted on 24" diameter rims, not 12" rims that are common on lawn tractors and even many garden tractors. As nutndun suggested a 444 Case or Ingersoll garden tractor would be a much better choice because it uses 16" rear rims to help smooth your bumpy ride. One of those can be had within your current budget.

John Deere also sells new garden tractors with their X700 Series but you are looking at ten grand and up. Even a new Ingersoll is in that same price point. USED is your best option to find something that meets your budget but is built rugged enough to stand up to the task. Oh.... and you can get a 60 inch deck for Case and Ingersoll tractors made in 1980 and newer. That should appeal to you.

#9 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted May 30, 2011 - 07:26 PM

Don't forget the John Deere 300 series tractors. Something like a GX345. I saw one for sale locally for 1500$. Liquid cooled 20hp Kawasaki twin. When you are looking at used tractors you can often get attachments with them that would cost you big$ to purchase for a new machine. I think a Kawasaki engine is a good choice. I wouldn't let that be a determining factor. Both brands of engine are good.

#10 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted May 30, 2011 - 07:35 PM

Yep there are a lot of options if you go used. Your budget will get you one in awesome condition with low hours. Like has been mentioned already and I forgot the John Deere 300 series, Bolens large frame and the others that have been mentioned are all great choices. Plus you would have the option at a later time to get attachments and do plowing, clear snow,... the possibilities are endless.

#11 jms180 OFFLINE  

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Posted May 30, 2011 - 07:46 PM

I have a cc 2006 i bought 1998 before MTD started making throw away mowers. It has been a good mower now has 35o hrs showing. It has 20 hp Kohler engine which has never given any problems. I have seen used ones for sale at about 1000 dollars.

#12 Aussiedog OFFLINE  

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Posted May 30, 2011 - 07:59 PM

I agree with most of the member opinions here regarding getting a more heavy duty garden tractor if you are mowing fields over a lawn. I was just interested in the Cub Cadet LTX 1050 you mentioned so I did some online research on it. With consumers so willing to share their own personal experiences with their new equipment on the internet you don't have any problems finding out what's good and bad with a particular machine.

This is Cub Cadet's website.
Riding Lawn Tractors - Cub Cadet LTX 1050 KW

This is a good site where many new LTX 1050 owners rate their machine, both good and bad. Lots of complaints about the mower deck and PTO belt system. Be sure to read all of these :
Cub Cadet LT1050 Review, Price, Information

This new LTX 1050 owner felt his transmission was too noisy so he made a video of it.
YouTube - ‪panchohughes

The same owner also made a video of where his transmission linkage rubbed and vibrated:
http://www.youtube.com/user/panchohughes#p/u/6/1moBD0hnsds

If you buy a new tractor, buy it fom a reputable, local dealer over a box store. This LTX 1050 buyer had a very bad experience at HD.
The Home Depot | Rip-off Report: 473540

Good luck!

Edited by Aussiedog, May 30, 2011 - 08:35 PM.

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#13 ndjd316 OFFLINE  

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Posted May 30, 2011 - 08:38 PM

Aussiedog, Thanks for the web for reviews. Back to looking at John Deere, it is the only place around here that services what they sell. Would love to find and rebuild an older big mower but no time with work and all the mowing I do. Thanks to all for your input, Cub Cadet has really gone down hill over the years. I sold the CC105 in 2009 and it was still running strong, it was just a back breaker.

#14 hydriv OFFLINE  

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Posted May 31, 2011 - 04:27 AM

The current D-Series John Deere tractors are also light duty machines that range in price up to $2800.00 MSRP. Just like the CC's, they have stamped steel frames. There have been reports of front axles snapping and stress cracks. Forums such as Garden Web see reports of hydro failures within six years or so. The D-Series is a new designation for the previous LA Series which superseded the original L Series. If you Google either one of those, you will find reports about failures just as there are reports about CC failures. It's your money but if you think that a warranty is going to protect you, think again. If you use the wrong machine for the application, kiss your warranty goodbye.

#15 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted May 31, 2011 - 05:39 AM

Aussiedog, Thanks for the web for reviews. Back to looking at John Deere, it is the only place around here that services what they sell. Would love to find and rebuild an older big mower but no time with work and all the mowing I do. Thanks to all for your input, Cub Cadet has really gone down hill over the years. I sold the CC105 in 2009 and it was still running strong, it was just a back breaker.


Just because you buy a used garden tractor doesn't mean you would have to rebuild anything on it. That is why I stated with the budget you are willing to spend you can get a superb used garden tractor that is in great shape and doesn't need any work other then maintaining fluids and adding gas.

A lot of us on the other hand collect as many as we can so we look for the ones that do need work so we can get them cheaper. I will post some examples tonight when I get home from work of what you could get for the money and I am sure some of the other guys could do that same.




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