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#1 js5020 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 13, 2016 - 09:52 AM

I don't see a specific forum for this so I'll ask here.  I've been getting more and more invested into a new hobby (atv riding) and now need to graduate into a real rig to haul quads to and from these parks, some are a few miles from home and some are a few states away.  My plan is to purchase an enclosed trailer to haul the machines and use the trailer to double as make shift sleeping quarters for extended stays.

 

I'm a bit unfamiliar with the ins and outs of just how much trailer I can legally/safely tow with my truck.  I'd like to go with a 7' or 8'  wide and 18' or 20' long enclosed with a rating of 7000lb.  I'll be towing with a 1500 series GMC and the door sticker has a GVWR of 6400lb does this mean I can legally/safely pull a load of that weight (trailer and cargo)?  There is another sticker that states I shouldn't load the truck (riders and cargo) with more than 1250lb, does this apply even with the loaded trailer hooked up also?  I found another sticker on the trailer hitch (came with the truck new and is prewired for a brake controller) that says 5000lb and with a distribution hitch 12000lb.  Without running the rig across a scale I would estimate not being over 5500lb with the trailer (trailer and cargo).  

 

I know I will need to install a brake controller but for those experienced what else might I need to safely/legally travel with a rig like this?


Edited by js5020, October 13, 2016 - 09:52 AM.


#2 Bud W OFFLINE  

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Posted October 13, 2016 - 10:52 AM

I towed an older 20' enclosed trailer with 2-4 wheelers with my 97 Chevy Tahoe, No problems. You will need an appropriate weight distribution hitch with appropriate load bars and should have an anti-sway bar.


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#3 stiemmy ONLINE  

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Posted October 13, 2016 - 11:08 AM

I would think towing specifics would be online to tell you exact towing capacity, or maybe call your nearest camper dealer. They will know for sure.

Just to give you an idea, I have an 06 Yukon Denali w/ tow package, 6.0 V8 and its rated at 7900 towing. This looks the same as a tahoe. I pull a 09 Dutchmen 25' travel trailer with a slide, it is rated at 7500 GVWR. I have the head, and bars for towing, and it pulls very well.
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#4 shorty ONLINE  

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Posted October 13, 2016 - 12:30 PM

Check out a snowmobile trailer. A little lighter build and easier to pull. And a 102" will give better side by side room.
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#5 Bill 76 ONLINE  

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Posted October 13, 2016 - 01:32 PM

GVWR is the maximum weight of truck with passengers - fuel & cargo INCLUDING trailer tongue weight. As others have said you will need a weight distribution hitch.

In Wisconsin you  need plates on the trailer if it weights over 3000 lbs . It does vary from state to state

I have a GMC 1500 4x4 and it weights 5940 lbs empty.  


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#6 MiCarl OFFLINE  

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Posted October 13, 2016 - 01:57 PM

You will need to locate the towing capacity of the truck.  It will depend on regular cap/extended cab/crew cab, 4x2 or 4x4, suspension and powertrain options.  It should be in the owner's manual.


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#7 Bill 76 ONLINE  

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Posted October 13, 2016 - 02:14 PM

You will need to locate the towing capacity of the truck.  It will depend on regular cap/extended cab/crew cab, 4x2 or 4x4, suspension and powertrain options.  It should be in the owner's manual.

Good point MiCarl  May also want to check RPO codes usually located in the glove box on options built into truck--These can be looked up on the internet. 


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#8 js5020 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 13, 2016 - 03:09 PM

Thanks for the tips guys, I got out the manual and while doing so I saw a tag in the glovebox that states the manufacturer recommends not to use a slide in camper with the truck.  The manual states for my body style and gear ratio 6700lb max trailer weight and 12000lb GCWR and a max tongue weight of 600lb.  As said earlier another sticker on the door states not to place more than 1250lb in the truck.

 

So lets see if I get this,,,,,, if I have 2 passengers weighing 200lb a piece, I can still put 850lb in the truck?  If I have 2 200lb passengers and 26 gal of gas I loose another 150-200lb? or down to 650lb left to put in the truck?  If I have 2 passengers, 26 gal of gas and a trailer tongue weight of 400lb I can only put approx. 250lb of cargo in the truck without exceeding GVWR of the truck?

 

The trailer cannot exceed the max weight of 6700 (recommended towing capacity) to include the weight of the trailer and the cargo.  The weight of the loaded truck and loaded trailer cannot exceed the GCWR of 12000lb?

 

Finally as long as the trailer weight doesn't exceed 5000lb I don't need a load distributing hitch?

 

Or am I still lost?



#9 pick-to-stone OFFLINE  

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Posted October 13, 2016 - 04:32 PM

Hi when you get a trailer get a car trailer you can fit four maybe 5 on one trailer
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#10 MiCarl OFFLINE  

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Posted October 13, 2016 - 05:50 PM

 

Finally as long as the trailer weight doesn't exceed 5000lb I don't need a load distributing hitch?

 

 

You might still need/want a weight distributing hitch.  Just because the receiver can handle the load doesn't mean it's a good idea.

 

With a regular hitch a properly loaded 5000lb. trailer will put about 500 lbs. on the hitch.  That weight will make the rear end sag and the front lift.  The truck might handle quite poorly.  Remember, when you load the bed most of the weight is over the axle - not 4 feet behind it.

 

A weight distributing hitch transfers some of the tongue weight to the front wheels, making handling quite a bit better.

 

I used to pull a 5000lb. travel trailer with a 4x4 GMC Yukon that was rated for about 7500lbs.  Occasionally I'd need to maneuver the trailer in a tight spot so I'd do it without the spring bars (the weight distributing part) because they can bind up if you turn extremely tight.  The hitch would barely clear the ground and I had to sit up tall to see over the edge of the hood.  I'm sure it'd been nearly impossible to drive down the road like that.


Edited by MiCarl, October 13, 2016 - 05:54 PM.

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#11 Mtypython OFFLINE  

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Posted October 13, 2016 - 07:17 PM

i used to pull a 18 single axle with 4 dirt bike and gear with a 97 expedition and a bobcat on a trailer with a 1500 no problem


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#12 js5020 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 13, 2016 - 07:44 PM

I appreciate everyones help, last thing I want to do is go to a dealer with limited knowledge,, god only knows when they will stop telling me I need stuff I don't really need.

 

I am currently hauling one quad in the truck box and the other quad on a buddys trailer.  I have no clue what his trailer weighs, one quad is about 600lb and that one goes in the bed of the truck and the other goes 850 and its on the trailer. Trailer doesn't have brakes, single axle and the truck feels pretty normal except for less acceleration on hills and need to apply a bit more brake.



#13 nitro OFFLINE  

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Posted October 13, 2016 - 08:34 PM

Go here:  https://gmheritagece...ation-kits.html

If you scroll down through you will find MAximum Trailer Capacity.  I don't know your model year but guessed at a '99 c/k1500.  It shows a max trailer of 7500 for 2x4 and 7000 for 4x4 with a 350.  Your GVWR comes into play, it must include truck weight, passengers, gear, fuel, and trailer tongue weight (roughly 15% of trailer weight IF loaded correctly).  7000# trailer times 15% is 1050#, plus all the other. 

 

I tow a 7700# travel trailer with a '97 k2500 454 suburban and a wife and three kids, and I wouldn't want a smaller rig, or a much bigger trailer.  It's max trailer weight is 10,000#.  A weight dist anti-sway hitch is a must.

 

Attached File  1999-Chevrolet-Truck.pdf   15.45MB   6 downloadsAttached File  1999-Chevrolet-Truck engines.pdf   15.45MB   7 downloads


Edited by nitro, October 13, 2016 - 08:43 PM.

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#14 js5020 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 13, 2016 - 10:56 PM

Thanks, the truck is an 06 1500 extended cab, 6 1/2 box, 4x4 with the 4.8L auto.  Honestly this is all confusing and makes little sense.  I am currently hauling one quad weighing 600lb in the bed and one quad weighing 850lb on a well constructed (heavy) trailer with no brakes, single axle and we have zero issues as far as handling go, the truck isn't working hard, swaying, or anything .  Now I want to go enclosed with a tandem axle and brakes on the trailer and I might not have a big enough truck?  Yes very confused.



#15 nitro OFFLINE  

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Posted October 14, 2016 - 12:06 AM

If you don't load it real heavy you might be okay, it's all about weight.  an 800 pound quad on a 3000# gross trailer weighs maybe 1600-1800 pounds.  A tandem axle box trailer might weigh near that itself, and then load two quads and other gear and you're at 4000# before you know it, that's a lot more.  It adds up quick.  I would rent a similar trailer to see how it pulls before you drop the cash on a trailer.  It may be ok depending on how much you are hauling but it can get hairy when you get heavy.  Remember it's not just starting and stopping, the trailer will also tend to want to go straight when you want to change direction. 

 

My biggest lesson in towing, I had a 1966 F100 with a healthy 390 four speed.  I borrowed a car trailer from a friend and hauled a 3/4 ton 70's Chevy plow truck.  Problem was I loaded it half ass like the light stock cars I was used to towing.  I ended up experiencing wicked tail wag that took two trailer tires off the rims, bent the trailer tongue, my bumper and quarter panel, and put all three in the ditch.  It's worth the caution and a little math.  I could have killed someone.


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