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Can we get some sheet metal how to?


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#16 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted June 10, 2011 - 05:15 AM

I personally hate sheet metal work, mainly the repair types on really rusted mower decks. I had a bunch of pinholes on the mower deck for my Massey MF12G and used my mig on the lowest setting and did the spot welding. Only problem was there were quite a few spots where it didn't even have a chance to arc and the wire would go straight through the thin rusted away steel. This was after sandblasting it.

#17 coldone OFFLINE  

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Posted June 10, 2011 - 06:37 AM

I personally hate sheet metal work, mainly the repair types on really rusted mower decks. I had a bunch of pinholes on the mower deck for my Massey MF12G and used my mig on the lowest setting and did the spot welding. Only problem was there were quite a few spots where it didn't even have a chance to arc and the wire would go straight through the thin rusted away steel. This was after sandblasting it.



So what do you do to fix that problem?

#18 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted June 10, 2011 - 08:24 AM

So what do you do to fix that problem?


I'm not a welder at all. But had a friend in the factory that could weld anything with his eyes closed! Ed was the kind of guy who could write his name on the bottom of a welding table with a mig welder without looking at it. I watched him weld a bunch of hangers for a crane one time and he would hold the tubing at an angle so the heat would draw it to 90 degrees by the time he got all the way around. When he had thin sheetmetal that would blow through easily, he would clamp a piece of brass to the bottom of the hole. Fill the hole and the the weld would not stick to the brass.

Edited by JD DANNELS, June 10, 2011 - 08:32 AM.

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#19 ncb OFFLINE  

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Posted July 04, 2011 - 03:22 AM

did some welding on my mf 14 about a month ago and used a piece of aluminum for the same purpose Worked well but the brass may be better due to the extra mass . Started the first couple of holes without backing it up and kept blowing right through just like you . Bottom of the foot deck looked like half a sea urchin , god bless that grinder . right footpad had 6 holes and maybe 12 deep pits that i filled , Left side was considerably worse . 3/4 inch holes and gaps completely missing right next to the frame . I Cut it out , no other choice . So i laid a piece of 1 inch angle iron against the frame from the topside of the footrest and used it as a guide to run the grinder with a thin edge cutting disk down the edge , It worked sweet , maybe a little wider a gap to fill than optimum but marking the cut lines and freehanding the grinder I would have had more runout and error to deal with IMO. removed rear body section to do the 2 90 degree final cuts to remove the piece ,put the body section back on the frame , C clamped the angle iron into place, snugged it all back onto the frame with the bolts to keep perfect alignment , Tack welded it up solid and removed from frame for final welding from the bottom .Ground the excess weld , kleened well with tumbler wax and grease remover...that learning curve told me tumbler or equivilent is mandatory when i do paint ,unless your going for that "fisheye look" on purpose . finished with a whole can of rattlecan rustproofing primer and 1 whole rattlecan of auto undercoating. it gave 2 decent coats from the one can . roll on bedliner may be more tough and resilient but this was on my shelf. And the result............ nearly perfect,way better than hoped or required ,Im happy as a clam.massey ferguson 008.jpg

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  • massey ferguson 005.jpg

Edited by rexknightly, July 04, 2011 - 03:29 AM.

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#20 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted July 04, 2011 - 03:36 AM

Rex, looks good. I have thought about using the undercoat at times, let us know how it works out.
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#21 caseguy OFFLINE  

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Posted July 04, 2011 - 07:46 AM

Looks to me like you did a god job Rex! I like the idea of the undercoating for a working tractor! Great job!
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#22 valley ranch OFFLINE  

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Posted August 11, 2011 - 06:28 PM

Greetings, Looking at the mower deck we have here, not knowing the size of the hole you are dealing with, I would weld the patch on from the bottom then you can fill from the top. The patch can be shaped with a hammer until it is close enough before welding. With an Angle Grinder, from the top, you can grind it smooth and add more by welding if there are pocks or low spots. You can work with gas or electric. If you are using gas you can shape the patch in place with the torch and hammer. You can fill with body plastic or glass resin, sand and paint if you want to. I owned a body shop for years, lately I've have enjoyed using a small wire feed, I don't get the stick welder out unless I have to. Good luck to you, have fun, you'll do it great.

#23 coldone OFFLINE  

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Posted August 13, 2011 - 10:53 PM

Well, i started this thread so that I could get some ideas on patching a wheelhorse deck, and then forgot about the thread. Opps. I have done just what Valley ranch stated. The thickest sheetmetal I could get easily was 16gauge. I cut a piece of card board and made a template. There were more than one angle that in the area so it wasnt just a simple bend. I transfered the template on to the sheet and then cut it out with a grinder. I got it positioned then used the ball peen hammer to get it set into the curves. I tacked it on with 3/32 6011 rod. I didnt try to get it on solid at the time, I just wanted the areas that fit well to not move while I banged it into place a little better. So It was tack a little, bang a little untill the pacth was making good contact all around. I then went and started tacking between the previous tack until i had a good solid patch in place. I did burn through the patch in a few areas but dressed them with the grinder and tacked again. All of this was done on the underside of the deck. It aint pretty but its held up and patched the hole. If I ever redo the deck I will fill in the rusted hole withe some type of filler and paint over it.

The adventure has increased my comfort level with this type of welding. I saw where i can improve and make the next one better. i wont be as intimidated next time. I will see if i can get some pics before long.

Thanks for all of the suggestions, everyone of them helped.

#24 valley ranch OFFLINE  

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Posted August 15, 2011 - 12:59 PM

Pictures are always fun to look at!

#25 Utah Smitty OFFLINE  

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Posted August 15, 2011 - 03:37 PM

Check out the metal working tools at Harbor Freight. I bought a sheet metal machine there--it will slit up to about 18 gauge steel, plus will put a bead on the end, or bend for a lap joint, etc. HF also has some inexpensive sheet metal brakes that may be handy.

Regards,

U S
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#26 coldone OFFLINE  

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Posted August 19, 2013 - 08:36 PM

I stumbled across this thread on another board. It has an amazing amount of info regarding sheet metal work. They have examples of complex multiple bends, radiusus, compound bends etc... Most all done with simple tools, a homemade break, vise grips, hammers, dollies, drifts, etc... Its 18 pages long and full of pics (dial up beware). I know its helped me and figured I would pass it along.

 

http://retrorides.pr...42606=undefined

 

 

I dont think there is a problem with this site but it has made my comp strain a few times with the amount of pics it has in the thread.


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#27 Utah Smitty OFFLINE  

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Posted August 24, 2013 - 10:21 AM

You're right, it is LONG, but has a lot of good information... thanks for sharing it.

 

Smitty



#28 Texas Deere and Horse OFFLINE  

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Posted August 24, 2013 - 12:44 PM

I stumbled across this thread on another board. It has an amazing amount of info regarding sheet metal work. They have examples of complex multiple bends, radiusus, compound bends etc... Most all done with simple tools, a homemade break, vise grips, hammers, dollies, drifts, etc... Its 18 pages long and full of pics (dial up beware). I know its helped me and figured I would pass it along.

 

http://retrorides.pr...42606=undefined

 

 

I dont think there is a problem with this site but it has made my comp strain a few times with the amount of pics it has in the thread.

 

 

Mine took a long time to load everything also, but cool info there.



#29 UncleWillie OFFLINE  

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Posted August 24, 2013 - 07:22 PM

I am better at tearing things up than at making them pretty.


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#30 twostep OFFLINE  

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Posted August 26, 2013 - 04:17 PM

I did small patch on my 44C deck and you can see it in post #20 and #22.

 

http://gardentractor...-rebuild/page-2

 

Not real fancy but it was smooth enough that you couldn't find the patch after paint. Make a cardbard/heavy construction paper template (the devider that comes in Busch Lite 30 packs works great), trace it out on sheet steel, and form it to fit. For anything under 12" long I have a break to bend with. I made a simple break to put in my little HF press. It is made from two pieces of 2x2x3/8 angle spaced about an inch or so apart. I've got a piece of round bar that I use as a die. The round bar is hardened, actually it's the shifter rod out of a transfer case. For things that won't fit in the press just clamp to a steel work table and bend by hand.






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