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Bolens 1053 Return to Service Project


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#361 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted May 23, 2017 - 05:42 PM

Got a little more done today. Removed the seal from the front bearing plate with a punch, removed the gaskets and shim using a utility knife to separate the gasket from the plate and got them cleaned up.  Someone had used RTV silicone the last time the lower end was assembled and I found a piece of RTV in the oil hole area which would have slowed down the oil passing through the hole - not sure if it made any difference to the life of the front bearing but I mention it as a lot of people tend to apply more than required when using RTV and do not follow the directions properly by letting the RTV cure before tightening things up.  The material that oozes out is a waste of product but the material that oozes in can be a concern if it gets into holes like this.  I had a good look at the bearing cup and it has a nice wear pattern so I think I will take a chance and reuse it.  I installed the bearing retainer in the block using a new gasket on each side of the orignal shim making sure the hole was oriniented in the down position.  I also had a good look at the cylinder and the finish is a lot smoother than what the pictures I posted yesterday reflected.  I used a light inside the bore and took a couple more pictures which show the cross hatch pattern better I think. 

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Front Bearing Retainer.jpg
  • 2 Seal Removed With Punch.jpg
  • 3 Oil Return Hole.jpg
  • 4 RTV Used On Assembly Last Time.jpg
  • 5 Removing Shim WIth Utility Knife.jpg
  • 6 Gasket On Both Sides Of Shim.jpg
  • 7 Parts Cleaned Up.jpg
  • 8 Wear Pattern On Front Bearing Cup.jpg
  • 9 Honing On Cylinder.jpg
  • 10 Honing On Cylinder.jpg
  • 11 New Gasket On Both Sides Of Shim.jpg
  • 12 New Gasket On Both Sides Of Shim.jpg
  • 13 Front Bearing Plate Assy Installed.jpg

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#362 Bruce Dorsi OFFLINE  

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Posted May 23, 2017 - 09:05 PM

Bore looks good !  :thumbs:


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#363 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted May 24, 2017 - 02:47 PM

I checked the ring gap clearance on the rings by inserting them into the cylinder and then pushing them down with the top of the piston to keep them square with the bore - Figure 5 shows the results I got. After they checked out I installed the rings on the piston starting with the oil ring wiper, then the lower retainer ring and upper retainer ring making sure they were offset about an inch either side of the wiper join as per the instructions.  Next came the second ring after aligning it since it has a notch cut in it that goes towards the bottom - I used the method that is shown in the engine manual to start the open ends of the ring on the piston first to install the rings.  After that I installed the top ring and then made sure the ring gaps were at 120 degrees spacing to each other and installed the ring compressor.  I cleaned up the flywheel and made sure the nut still threaded on to the crank ok and then after I lubricated the front bearing cone and cup with new motor oil I placed the crank through the front bearing suppert and set the flywheel on and after installing the washer tightened the nut hand tight as per the manual - the weight of the flywheel helps balance the crank since it is not supported at the pto end.  I used two short pieces of 1/2" plywood between the flywheel and the block to keep the front bearing seated in the cup since I did not install the front seal yet. Once the crank was in place I turned it so the journal was at the bottom and tapped the piston into the bore with a wooden hammer handle after making sure i had the notch on the connecting rod towards the open end of the crankcase - Kept one hand on the ring compressor so that the notches on it stayed seated on the top of the block.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Checking Ring End Gap.jpg
  • 2 Top Ring Inserted Into Bore.jpg
  • 3 Pushing Ring Down In Bore WIth Piston.jpg
  • 4 Checking Top Ring End Gap.jpg
  • 5 End Gap Clearance Results.jpg
  • 6 Oil Ring Installed.jpg
  • 7 Indent In Bottom Of Second Ring.jpg
  • 8 Second Ring Installed.jpg
  • 9 Top Ring Installed.jpg
  • 10 Ring Gaps Offset.jpg
  • 11 Flywheel Cleaned Up.jpg
  • 12 Crank Installed In Block.jpg
  • 13 Flywheel Installed With Nut Hand Tight.jpg
  • 14 Ring Compressor Installed And Ready To Install Piston.jpg
  • 15 Piston In Bore.jpg

Edited by 29 Chev, May 24, 2017 - 03:16 PM.

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#364 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted May 24, 2017 - 03:16 PM

Once the piston was in the bore I gently tapped it down to mate the rod to the crank as they had been lubricated with new engine oil before I started to install the piston.  I made sure the bottom of the rod did not get caught on the sides of the crank throw as i tapped the piston down.  Got things to where the piston skirt was below the bore and encountered one of those little problems that hind sight could have prevented before I got this far.  The bottom of the piston skirt contacted the crank throw before the rod seated on the crank at BDC - I had tried the rod on the crank before I installed the piston to make sure it turned on the crank ok but after installing the piston I did not check to make sure the flat bottom piston skirt would clear the crank throws at bottom dead centre - oops.  At this point I emailed Bolens 1000 and asked if he had ever encountered this with the newer style flat bottom piston and he said he had not and asked me to measure the piston height to verify that it was the same as the one he had in stock.  I removed the piston and did some measurements and compared both the old and new piston and rod to each other as there was a remote possibilty that the ID plate on the engine was not original and that while I was confident the engine was a TRA10D rather than a TR10D or some parts combination of both I wanted to reverify my work as one never knows what has happened to an engine that is fifty years old.  I sent the sizes to Brian and he double checked with another piston and they were identical and he is going to check with his Wisconsin rep and see what they say.  In the meantime I took pictures of the casting numbers and made up a cardboard template to measure the distance from the bottom of the wrist pin to the bottom where the rod cap bolts on and confirmed that they are identical in length.  I also checked the numbers cast into the old and new rods, pistons and the crankshaft number and am still convinced that the engine is a TRA10D.  I am wondering if anyone else has ever encountered this problem and if so how did you correct it?  

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Rod Aligned WIth Crank.jpg
  • 2 Piston Skirt Hit On Crank Throw.jpg
  • 3 Part Number On Box.jpg
  • 4 Part Number In Parts Manual.jpg
  • 5 Distance From Wrist Pin To Connecting Rod Join On Old Rod.jpg
  • 6 Distance From Wrist Pin To Connecting Rod Join On New Rod.jpg
  • 7 Number Cast On Inside Of Old Piston.jpg
  • 8 Number Cast On Inside of New Piston.jpg
  • 9 Number On Old Rod.jpg
  • 10 Number On New Rod.jpg
  • 11 Pistons Side By Side.jpg
  • 12 Old Piston In Front Of New Piston.jpg
  • 13 Height Of New Piston.jpg
  • 14 Numbers On Crank.jpg
  • 15 Stamping Number On Crank.jpg

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#365 heliosuk OFFLINE  

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Posted May 24, 2017 - 04:39 PM

I can't see it will make much difference as the throw of the crank will be the same. The rod length will determine the piston protrusion and hence the compression ratio especially if the head or top of the block has been skimmed. However this might have been taken care of with the oversize piston so provided the distance between the top ring and the top of the piston is the same it shouldn't affect anything.
If the head and or block has been skimmed then potentially this can lead to pre detonation(pinking)which is usually overcome by fitting a slightly thicker head gasket but I can't really see this on a low speed petrol engine. Again is easy to overcome by adjusting the timing.
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#366 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted May 24, 2017 - 05:00 PM

I can't see it will make much difference as the throw of the crank will be the same. The rod length will determine the piston protrusion and hence the compression ratio especially if the head or top of the block has been skimmed. However this might have been taken care of with the oversize piston so provided the distance between the top ring and the top of the piston is the same it shouldn't affect anything.
If the head and or block has been skimmed then potentially this can lead to pre detonation(pinking)which is usually overcome by fitting a slightly thicker head gasket but I can't really see this on a low speed petrol engine. Again is easy to overcome by adjusting the timing.

The problem is that because the new piston does not have the bottom sides of the skirt curved like the original piston does I cannot assemble the rod onto the crank because the piston skirt contacts the crankshaft throw before the connecting rod can seat on the crankshaft journal.  One option I am considering is sanding the bottom of the new piston to remove the skirt material to create the curved profile so it will clear the throws on the crankshaft.


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#367 KennyP OFFLINE  

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Posted May 24, 2017 - 05:22 PM

Something is not right with that piston, the skirts shouldn't touch the crank. If everything else about the piston is correct, then your only option is to make clearance in the skirt area.


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#368 Mark 149 J. OFFLINE  

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Posted May 24, 2017 - 07:44 PM

Something is not right with that piston, the skirts shouldn't touch the crank. If everything else about the piston is correct, then your only option is to make clearance in the skirt area.

I would agree with Kenny.


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#369 BRIAN EK7&10 OFFLINE  

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Posted May 24, 2017 - 09:58 PM

the DB 210 piston is for the S8D and the TR 10D you need a DB 210-1 for the TRA 10D.


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#370 BRIAN EK7&10 OFFLINE  

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Posted May 24, 2017 - 11:00 PM

I think that this was how Wisconsin changed the TR-10D to the TRA-10D. they machined the bottom of the DB-230 piston and put the CA 84 crankshaft into the same block as the S8D. the S8D and the TR-10D  are the same engine same bore and stroke same cid. the TRA-10-D and the TRA-12-D have the same crank with the same stroke and the TRA-12 -D pistons DB-234 have the same machined curve cut into the bottom of the piston. it seems that at some point in the many transitions of the Wisconsin name it was forgotten that the DB-230 piston also needed to be made into the DB-230-1, as I saw that the box that your new piston is labeled as a DB-230-1SP10. I have a DB-230-1SP30 that is new but has not been in a box and has some dings in it,and a DB-230-1 that is new in a box and in perfect condition. maybe Brian can talk with his contacts at Wisconsin and find out if the machined DB-230-1 is still available.


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#371 Bruce Dorsi OFFLINE  

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Posted May 25, 2017 - 08:44 AM

 One option I am considering is sanding the bottom of the new piston to remove the skirt material to create the curved profile so it will clear the throws on the crankshaft.

 

It appears either your new piston escaped machining, or the wrong piston was put in the box.

 

If you don't want the hassle of exchanging pistons (assuming there is a correct one available), I'd agree on re-shaping the piston you have.

 

Your old piston is a good guide on the amount of relief needed. 

 

I know you have the skills & knowledge to successfully modify the piston.


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#372 Bolens 1000 OFFLINE  

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Posted May 25, 2017 - 08:56 AM

It appears either your new piston escaped machining, or the wrong piston was put in the box.

 

If you don't want the hassle of exchanging pistons (assuming there is a correct one available), I'd agree on re-shaping the piston you have.

 

Your old piston is a good guide on the amount of relief needed. 

 

I know you have the skills & knowledge to successfully modify the piston.

 

Bruce, originally I  thought it could be the wrong piston but I have gotten several others just like this one from the factory, I looked on the web and there are pistons that are different oversize that are the same way, could later models have been changed over?? I could not find any part number changes.

 

The pistons I stock are right from Wisconsin so I would say chances of being misplaced in the wrong box are slim compared to finding NOS boxes which moved around shelf to shelf over the years.


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#373 Bruce Dorsi OFFLINE  

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Posted May 25, 2017 - 09:07 AM

Bruce, originally I  thought it could be the wrong piston but I have gotten several others just like this one from the factory, I looked on the web and there are pistons that are different oversize that are the same way, could later models have been changed over?? I could not find any part number changes.

 

The pistons I stock are right from Wisconsin so I would say chances of being misplaced in the wrong box are slim compared to finding NOS boxes which moved around shelf to shelf over the years.

 

I don't blame you, Brian.

 

In the past, we would occasionally receive new parts (from various brands) that were put in the wrong boxes or mislabeled.


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#374 BRIAN EK7&10 OFFLINE  

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Posted May 25, 2017 - 03:07 PM

I have 13 New in box DB230 pistons only one of them has the skit machined. I also have 10 TRA12D
DB234 pistons new in box all of them have the skirt machined with the round cut out

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  • IMG_1282.JPG
  • IMG_1281.JPG

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#375 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted May 25, 2017 - 04:05 PM

I decided to clean up the rear cover while I debated on what to do about the piston - drove the seal out with a small punch after I suspended the cover on two short 2x4's.  Had a good look at the wear pattern on the rear bearing cup and it looked good so I am going to reuse it.  I was curious as to how high the oil level is compared to the crank bearings so I stuck the dip stick in and took a picture.  The dipper on the connecting rod must create quite a splash to provide lubrication to all the moving parts with the oil at the full mark.  I got the cover cleaned up and removed all the old RTV from the bolt holes and then I checked the governor arm shaft for movement.  It has a little bit of play but the seal did not appear to be leaking and the shaft turned freely so I lubricated the shaft with new oil which should work its way into the needle bearings the shaft turns on and will not replace the seal at this point. Then I gave the machined surfaces a coat of new oil and put the cover in a clear garbage bag which will keep it clean until l am ready for it.  I removed the new rings off the piston and moved on to the clearance problem. 

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Seal Removed From Rear Cover.jpg
  • 2 Cover On Two Pieces Of Wood And Drove Seal Out With Punch.jpg
  • 3 Wear Pattern On Rear Bearing Cup.jpg
  • 4 Oil Level When Full.jpg
  • 5 Gear Cover Cleaned Up.jpg
  • 6 Gear Cover Cleaned Up.jpg
  • 7 Rings Removed From Piston.jpg

Edited by 29 Chev, May 26, 2017 - 03:35 PM.

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