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Bolens 1053 Return to Service Project


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#91 29 Chev ONLINE  

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Posted November 22, 2016 - 08:26 PM

Not sure what I am going to use for an engine yet - maybe I will get lucky and find a TRA10D complete with a good pulley at a reasonable price close to home - time will tell.



#92 BRIAN EK7&10 OFFLINE  

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Posted November 22, 2016 - 09:11 PM

Not sure what I am going to use for an engine yet - maybe I will get lucky and find a TRA10D complete with a good pulley at a reasonable price close to home - time will tell.


I have a complete TRA10D engine no pulley and not to close to home but it could be had for a couple of seat covers!

#93 29 Chev ONLINE  

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Posted November 23, 2016 - 08:59 AM

I have a complete TRA10D engine no pulley and not to close to home but it could be had for a couple of seat covers!

I will keep it in mind but I imagine shipping from Indiana on the engine would kill the deal.  There is no panic on an engine as I have a long way to go before I require one - worst comes to worst I could always adapt something like this - http://www.princessa...art/A-p8129553e.



#94 Chubien OFFLINE  

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Posted November 23, 2016 - 08:40 PM

I may have a TRA for you but it would be a heavy smoker!
If you already have a TRA and simply missing the pulley I may be able to help with that too.

#95 BRIAN EK7&10 OFFLINE  

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Posted November 23, 2016 - 09:18 PM

I will keep it in mind but I imagine shipping from Indiana on the engine would kill the deal.  There is no panic on an engine as I have a long way to go before I require one - worst comes to worst I could always adapt something like this - http://www.princessa...art/A-p8129553e.

I may be able to get it to buffalo ny at some time early next year

#96 29 Chev ONLINE  

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Posted November 24, 2016 - 04:50 PM

Got a few more things done today - first I pressed the release bearing back on to the rear clutch flange.  Then I decided to tackle taking the steering column apart and removing the PTO control rod - I knew the PTO pivot block was seized to the shaft when I took the tractor apart which did not surprise me.  I started by setting the column assembly up on the saw horses and then put a 2x4 on top of a piece of U channel to support the lower gear where the roll pin was.  I used a 1/2" nut between the gear and the 2x4 to give the roll pin a place to go and started it moving with the roll pin punch - once the roll pin hit the 2x4 I used a socket in place of the nut.  Once the roll pin was removed I used a large punch to drive the steering shaft up and out of the gear - turned the punch around so that the large end of the punch was against the shaft.   Once the gear was removed I slid the shaft out of the steering column - there was not much left of the plastic bushing that was in the top of the column.  Judging by the chunks missing from the bottom of the steering wheel I assume someone has tried to remove the wheel from the shaft at one time - will have to try and repair the missing chunks with some JB Weld.  Next I moved on to removing the PTO pivot off the shaft so that I could remove the shaft from the ear on the steering column - I used a wire brush on the shaft to remove the rust and crud and was able to slide the shaft back through the nylon bushing in the ear on the steering column until the rear of the pulley idler made contact with the bushing.   I removed the two roll pins at the rear of the pivot (again supporting the shaft with a 1/2" nut underneath) and removed the tension spring.  Then I removed the roll pin that retains the handle to the pivot and removed it and the spring for the handle which has seen better days. 

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Release Bearing Pressed Onto Rear Clutch Flange.jpg
  • 2 Ready To Start Taking Steering Column Apart.jpg
  • 3 Roll Pin That Retains Lower Gear To Steering Shaft.jpg
  • 4 Half Inch Nut Under Gear.jpg
  • 5 Roll Pin Started To Move.jpg
  • 6 Roll Pin Started To Move.jpg
  • 7 Chunks Broken Out Of Steering WHeel.jpg
  • 8 Roll Pin Removed And Starting To Drive Out Shaft.jpg
  • 9 Punch Turned Around To Drive Out Shaft.jpg
  • 10 Gear Removed From Shaft.jpg
  • 11 PTO Engagement Shaft Cleaned Up Slid Back.jpg
  • 12 Ready To Remove Spring Roll Pins In Shaft.jpg
  • 13 Front Roll Pin Removed And Working On Rear.jpg
  • 14 Control Lever Removed.jpg
  • 15 Spring In PTO Pivot Distorted.jpg
  • 16 Spring Removed.jpg

Edited by 29 Chev, November 28, 2016 - 08:06 PM.

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#97 29 Chev ONLINE  

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Posted November 24, 2016 - 05:51 PM

Then I decided to try an experiment using the MIG welder to see if I could weld a couple of beads of weld along the bottom length of the pivot to generate enough heat to make it expand and break loose from the shaft - I wanted to concentrate the heat in the pivot area and not allow it to travel and reach the nylon bushing in the ear so I clamped a pair of vise grips to the shaft to act as a heat sink and I also placed a water soaked rag over the ear where the bushing was to keep it cool.  I clamped a pair of vise grips on the arm at the front of the shaft and another pair on the pivot to hold them and welded two beads of weld along the bottom of the support - tried to turn the pivot on the shaft but it was still seized to the shaft.  So I ground the weld back off the pivot and got the MAP gas torch out.  I heated the pivot up for about five minutes and tried to turn it on the shaft but it was still seized so I sprayed the pivot with cold water and then heated it up again for about five minutes and then sprayed it with cold water again and let it sit for a minute.  Then I tried to rotate the pivot and felt a tiny bit of movement which made me happy.  Worked it back and forth about five minutes and kept getting a little bit more movement as I worked it and sprayed it with WD40 and eventually was able to move it sideways on the shaft and then I worked the WD40 into the pivot better and eventually it came off the shaft.  Something I found out was the hole where the lever spring goes is right through to the shaft so if your pivot is hard to move you could try working some oil into the spring hole area as it may help loosen it.  Once the pivot was out of the road I was able to clean up that area of the shaft with the wire brush and remove the shaft from the column - got the roll pin out of the shaft where the idler goes and was then able to remove the idler.  Someone had welded a washer on the rear of the idler which wore the shaft at the roll pin location so it will need to be built up - ground the weld off the washer and removed it and then the bushings in the idler as well as the bushings in the steering column ear and the front support.  The hole that the tensioner spring hooks to has a couple of grooves worn in it from years of use.  I built the worn areas on the shaft and the idler up with weld and then sanded the welds - used the carbide burr on the inside of the idler hole and they were repaired.  Cleaned up the steering column with the wire brush and found the grease fitting at the bottom under a bunch of baked on gunk - removed the fitting and ran a drill bit through the hole to clean out the solid crud that was stuck in the hole.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Washers Slid Ahead On Shaft To Bushing Location.jpg
  • 2 Wet Rag On Bushing And Vise Grips Clamped On Rod To Act As Heat Sink.jpg
  • 3 Beads Of Weld On Bottom Of Pivot To Create Heat.jpg
  • 4 Weld Sanded Back Off.jpg
  • 5 Pivot Moving And Worked Back.jpg
  • 6 Remains Of Crud On Shaft.jpg
  • 7 Washer Has Been Welded To Idler Shaft.jpg
  • 8 Roll Pin Area Ground Flat.jpg
  • 9 Roll Pin Removed.jpg
  • 10 Bushings From Idler Arm Steering Column And Front Shaft Support Removed.jpg
  • 11 Front Shaft Support.jpg
  • 12 PTO Pivot Cleaned Up.jpg
  • 13 Groove In Hole On Idler Worn By Idler Spring.jpg
  • 14 PTO SHaft Needs To Be Built Up Where Roll Pin Hole Is.jpg
  • 15 Grease Fitting At Bottom Of Steering Column.jpg

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#98 29 Chev ONLINE  

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Posted November 24, 2016 - 05:52 PM

Once that was done I cleaned up some more parts and painted them.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 More Parts Painted.jpg
  • 2 More Parts Painted.jpg

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#99 Chubien OFFLINE  

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Posted November 24, 2016 - 06:15 PM

When these PTO pivots seize they are really difficult to free up!
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#100 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted November 24, 2016 - 06:22 PM

Then I decided to try an experiment using the MIG welder to see if I could weld a couple of beads of weld along the bottom length of the pivot to generate enough heat to make it expand and break loose from the shaft - I wanted to concentrate the heat in the pivot area and not allow it to travel and reach the nylon bushing in the ear so I clamped a pair of vise grips to the shaft to act as a heat sink and I also placed a water soaked rag over the ear where the bushing was to keep it cool.  I clamped a pair of vise grips on the arm at the front of the shaft and another pair on the pivot to hold them and welded two beads of weld along the bottom of the support - tried to turn the pivot on the shaft but it was still seized to the shaft.  So I ground the weld back off the pivot and got the MAP gas torch out.  I heated the pivot up for about five minutes and tried to turn it on the shaft but it was still seized so I sprayed the pivot with cold water and then heated it up again for about five minutes and then sprayed it with cold water again and let it sit for a minute.  Then I tried to rotate the pivot and felt a tiny bit of movement which made me happy.  Worked it back and forth about five minutes and kept getting a little bit more movement as I worked it and sprayed it with WD40 and eventually was able to move it sideways on the shaft and then I worked the WD40 into the pivot better and eventually it came off the shaft.  Something I found out was the hole where the lever spring goes is right through to the shaft so if your pivot is hard to move you could try working some oil into the spring hole area as it may help loosen it.  Once the pivot was out of the road I was able to clean up that area of the shaft with the wire brush and remove the shaft from the column - got the roll pin out of the shaft where the idler goes and was then able to remove the idler.  Someone had welded a washer on the rear of the idler which wore the shaft at the roll pin location so it will need to be built up - ground the weld off the washer and removed it and then the bushings in the idler as well as the bushings in the steering column ear and the front support.  The hole that the tensioner spring hooks to has a couple of grooves worn in it from years of use.  I built the worn areas on the shaft and the idler up with weld and then sanded the welds - used the carbide burr on the inside of the idler hole and they were repaired.  Cleaned up the steering column with the wire brush and found the grease fitting at the bottom under a bunch of baked on gunk - removed the fitting and ran a drill bit through the hole to clean out the solid crud that was stuck in the hole.

Good job getting that loose!


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#101 29 Chev ONLINE  

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Posted November 25, 2016 - 03:40 PM

The PTO pivots can become really attached to the shaft if the tractors are left outside and neglected - I am surprised that they did not put a bushing inside the pivot but they probably did not give much problem as long as the tractor was looked after.

 

Got the parts that were still attached to the transmission cover removed and things cleaned up - the only thing that gave a problem was the shaft for the Hi / Lo lever as it had become seized in the lever tube but a bit of heat from the torch fixed that problem.  There was a groove worn in the front of the cover where the rear panel had made contact with it over the years so I welded the groove in and sanded the weld smooth.  Then I did some rough clean up with the wire brush, sanded and washed off some more parts and got them painted.  I was quite surprised that the knob for the parking brake unthreaded off of the brake rod by hand - the one on the transmission lever was happy to stay where it was and I decided to leave it alone and left the upper retainer on the shaft and painted them that way by supporting the lever with a wire. 

Attached Thumbnails

  • .5 Parts Still Attached To Cover.jpg
  • .7 Groove Worn In Cover.jpg
  • 1 Transmission Cover Cleaned Up.jpg
  • 2 Transmission Cover Cleaned Up Bottom.jpg
  • 3 Parts From Cover.jpg
  • 4 Groove In Cover Welded And Sanded.jpg
  • 5 Parts Painted.jpg
  • 6 Shift Lever Painted.jpg
  • 7 Hi Lo Lever And Shaft Painted.jpg
  • 8 Transmission Cover Painted.jpg

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#102 29 Chev ONLINE  

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Posted November 28, 2016 - 02:56 PM

I decided that if I was going to repair the cracks and missing chunks in the centre hub underneath the steering wheel it would be a lot easier to work on the wheel without the steering shaft attached - I was not looking forward to removing the shaft as I was pretty sure the shaft and the wheel which had been a happy couple for so long would not like to be separated and I was right.  I tried to remove the nut using an offset six point 9/16" wrench because I wanted to make sure I could see the nut and make sure it was turning on the thread and not trying to twist the thread off.  I could not get the nut to move on the thread so I used the mig welder and welded a bead of weld around the outer hex of the nut in short intervals and cooling the weld quickly with cold water as I did not want things getting too hot and melting the plastic on the wheel.  I made sure I stayed at the outer edge of the nut and tired not to get any weld on the threaded part - once I had welded all around the nut I set another 3/8" nut on top and welded it to the welded area of the first nut leaving two flats of the nut with very little weld so I could get an open end wrench on them - again I welded a little bit and then cooled things with cold water.  The heat and cooling created the desired affect and the nut started to turn and I unthreaded the nut with a 9/16" open end wrench.  Then I wire brushed the steering shaft and got a worn out gear and collar with a 3/4" bore that I had kept and slid it over the shaft to act as a spacer so when I used the puller I would be pulling on the metal centre of the steering wheel and not on the plastic.  I put the bearing splitter up against the bottom of the gear and ran two pieces of 3/8" threaded rod to the puller (I had threaded a 3/8" nut on the end of the shaft so I did not damage the threads with the nose of the puller) and tried to remove the wheel but it was rusted on as well and I ended up bending the threaded end of the shaft so I stopped and formulated a new approach to getting the shaft out of the wheel as I knew if I kept going using the puller I would eventually do more damage to the threaded end.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Pieces Broken Out Of Bottom And Cracks.jpg
  • 2 Cracks On Top And Seized Nut.jpg
  • 3 Nut Wire Brushed.jpg
  • 4 Nut Welded Around Edge And Cooled WIth Cold Water.jpg
  • 5 New Nut Welded On Top.jpg
  • 6 Nut Threaded Off.jpg
  • 7 Nut After Removed.jpg
  • 8 Worn Out Gear WIth Three Quarter Inch Bore.jpg
  • 9 Steering Shaft Cleaned Up With Wire Brush.jpg
  • 10 Old Gear Slid Over Shaft To Act As A Spacer.jpg
  • 11 Threaded End Of Shaft Bent Using Pulling.jpg

Edited by 29 Chev, November 28, 2016 - 07:22 PM.

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#103 29 Chev ONLINE  

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Posted November 28, 2016 - 03:26 PM

I did a bit of thinking and decided the steering shaft was much stronger and bigger at the other end so I did a one eighty in my thought process so to speak.  I got a 1/2" grade 5 bolt that was discarded from another project that the head had already been cut off, ground a "V" in the end and welded it to the bottom of the steering shaft - left enough of the end of the shaft showing so I would know where to cut the bolt off when I was done.  I took a piece of the 1" square tubing that I had cut off the tractor where the motor was mounted and slid it over the end of the steering shaft up against the old gear collar (gotta love it when your tractor comes with parts to make a steering wheel puller - didn't even have to change the length of the square tube) and put four flat washers over the bolt and threaded on a 1/2" nut to the bolt and tightened it up - used a large adjustable to hold the tube while I tightened the nut with a wrench.  Once I had the nut as tight as I could get it I held the shaft in one hand and hit the collar where the gear was welded on with a large ball peen hammer several times - turning the shaft as I hit the collar and making sure I did not hit the plastic of the wheel.  Then I set things back down and retightened the nut and repeated the process - it took about six cycles but eventually the wheel let go of the shaft and started to move.  It moved a bit more but was being stubborn and I think the woodruff key was binding against the gear collar a bit so I loosened the nut off and had a look at the bottom of the steering wheel hub and repositioned the keyway in the collar so it aligned with the key in the shaft and tightened things back up again and the wheel came off.  I threaded a 3/8" UNC nut on to the end of the bent threads, supported the nut and hit the shaft with a hammer where the key was to straighten the threads back up again - got them pretty much straight and then ran a 3/8" die over the threads. I mushroomed the key a bit on the ends when I pulled the wheel and also on the sides where I hit it when I straightened the threads so I built the key up a bit with the mig welder so I could catch the weld with a punch and removed the key.  Then I cut the bolt that I had welded on back off with the hack saw and sanded the end of the shaft to clean it up.       

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Half Inch Bolt With Head Cut Off.jpg
  • 2 Square Tubing That Was Used To Hold Engine.jpg
  • 3 End Of Bolt Ground In V.jpg
  • 4 Bolt Welded On To End Of Steering Shaft.jpg
  • 5 Bolt Welded On To End Of Steering Shaft.jpg
  • 6 Square Tubing Slid Over Shaft.jpg
  • 7 Nut And Flat Washers In Place.jpg
  • 8 Steering Wheel Starting To Move.jpg
  • 9 Hit Where Gear Is Welded To Collar.jpg
  • 10 Wheel Removed.jpg
  • 11 Threaded End Of Steering Shaft.jpg
  • 12 Threaded End Straightened And Key Built Up WIth Weld And Cooled.jpg
  • 13 Key Removed.jpg
  • 14 Bolt Cut Off Bottom Of Shaft And End Sanded.jpg
  • 15 Old Key.jpg

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#104 29 Chev ONLINE  

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Posted November 28, 2016 - 03:34 PM

With the shaft cleaned up I used the wire brush and the 3" cut off blade in the drill to roughen up the plastic where the chunks were missing in the centre underneath and groove out the cracks in the wheel - will have to make some forms and get some fresh JB Weld later this week.  Then I masked the shifter, hi / lo lever and mounted the parking brake knob on a 3/8" UNC bolt and gave them a coat of red paint. 

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Cracks In Steering Wheel Grooved Out.jpg
  • 2 Cracks In Steering Wheel Grooved Out.jpg
  • 3 Centre Area Roughed Up WIth Wire Brush.jpg
  • 4 Drill With Cutoff Blade Used To Groove Out Cracks.jpg
  • 5 Knobs Painted Red.jpg

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#105 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted November 28, 2016 - 05:50 PM

Good way to pull a steering wheel!


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