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Can we get some sheet metal how to?


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#1 coldone OFFLINE  

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Posted May 28, 2011 - 09:04 PM

The deck that came with the WH D160 is in rougher shape that what I am used to and my current skill level would only allow me to place patches over the rust areas. I would like to be able to make nice repairs that dosent look like a hack did it. I want them to blend in and be smooth. I would like to do it with the tools that I have, basic hand tools if possible. I can braze and I do have a small 100amp stick welder.

I have seen some beutiful work by the members here, I am sure that there are others that would like to be able to patch some of their sheet metal too.

Thanks

#2 olcowhand OFFLINE  

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Posted May 28, 2011 - 09:09 PM

Sheet metal work direction is a job for member jdcrawler. Ray is awesome at it!

#3 IamSherwood OFFLINE  

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Posted May 30, 2011 - 08:20 PM

It is definatly an art.
I've watch body shop guys work sheet metal, and it just amazed me how they can read the stresses, and make
it move, and look like new.
Patching it, without overheating, and deforming, is a good challenge. Ive done a bit with my crappy mig, and it was
a test of anger management.

#4 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted May 31, 2011 - 10:00 AM

I have a deck for the MF8 that I have ignored since I pulled the tractor apart. I knew it was rough but boy what a mess. The PO had a property with large pine and spruce trees and roots sticking up through the lawn. He must have torn the deck apart a number of times and patched it. Man it is rough--gobs of weld and patches on top and underneath. I'll have to post pictures to get an opinion if it is salvageable or not. I would also be interested in any posts or tutorials on rebuilding decks

#5 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted May 31, 2011 - 10:07 AM

Don't used bronze,and braze the patches in.In my opinion, bronze has no place in bodywork any more.Sure it was used a lot in days gone by,but it is just wrong to used it now.You would be better of to go buy a cheap MIG welding.That's just the way I see it.

#6 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted May 31, 2011 - 10:26 AM

Hi Maynard

It looks like the PO has brazed the patches on. There are lumps of weld sticking up at least 1/4". It's a real mess. I was going to take it apart to derust it in the electrolysis tank but had second thoughts. I don't need a deck. When the 8 restore is finished I may sell it. I'll never get my money back but it is a bit small to do any work around my place. It will probably be easier to sell with a deck. If I do all the prep work and then take the deck to my welder it may not be too expensive.

#7 Texas Deere and Horse OFFLINE  

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Posted May 31, 2011 - 10:30 AM

I like to flame weld with wire. You can buy it from most welding shops, but I usually use a good coat hanger or good fence wire. Work in small areas to keep the warpage from heat down. You can also use a little heat and body hammers to shape metal how you want it. I only know 1 way to do those kind of jobs, JUMP IN WITH BOTH FEET AND DO IT.....trial and error is how most all of us learned what we know....Good Luck...
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#8 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted May 31, 2011 - 12:51 PM

Yes,"flame" welding with steel rods is a good way,I have done a pile of that in the past. ( pre MIG )

#9 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted May 31, 2011 - 04:03 PM

I don't weld...yet! It is on my list of skills to learn but I probably won't get to it until I retire. The welder where I work lives nearby and has a shop by his house so I usually do all the prep work and jig things up for him and he welds them for me for beer money. That works well for both of us. He has a couple of mig welders and the clean weld that he gets with mig is a lot prettier than some of the flux core arc welding I have had done by others in the past. As soon as the 314 is back together I'm going at the MF8 restore. I want it finished by the fall. I'm down to doing the red stuff. The chassis and the grey bits are finished. I'll be going at the deck first thing to see if it's salvageable.

#10 coldone OFFLINE  

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Posted May 31, 2011 - 07:44 PM

How about bending radiuses? Most of the bends in the decks are not 90deg. They have a radius to them. On one area of my deck that needs patching, I am thinking that I need to use the deck as the form and "rough" bend the patch on the deck to get the correct radius. Then tack the top and use what ever means to get the patch in the hole to finish tacking it.

#11 caseguy OFFLINE  

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Posted May 31, 2011 - 08:46 PM

How about bending radiuses? Most of the bends in the decks are not 90deg. They have a radius to them. On one area of my deck that needs patching, I am thinking that I need to use the deck as the form and "rough" bend the patch on the deck to get the correct radius. Then tack the top and use what ever means to get the patch in the hole to finish tacking it.


Harbor freight sells a set of body hammers and dollies that you can use to form metal panels. click here I haven't gotten a set yet, but I plan on it.I have used my ball-peen and an anvil with some success, and have also made my own dollies out of chunks of 1" plate and a grinder. At the price of this set, you could practice until you get the hang of it.
I'd like to see some how-to stuff written up as well with lots of pictures. I usually screw up a piece or two before I'm happy with the outcome.
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#12 Texas Deere and Horse OFFLINE  

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Posted May 31, 2011 - 09:19 PM

How about bending radiuses? Most of the bends in the decks are not 90deg. They have a radius to them. On one area of my deck that needs patching, I am thinking that I need to use the deck as the form and "rough" bend the patch on the deck to get the correct radius. Then tack the top and use what ever means to get the patch in the hole to finish tacking it.


Some of the older body men use a stool that has a thick pad on it. The pad is made of leather and is full of sand, it's about 4" thick and about 12" in diameter. The pad is not completely full, so if you want to beat a flat piece into a bowl, the sand will move around as you beat on it to make a depression in the middle. I want to make one of these just for doing repair pieces like used on deck repairs.
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#13 KennyP OFFLINE  

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Posted June 02, 2011 - 06:09 AM

A mig can be used with small wire and low heat. But you need to do 'spot welds' in different areas to keep from warping. Most mower deck metal is a lot thicker than car bodies. Shouldn't be too awful hard.

#14 Encrypt OFFLINE  

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Posted June 09, 2011 - 04:59 PM

For bending the radius you can use a break also. But when you use a hammer and bag it will beat the hell out of it. You'll get almost any radius doing that! LoL. However once that is done you'll need to get the metal hot with a torch. Just heat it up it'll turn black then quinch it in water to harden it. Also what you'll need after the bag and hammer is a English wheel to "stretch" the metal out and smooth it out.

#15 caseguy OFFLINE  

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Posted June 09, 2011 - 09:09 PM

Here is a link to a company that I used to receive catalogs from (before I could afford anything they sold LOL). I just signed up to get a new "free" catalog online. As I remember, they were the GO-TO source for auto body tools and supplies years ago. Click Here
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