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Bolens 1053 Return to Service Project


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#31 29 Chev ONLINE  

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Posted November 03, 2016 - 04:30 PM

Then I tackled fixing the broken ear that holds the hitch pin to keep the free wheeling pin in place.  I used a copper pipe joiner and slit it endways with a hack saw.  Spread the joiner apart to make it bigger and did a test fit in the hole.   It looked good so I ground the base of where the ear broke and then used the mig welder and built up the two sides and then filled in the top with weld to recreate the ear.  Once things it cooled I ground and shaped the weld and pried out most of the copper joiner - a bit of it stuck to the weld.  Took a round file and filed the inside of the weld to remove the rest of the copper and resize the hole so the pin would slide through nicely.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Hub Missing Ear.jpg
  • 2 Copper Pipe Sleeve Slit With Hacksaw.jpg
  • 3 Sleeve Spread And Test Fit.jpg
  • 4 Base Of Ear Ground To CLean Up.jpg
  • 5 Ready To Start Welding.jpg
  • 6 Sides Built Up With Weld.jpg
  • 7 Welded Across Top.jpg
  • 8 Weld Ground And Copper Sleeve Removed.jpg
  • 9 Little Bit Of Copper Stuck To Weld Inside Hole.jpg
  • 10 Hole Cleaned Up With Round File.jpg
  • 11 Hole Cleaned Up With File.jpg
  • 12 Pin In Hole.jpg
  • 13 Pin In Hole.jpg

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#32 fonz3482 OFFLINE  

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Posted November 03, 2016 - 05:02 PM

You do great work sir! Can't wait to see the final product!


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#33 Bruce Dorsi OFFLINE  

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Posted November 03, 2016 - 05:12 PM

Nice job on that hub ! :thumbs:

 

Your pics and text will help a lot of people that have never been inside the transaxle.

 

Thanks for taking the time to document your project.  :worshippy1:


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#34 29 Chev ONLINE  

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Posted November 03, 2016 - 05:43 PM

Nice job on that hub ! :thumbs:

 

Your pics and text will help a lot of people that have never been inside the transaxle.

 

Thanks for taking the time to document your project.  :worshippy1:

Thanks for the kind words.

 

I don't ever remember seeing pictures of a tube frame rear axle removed so I thought I would document the transmission repair and take lots of pictures as it may help someone else.

 

The hub is not perfect and perhaps I should have put it in the lathe to clean up the weld but since the only time the outer hub turns on it is when the tractor is in free wheeling I think it should work fine with the weld cleaned up the way it is.  I figure the worst that can happen is the hub may crack again at the keyway or weld but the outer hub forms a collar around it to give it a lot of strength and keep any cracks from spreading apart very much.  There should not be a whole lot of stress on the ear as all it has to do is keep the pin from moving sideways - I welded a new ear on a 1050 hub the same way over two years ago and it is still holding up well.   


Edited by 29 Chev, November 03, 2016 - 05:43 PM.

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#35 Chubien OFFLINE  

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Posted November 03, 2016 - 07:04 PM

Very informative, thanks for taking the time to document all your great work.

#36 propane1 ONLINE  

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Posted November 03, 2016 - 08:15 PM

Wow, because I am an armature welder, with no training what so ever, I am very interested in what type of metal you were welding to. And just regular mig welding wire was used.
Could this be done with gas torch and steel rod.
That looks amazing. Wow again.

Noel

#37 29 Chev ONLINE  

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Posted November 04, 2016 - 09:32 AM

Wow, because I am an armature welder, with no training what so ever, I am very interested in what type of metal you were welding to. And just regular mig welding wire was used.
Could this be done with gas torch and steel rod.
That looks amazing. Wow again.

Noel

Thanks for the kind words - I am strictly an amateur self taught welder with no formal training other than what was taught in high school back in the early 70's and what I picked up from my dad - Oxygen / Acetylene and A/C stick welding.  Back then he was the neighbourhood welder and he used to bronze any cast pieces back together using gas (oxygen / acetylene) and bronze rod after grinding the surfaces to get them clean.  The transmission casing and the hub are cast iron I believe and if you research welding cast iron on the web you will find that cast iron can consist of a variety of metals in various percentages.  I have found that the cast iron parts used on the tube frame tractors from the late 60's and early 70's seem to weld nicely using the mig welder with regular .025" steel wire and Argoshield gas (I use what is called Argoshield light) which is a mixture of Argon and CO2.  I do not know if you can weld cast with a gas torch and steel rod - if you research on the web you will find there is a lot of varying opinions on welding cast and whether it has to be preheated and what materials to use. I believe one of the secrets is to keep the heat low and not try to weld for any amount of time before you let things cool and to let things cool naturally.  I think that is one of the reasons the mig welder works as it uses very small diameter wire which does not generate a lot of heat.  I am not sure how strong the welding I did is but as I stated on the transmission case I was trying to add some strength but also build up the areas to create a new wear surface if something rubbed it.  In the case of the hub the welding on the crack at the keyway may crack again but the area is sleeved by the outer hub so it should not crack any worse than it did the first time and the tab does not require much strength as all it has to do is to keep a clip in position so the drive pin stays engaged - usually when the tab breaks most people just put a hose clamp around the hub and tighten it to hold the pin in.  Most people would view the hub as broken and have probably replaced it with a good used one - I do not have another hub and it will be interesting to check it in a year or two and see if the weld at the keyway broke or stood up.  I have attached a picture of the parts break down so you can see how the inner hub (#8) and outer hub (#6) go together better - #9 is the clip and # 11 is the free wheeling pin.          

Attached Thumbnails

  • 14 Parts Break Down.jpg

Edited by 29 Chev, November 04, 2016 - 09:33 AM.

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#38 propane1 ONLINE  

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Posted November 04, 2016 - 10:20 AM

Thanks for the reply. I too learned with torches from my dad, then years later stared using stick, then mig. What amperage did you use to do the welding. We have a small mig welder. It's only 35 or 75 amp setting. And it uses gas with it. My son is good with the mig, I seem better with the stick. Gas torches I can weld most things with. My favorite.

Noel

#39 29 Chev ONLINE  

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Posted November 04, 2016 - 11:33 AM

I use a Lincoln 140 110 volt 15 amp mig welder http://www.canadiant...88040p.html#srp - I had the heat setting on C and wire feed on 4.  If you were going to try and weld cast I would suggest using the lowest heat setting that it will weld at.  I used to use do a lot of brazing when I patched up my car floors and body panels - got my first mig back in 86 and fell in love with it - quicker than torches and I find I can do a lot of things with it such as removing twisted off bolts.  Very seldom use torches anymore except for heating and brazing the odd carb throttle shaft that is worn.  Once I had a screw broken off inside a rear wheel opening insert where the locking rod pivoted on a 80 Pontiac Parisienne and debated on how to remove the screw as I did not want to try and drill the screw out from the fibreglass / plastic insert.  Drilled a very small hole in the side of the well that the screw was in so I could use a finishing nail held with a pair of visegrips to make contact with the screw to provide a ground, wrapped a wet rag around the outside of the well to keep it cool and built up the end of the screw enough that I could grab onto it with a pair of vise grips and threaded it out.


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#40 propane1 ONLINE  

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Posted November 04, 2016 - 11:44 AM

I had a 67 vw Beatle, that I was brazing and using steel rods on, a lot. Fixin rusty old cars all the time, as my father use to say.

Noel
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#41 29 Chev ONLINE  

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Posted November 05, 2016 - 02:48 PM

Got the axle polished up - still has a few marks in it but should work fine.  Then I found a new clip for the free wheeling pin and tried it in the groove on the hub - had to grind a little bit more off of the inside of the ear where the groove is to get it to fit.  Tried the hub on the cleaned up axle and it fits on nicely so I set them aside for now and moved on to the transmission case.  Noticed it was starting to rust a bit so I gave it one more scrub with varsol on the inside and outside to remove any grinding dust from when I ground the welding I did on the case, flushed it with water and blew it dry again with compressed air.  Put a little oil on the needle bearings and bearing cup and washed the case off with some paint thinners I had, masked off the surfaces that I didn't want paint on, washed it off one more time with paint thinners and gave it a paint job with some Krylon Ivory paint that I believe comes pretty close to the original colour. 

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Axle Polished Up.jpg
  • 2 Axle Polished Up.jpg
  • 3 Hub With Pin And New Clip.jpg
  • 4 Hub With Pin And New Clip.jpg
  • 5 Case Cleaned Up And Masked.jpg
  • 6 Case Cleaned Up And Masked.jpg
  • 7 Case Cleaned Up And Masked.jpg
  • 8 Case Cleaned Up And Masked.jpg
  • 9 Ivory Paint.jpg
  • 10 Case Painted.jpg
  • 11 Case Painted.jpg
  • 12 Case Painted.jpg
  • 13 Case Painted.jpg
  • 14 Case Painted.jpg

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#42 29 Chev ONLINE  

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Posted November 05, 2016 - 02:53 PM

Once the paint was dry I removed the masking tape.  Then I used my homemade tool to remove the two needle bearings inside the three gear cluster as I am going to try and build up the worn part of the teeth on the 15 tooth gear with the mig welder - this should give the gear a new wear surface if someone accidently happens to grind the gears. 

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Case Unmasked.jpg
  • 2 Case Unmasked.jpg
  • 3 Case Unmasked.jpg
  • 4 Case Unmasked.jpg
  • 5 Case Unmasked.jpg
  • 6 Case Unmasked.jpg
  • 7 Case Unmasked.jpg
  • 1 Needle Bearings Pressed Out Of Cluster.jpg
  • 2 Home Made Tool.jpg
  • 3 15 Tooth Gear Worn From Grinding.jpg

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#43 propane1 ONLINE  

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Posted November 05, 2016 - 03:12 PM

Can't wait to see the repair on the gear teeth.

Noel
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#44 ClassicBolens ONLINE  

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Posted November 05, 2016 - 08:59 PM

Looks great so far. Ditto on the cluster gear teeth repair. 


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#45 Swalker ONLINE  

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Posted November 06, 2016 - 07:34 AM

Great work. This is an awesome thread and I can't wait to see it all done. I loved the welding and the amount of detail you put into the thread. It's going to feel good when you fire it up and drive ut around the yard.
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