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Bolens 1053 Return to Service Project


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#376 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted May 25, 2017 - 04:39 PM

I was hesitant to modify the piston but after checking with Brian and learning that he was not having any luck finding one that had the curved skirt areas I made a decision.  The parts game is fun as the person selling the parts is always caught in the middle as they are the manufacturers representitive and did not make or package the part but are the first to hear any complaints if the product does not fit or meet the expectations of the customer.  I want to state for the record that Brian supplied the part in good faith expecting that I would have no problems installing it and when he found out I had a problem he tried desparately to find one that had the correct profile but unfortunatley the piston is no longer being manufactured by Wisconsin.  My concern with modifying the piston was that it could affect the balance of the piston if the exact same amount was not removed from both sides but after talking to the machine shop manager where I had sent the engine and a gentleman at Wisconsin I felt that I could modify the piston and it should still function fine.  Both gentleman were in agreement that where the material was being removed would not have any affect on the way the piston functioned and having a little bit more or less material removed on one side versus the other would not be critical.  After I thought about it and noticed that the Wisconsin name and part number were cast on the inside of one side only and there was no offsetting weight cast into the other side I felt better and as both gentleman also pointed out the odds of me finding another piston that had the correct profile were not good.  So it was either modify the piston or else leave the engine in pieces and I decided to modify the piston using what seemed like a logical approach to me.  


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#377 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted May 25, 2017 - 05:00 PM

I saw that both the old and new piston had a 3/4" wide casting groove on the insides of the thrust area so I made a 3/4" wide strip out of cardboard that I could set in the grooves and mark the bottom edge of the piston skirt to index the old and new pistons.  Once the pistons were marked at the grooves this gave me four marks that I could line up and give me an accurate reference.  Since the new piston was .010" oversize and the orignal was a worn std size I went around the outside of the orignal piston with a layer of masking tape in two locations to increase the diameter of the old piston - the masking tape got me to within .001" of the new piston.  Then I cut out a piece of cardboard and wrapped it around the orignal piston and taped it at the join to create a form.  I then marked the four index marks and the curved sides onto the form - once i had them marked I rotated the form 180 degrees to make sure the marks still lined up.  Things looked good so I slid the old piston out from inside the form, cut out the two sides where the curved marks were using a pair of aviation snips and then slid the form onto the new piston. Once the form was indexed and flush the same as I had positioned it on the old piston I then marked the side of the piston with a pen along the curve, rotated the form 180 degrees and saw if things lined up.  Everything looked good so I rotated the form back 180 degrees and scribed the side of the piston with a very small flat screwdriver as I knew the ink line would disappear as I handled the piston and I wanted a nice crisp mark to follow as I removed the piston material.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Casting Groove In Piston In Line WIth Rod.jpg
  • 2 Three Quarter Inch Piece Of Cardboard To Mark Skirt Of Old Piston.jpg
  • 3 Bottom Of Skirt Marked.jpg
  • 4 New Piston Marked.jpg
  • 5 Layer Of Masking Tape On Old Piston.jpg
  • 6 Cardboard Wrapped Around Old Piston To Mark Pattern.jpg
  • 7 Cardboard Wrapped Around Old Piston To Mark Pattern.jpg
  • 8 Cardboard Wrapped Around Old Piston To Mark Pattern.jpg
  • 9 Cardboard Form Removed From Old Piston.jpg
  • 10 Cardboard Form Removed From Old Piston.jpg
  • 11 Form Cut Along Marks With Aviation Snips.jpg
  • 12 Form Cut Along Marks With Aviation Snips.jpg
  • 13 Form On New Piston And Indexed To Skirt Marks.jpg
  • 14 Form On New Piston And Indexed To Skirt Marks.jpg
  • 15 Sides Of Piston Scribed With Small Flat Screwdriver.jpg
  • 16 Sides Of Piston Scribed With Small Flat Screwdriver.jpg

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#378 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted May 25, 2017 - 06:13 PM

With the piston now marked I removed the cardboard form and also removed the snap rings and pressed out the wrist pin which allowed me to remove the connecting rod.  Since my plan was to sand the side material away I knew there would be grinding dust and the piston would be very hard to clean with the rod in place and there was also a good possiblity grinding debris would enter into the oil hole at the top of the rod and contaminate the rod and wrist pin area.  With the rod out of the way I moved outdoors to take advantage of the lighting and fresh air.  I used my air powered angle die grinder with a 2" 36 grit roloc sanding disc to remove the unwanted material - I thought about using the 4-1/2" angle drinder and a 36 grit flap wheel but I was concerned that the larger diameter disc would be hard to control since the grinder is electric and the speed cannot be varied and the larger disc would also be harder to get into the curved area of the side of the piston to shape the curve smoothly.  After about twenty minutes I had the sides shaped to within 3/16" of the scribed lines - I took my time and held the piston in my one hand as I worked away on removing the material.  Holding the piston in my hand allowed me to tell how warm the piston was getting as I removed the material - if I felt the psiton getting really warm I switched to the other side or took a little break as I wanted to keep the piston from getting too hot.  I finished sanding the material away on the sides down to the line and then I washed the piston a couple of times to remove any sanding debris.  Then I slid the form back on and checked to see how the new profile matched the form - things looked good so I rotated the form 180 degrees and had another look.  Things looked good so I used my vernier and measured the distance from the top of the piston to the highest part of the curve on both sides to see how close they were - once side was about .004" higher than the other which made me happy.  I used a round file to dress the lip so there were no sharp edges where I had sanded and then I used a piece of 120 grit sandpaper to give the bottom edge a final sand to smooth it up and then I checked the highest area at the curves again with the vernier and there was a difference of .001" so I washed the piston a couple of more times and then installed the wrist pin, rod and snap rings again.  Once that was done I installed the rod on the crank and verified the piston would now clear the crank throws which it did.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Wrist Pin And Rod Removed.jpg
  • 2 Air Powered Angle Die Grinder With Two Inch 36 Grit Sanding Disc.jpg
  • 3 About Three Sixteenths Inch Material Left To Remove.jpg
  • 4 Lots Of Grinding Debris.jpg
  • 5 About Three Sixteenths Inch Material Left To Remove.jpg
  • 6 Sanding Completed And Piston Washed Up.jpg
  • 7 Checking Piston Against Form.jpg
  • 8 Checking Piston Against Form.jpg
  • 9 Skirt Lip Filed And Sanded.jpg
  • 10 Skirt Lip Filed And Sanded.jpg
  • 11 Skirt Lip Filed And Sanded.jpg
  • 12 Skirt Lip Filed And Sanded.jpg
  • 13 Wrist Pin And Rod Back On Piston.jpg
  • 14 Wrist Pin And Rod Back On Piston.jpg

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#379 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted May 25, 2017 - 06:30 PM

Then I removed the rod from the crank, installed the rings on the piston, put the crank back in the engine and installed the flywheel, washer and nut, installed the ring compressor and after making sure the rod was orinted properly I installed the piston back in the bore.  I had lubricated the bore, piston, rod and crank journal again with new motor oil before I put the piston in so I tapped the piston down and guided the rod onto the crank journal - this time it seated and the piston cleared so I installed the rod cap (after putting new oil on it), locks and rod bolts makng sure the arrows on the rod aligned and were to the right of the crank when looking through the opening.  I snugged the rod bolts up with a 1/2" wrench and then rotated the crank so that the piston was at top dead centre as this allowed me access with the socket and torque wrench to torque the rod bolts.  I torqued them both to 12 ft/lbs initially and then to 22 ft/lbs as per the specifications in the book.  Once that was done I bent the tabs on the lock washers against the bolt heads to keep the bolts from turning and turned the crank a complete revolution while supporting the rear of the crank to make sure everything turned freely and nothing hit.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Piston And Rod Installed And Ready To Torque.jpg
  • 2 Piston At Bottom Dead centre.jpg
  • 3 Crank Rotated to Allow Room For Torque Wrench.jpg
  • 4 Close Up Of Rod Bolt.jpg
  • 5 Close Up Of Other Rod Bolt And Notches On Rod Aligned.jpg
  • 6 Torquing Rod Bolt.jpg
  • 7 Torquing Other Rod Bolt.jpg
  • 8 Locking Tab Against Rod Bolt Head.jpg
  • 9 Locking Tab Against Other Rod Bolt Head.jpg
  • 10 Crank At Top Dead Centre.jpg
  • 11 Crank At Top Dead Centre.jpg

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#380 Dave in NY OFFLINE  

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Posted May 25, 2017 - 08:17 PM

You are very creative! I'm sure your fix for this problem will work just fine.


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#381 TomLGT195 OFFLINE  

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Posted May 26, 2017 - 04:05 AM

Nice job, looking good. You may have to change your signature now too. Adding " Now restoring Wisconsin's one engine at a time too!"


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#382 Mark 149 J. ONLINE  

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Posted May 26, 2017 - 09:25 AM

I liked how you made your pattern for the piston skirt.  The piston looked as good as the one that came out of the engine.  Can't wait to hear what it sounds like when you get it all back together.  Should last another 40 plus years!


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#383 Husky ONLINE  

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Posted May 26, 2017 - 02:41 PM

So was the weld repair on cast iron? I heard cast can be welded with a mig welder. Nice job on the gear case you really do good work.
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#384 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted May 26, 2017 - 04:31 PM

So was the weld repair on cast iron? I heard cast can be welded with a mig welder.

If you are referring to the welding I did to build up the area where a tiller driveshaft had rubbed on the axle housing on the rear end it was cast iron.


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#385 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted May 26, 2017 - 04:39 PM

Got the camshaft and governor gear cleaned up and noticed that the arm for the spoiler cam appeared to have a rough edge where the spoiler piece turned so I filed and cleaned up the edge with some 120 grit sandpaper.  The spoiler cam appeared to be binding a little but once I smoothed up the edge and cleaned everything up and coated the pieces with new oil everything moved freely.  There is a slight wear mark on the arm of the spring but I am going to take a chance on it.  I double checked the operation of the spoiler cam once everything was put back together and things loooked good so I set it aside and cleaned up the tappets.  Just to satisfy my own curiosity I measured the two tappets from the bottom to the top withthe vernier caliper and they were within .001".  When I cleaned them up I noticed they had the # 47 stamped in them which I assume is either a casting or production run #.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Cam And Governor Gear Cleaned Up.jpg
  • 2 Slight Wear Mark On Spring.jpg
  • 3 Hole For Spoiler Cam.jpg
  • 4 Rough Edge On Arm.jpg
  • 5 Rough Edge Filed And Sanded.jpg
  • 6 Arm Back On Cam.jpg
  • 7 Arm In Running Position.jpg
  • 8 Spoiler Cam In Start Position.jpg
  • 9 Spoiler Cam In Run Position.jpg
  • 10 Retainer Clip For Govenor Gear And Pin for Points.jpg
  • 11 Tappet Heights.jpg
  • 12 No 47 On Tappets.jpg

Edited by 29 Chev, May 26, 2017 - 04:40 PM.

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#386 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted May 26, 2017 - 04:56 PM

I installed the tappets in the block and rather than rotating the block I slipped an oring onto each one to hold them in position until I had the the camshaft installed.  I tried the governor gear on the shaft that it runs on after I lubricated them both with new motor oil and it turned nicely.  I had removed the small wire snap ring that holds the gear in place on the shaft before I sent the block to the machine shop so it was installed back in the shaft groove and then I pushed the governor gear on to the shaft and felt it lock in place over the snap ring - there is a groove on the inside of the governor gear bore it slips into.  Then I installed the pin that pushes against the cam lobe to open the points in its hole and installed the camshaft and made sure it meshed with the governor gear and then I checked to make sure the timing marks on the crank gear and the camgear were aligned as per the manual - there is a dot cast into the cam gear and the edges of the crankshaft gear it aligns with are rounded.  Cleaned up the spring for the camshaft and then dipped one end in some grease and dobbed the grease into the hole in the rear cover where the camshaft runs to hold the ball in place during the cover installation.  I left the bit of grease on the end of the spring and inserted it into the hole in the end of the camshaft.  I drove the two dowel pins in the rear cover in so they protruded about 1/8" and then after I cleaned the ball up I pushed it into the dob of grease in the cover - I tilted the cover a little bit to see if the ball would stay put and it did.  I cleaned up the six cover bolts and applied a thin film of oil on the surface of the cover where the gasket goes to hold the gasket in place as per the manual. 

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Tappets Installed And Held In Place With O Rings.jpg
  • 2 Tappets Installed.jpg
  • 3 Groove In Governor Shaft For Snap Ring.jpg
  • 4 Snap Ring Installed In Groove.jpg
  • 5 Governor Gear And Camshaft Installed.jpg
  • 6 Aligning Timing Marks In Crank And Cam Gear.jpg
  • 7 Close Up Of Timing Marks.jpg
  • 8 Spring For End Of Camshaft.jpg
  • 9 Spring Installed In Camshaft.jpg
  • 10 Ball That Goes Against Spring In Camshaft.jpg
  • 11 Dowels Protruding Through About One Eighth Inch.jpg
  • 12 Cover Bolts Cleaned Up.jpg

Edited by 29 Chev, May 26, 2017 - 05:20 PM.

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#387 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted May 26, 2017 - 05:17 PM

I installed the rear cover gasket and started the cover onto the end of the camshaft and made sure the gears stayed in alignment.  Everything looked good so I started the six cover bolts and snugged them up hand tight.  Then I used a punch to drive the two dowels into the holes in the block and then I torqued the cover bolts to 8 ft/lbs as per the manual in a circular pattern around the outer edge.  I had a lazy on so rather than walk to the other shop to get the micometer torque wrench I usually use I used the 40 year old beam style that I got with my first Gray tool set I bought back in 1977.  Then I rotated the crankshaft by hand a few revolutions to make sure the tappets moved ( especially the exhaust tappet when it rides up on the spoiler cam) and everything turned smoothly.  As you will notice I have not installed the crankshaft seals yet as I think not having them in place made it easier to install the crankshaft and the rear cover as I did not have to try and align the crank with them as I was installing the crank in the front bearing cap or when I was lining up the rear cover and camshaft while making sure the seal lips did not get hung up or torn.  Before I install them I will check the crankshaft end play and I can give the front and rear bearings one last squirt of oil just before I install the seals.  I am thinking about using the electronic ignition set up rather than points and condensor to create spark so I just installed the screws for the points and condensor as well as the stud that holds the cover in place in the points box for now to seal up the holes.  Then I put the garbage bag over the engine and called it a day. 

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Ready To Install Cover.jpg
  • 2 Cover Set In Place On Cam And Cover Bolts Started.jpg
  • 3 Cover Installed And Bolts Torqued.jpg
  • 4 Orings Removed Off Tappets.jpg
  • 5 40 Year Old Torque Wrench.jpg
  • 6 Stud And Screws Installed In Points Box.jpg
  • 7 Engine Covered Back Up.jpg

Edited by 29 Chev, May 30, 2017 - 03:51 PM.

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#388 nkaust ONLINE  

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Posted May 27, 2017 - 09:35 PM

well when you get done you'll have a brand new tractor, which the tractor you are working on, probably lasted someone 30+ years with neglect, but with you i think it will last a lifetime, good work man


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#389 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted May 29, 2017 - 07:48 PM

Got a little bit more done today.  I removed the flywheel and torqued the three bolts that retain the front bearing cap to 8 ft/ lbs as per the manual, put the flywheel back on and installed the washer and nut and hand tightened the nut.  Then I checked the crankshaft end play using the dial gauge as per the manual.  The manual spec is .001" to .004" and the end play measured .0031" so it is within spec - I thought it might be a little looser given the wear on the engine but apparently the bearings have not worn much over the years of running.  On the off chance that I may use points and condenser I made a couple of new spacers on the lathe from a small piece of the cutting block material I have been using.  Used a 10-32 x 1-1/4" machine screw, drilled a  3/16" diameter in the plastic, threaded the piece on to the screw, tightened a nut against the nylon and chucked the screw in the lathe jaw.  Turned the O.D. of the nylon to about .525" diameter and then used a parting off tool to turn the middle section to .250" forming the shoulder to go through the hole in the points box.  Then I used a hack saw blade to cut the nylon piece into two halves while the lathe turned at slow speed.  Since the machine screw was a snug fit inside the 3/16" diameter hole the two halves turned with the screw as I cut the nylon down to the screw.  Used three flat washers, a lock washer and two nuts to mount the screw and the insulators in the points box hole and then I checked the bolt to make sure it was insulated from the engine using an ohm meter which it was.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Dial Gauge In Place.jpg
  • 2 Crank Pushed Back To Zero Gauge.jpg
  • 3 Gently Prying Flywheel Forward.jpg
  • 4 Reading With Flywheel Gently Pried Ahead.jpg
  • 5 New Insulators Turned On 10 32  Screw.jpg
  • 6 New Insulators Close Up.jpg
  • 7 Two Halves Shoulder Side.jpg
  • 8 Two Halves Washer Side.jpg
  • 9 Washers And One Half Turned On Screw.jpg
  • 10 Shoulder In Hole.jpg
  • 11 Bottom Halve On Screw.jpg
  • 12 Lower Washers And Nuts Installed.jpg

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#390 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted May 30, 2017 - 02:49 PM

Waiting on a few parts for the engine so I started cleaning up and painting the shrouds and some brackets.  Since I am hoping this engine will eventually find its way back on to the 1050 it came off of I decided to paint them the metallic brown that they probably were originally - should make a nice contrast to the ivory of the tractor.  One of the brackets that hold on the fuel tank is broken so I will have to repair it and still have to clean up the fuel tank and paint it.  Got about half the items painted outside and some liquid sunshine moved in so I had to do the mad scramble to get things inside before they got wet.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Parts Painted.jpg
  • 2 Parts Painted.jpg
  • 3 Parts Painted.jpg
  • 4 Parts Painted.jpg
  • 5 Parts Painted.jpg
  • 6 Parts Painted.jpg
  • 7 Parts Painted.jpg
  • 8 Tank Strap Broke.jpg
  • 9 Starting To Clean  Fuel Tank Up.jpg

Edited by 29 Chev, May 30, 2017 - 03:32 PM.

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