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#76 Buckshot752 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 06, 2017 - 03:35 PM

We have lots of fire ants here in eastern NC. I have thought about this for years. Never came up with any solution. You know these ants go pretty deep and the only to kill them is catch em on top of the ground. In order to reproduce they build mounds on the surface as incubators for there eggs. These eggs are taken down into the nest at night. I think if you can come up with a way of destroying these eggs while they are in the incubators, the ants would continue to lay more. Maybe they would leave for better pastures. We have automatic robotic vacuums for our homes. Why not make some that would target these mounds during the day time and keep them knocked down. Just a thought. Anyone want to add to this?

 


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#77 Chucktin ONLINE  

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Posted February 06, 2017 - 03:52 PM

Hmm Tempo. I'll look that up.

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#78 larrybl OFFLINE  

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Posted February 06, 2017 - 04:25 PM

Excuse me for dumb question. Are those all ant mounds in photos? I've only drove across panhandle couple times not familiar with far south. If it is you have one heck of an ant farm. I think you need a crop duster.     

Yes, all those are ant mounds. I would estimate around 200 acres across the road. Those mounds are around 2 - 3' across. I have about 5 acres, and after a rain the mounds pop up all over. In the summer, I'll mow over them just to keep them at grass level. Last year I treated about 1-1/2 acre with around 30 - 50 lbs of Ortho. Didn't seem to phase them at the time. I might try getting more aggressive this year. Going bare foot from the pool to porch 10' and you will get bit. And just one is enough.


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#79 bbuckler ONLINE  

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Posted February 06, 2017 - 05:38 PM

Yes, all those are ant mounds. I would estimate around 200 acres across the road. Those mounds are around 2 - 3' across. I have about 5 acres, and after a rain the mounds pop up all over. In the summer, I'll mow over them just to keep them at grass level. Last year I treated about 1-1/2 acre with around 30 - 50 lbs of Ortho. Didn't seem to phase them at the time. I might try getting more aggressive this year. Going bare foot from the pool to porch 10' and you will get bit. And just one is enough.

And being wet makes the bite feel worse.



#80 toppop52 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 06, 2017 - 06:26 PM

We have lots of fire ants here in eastern NC. I have thought about this for years. Never came up with any solution. You know these ants go pretty deep and the only to kill them is catch em on top of the ground. In order to reproduce they build mounds on the surface as incubators for there eggs. These eggs are taken down into the nest at night. I think if you can come up with a way of destroying these eggs while they are in the incubators, the ants would continue to lay more. Maybe they would leave for better pastures. We have automatic robotic vacuums for our homes. Why not make some that would target these mounds during the day time and keep them knocked down. Just a thought. Anyone want to add to this?


I can vouch for Eastern NC being infested, I was born and raised in South Mills.

#81 LilysDad ONLINE  

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Posted February 06, 2017 - 06:37 PM

Get a cheap deal on Hula Hoops and lace curtains. Assemble ant version of a butterfly net without a handle. Everytime you see a nest, just drop a hoop over the nest until they starve. Making inventions is fun!


Edited by LilysDad, February 06, 2017 - 06:38 PM.

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#82 dropped82 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 06, 2017 - 07:00 PM

Get a cheap deal on Hula Hoops and lace curtains. Assemble ant version of a butterfly net without a handle. Everytime you see a nest, just drop a hoop over the nest until they starve. Making inventions is fun!

That's until the army picked up the net and proceeds to capture you haha.

Eric

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#83 Stroud OFFLINE  

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Posted February 06, 2017 - 08:13 PM

Maybe try a biodegradeable soap solution. I have used this method on undergroud bee hives or nests. It works over time as the drones get coated with the oily solution that covers them, It finally coats them with a layer that cuts off their oxygen and weighs them down to impair their movement as it dries. Knock out the workers and it all falls apart. I have never retuned to a destroyed nest this way and found any impact on the growth in veggetation, not even firns. Don't go super solution, use best judgement and be paitient. It will be some trial and error as to what products are available in your area. 


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#84 larrybl OFFLINE  

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Posted February 06, 2017 - 08:24 PM

I would guess over 150 mounds of various sizes around my yard. They like building next to foundations, Planters, and fence posts also. Conventional methods (ant killer) doesn't seem to work as there is too much area to cover. This thread has provided another possible option, sort of on the tech side. I was thinking of using a shop-vac set to blow, and set a bug bomb off inside the vac and put the hose in the mound. Well that requires electricity, and I'll probably blow my vac to smithereens. But! what if I attach a flex hose to the push mower exhaust and force hot exhaust into the mounds, say 20 minuets per mound. If it works, it would take about 50 hours to complete.    



#85 Cvans OFFLINE  

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Posted February 06, 2017 - 11:52 PM

Out of all the good ideas I've seen here I like the Tempo suggestion the best. It's safe to use and any bug that touches it is dead. 


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#86 shorty ONLINE  

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Posted February 07, 2017 - 06:39 AM

As a youth, my uncle would gas groundhogs by running a hose into den from a vehicle. It would clean them out.
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#87 larrybl OFFLINE  

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Posted February 07, 2017 - 10:39 AM

Out of all the good ideas I've seen here I like the Tempo suggestion the best. It's safe to use and any bug that touches it is dead. 

I looked Tempo up, One $60.00 container treats 30,000sqft. I would need around 7 of these. It doesn't mention fire ants in the description. Fire Ants are NOT like regular ants or insects. If they were easy to get rid of, those of us in the South wouldn't have this issue. I'll probably spend a couple hundred on a treatment that specifically targets fire ants this summer.   

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Edited by larrybl, February 07, 2017 - 10:41 AM.

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#88 ducky OFFLINE  

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Posted February 07, 2017 - 12:30 PM

Here is some interesting info on the subject.

http://fireant.tamu....controlmethods/


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#89 ducky OFFLINE  

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Posted February 07, 2017 - 12:38 PM

Here is some more info.

Attached File  2013-Fire-Ant-Bait-Misc-Control-Products-5-30-13.pdf   52.73KB   19 downloads


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#90 secondtry ONLINE  

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Posted February 07, 2017 - 01:25 PM

I once parked a running push mower over the top of an ant hill, running with a full tank of gas. Went back the next day, no ants. Don't have a clue why this worked. They were not fire ants. Don.






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