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Mowing on hills question.


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#1 TimW OFFLINE  

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Posted September 22, 2016 - 08:15 PM

I have quite a few garden tractors, mostly vintage stuff that I like tinkering with, but I am really not that familiar with mowing on steeper grades.  I am now in a position where I may have to mow some pretty steep slopes.  Does wheel weights help greatly in climbing steeper dry grades, or are you better off not trying to pull the additional weight?  Do they add stability on sideways mowing?  Does an extended vertical climb, say 200ft, starve the single cylinder kohlers without pressurization of oil enough to cause and issue?  I also have a Deutz Allis 1920 that I may be using, so I assume the Kohler 20 Magnum would keep itself adequately lubricate at about any reasonable angle.  I have some fairly nice Bolens gear driven tube frames, does anybody have thoughts on them for slow, hillside mowing?   Thanks    Tim 


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#2 dropped82 ONLINE  

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Posted September 22, 2016 - 08:19 PM

I would think the duetz would be the best machine. It's large and heavy. Plus with dual brakes and diff lock, not much stopping it. The twin Kohler has pressure oiling so that's not an issue. I would run wheel weights also. The extra weight will keep you planted. Ever thought about running duals? That wouldn't hurt either as long as you increase the weight to compensate for the extra tire area

Eric

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Edited by dropped82, September 22, 2016 - 08:19 PM.

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#3 Eric OFFLINE  

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Posted September 22, 2016 - 09:12 PM

Just a word of advice, do not mow horizontally across a steep grade. Riding mowers are prone to rollovers on steep grades, just use good judgment. They make slope mowers for a reason, I have seen many a tractor on its side. I believe gravely made a really cool slope mower that tilted on its wheels like a sport bike in a turn, it looked very futuristic.
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#4 tractorskipper OFFLINE  

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Posted September 22, 2016 - 09:27 PM

I never mow up steep slopes anymore, always down, & find another way back up.

 

I have twice in my long life survived end for end roll-overs. when the front end came up mowing up hill, not a nice experience & I'm very lucky.  There were many years between the two incidents, so I obviously got complacent.

 

Good luck & always think, because none of the machines you mentioned would feel good on top of you!

 

Skip


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#5 Talntedmrgreen OFFLINE  

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Posted September 22, 2016 - 09:35 PM

For my slopes on my lawn, I added 3" spacers to widen my stance, yet keep within the 48" cut path, went to AG tires in the back and 5-ribs up front to reduce slipping, and found 2-42lb suitcase weights out front help keep my nose down. I run about 50lbs per rear wheel. All my problems were solvedm.

I thik it takes some trial and error to find what works best for your terrain and machine.
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#6 JBRamsey OFFLINE  

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Posted September 22, 2016 - 09:39 PM

For my slopes on my lawn, I added 3" spacers to widen my stance, yet keep within the 48" cut path, went to AG tires in the back and 5-ribs up front to reduce slipping, and found 2-42lb suitcase weights out front help keep my nose down. I run about 50lbs per rear wheel. All my problems were solvedm.
I thik it takes some trial and error to find what works best for your terrain and machine.


Unfortunately, the error part of that can have permanent consequences for the survivors.
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#7 Cvans ONLINE  

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Posted September 22, 2016 - 10:29 PM

If the engine in your 1920 has an oil filter it should be a full pressure engine and be fine on a hill. If it does not have a filter I wouldn't do it. 

The 1920 should have a differential lock and that will help with traction. It has been my experience that rear wheel weights have helped with stability on the hills. The 1920 I had came with a loader and not a mower deck so I can't speak for mowing with it. 

Go slow and be safe. 


Edited by Cvans, September 25, 2016 - 08:01 PM.


#8 shorty ONLINE  

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Posted September 23, 2016 - 05:05 AM

Steep hills mean different to different people. Like said above, wheel width makes a big difference. I run weights and will push the pucker factor a bit. If i can climb a hill without spinning, I can safely run side ways if I wish to. I would try it and when it feels you are pushing it too far, back out of it. And add weights, widen the tire stance until you are comfortable. When I did the neighbor's weed patch he calls a yard this year, I had to add all my snow plowing weights to get through it.
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#9 backwoods OFFLINE  

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Posted September 23, 2016 - 06:28 AM

One thing I try to do when mowing slopes is use a gt or lt with a low center of gravity wide tires an weights.
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#10 chieffan ONLINE  

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Posted September 23, 2016 - 07:42 AM

I mow the one long narrow bank with my JD F525 front off set deck.  It has a very low center of gravity, about 5" max clearance under it.  Wheel weights on all 3 .  If you have problems keeping your butt in the seat it is probably to steep.


Edited by chieffan, September 23, 2016 - 04:24 PM.

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#11 Arjay OFFLINE  

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Posted September 25, 2016 - 07:35 PM

I have a older 212 Deere with loaded 23-10.50x12 Goodyear ag tires I actually put knobby go kart type tires on the front to so I could steer uphill on some of my steep slopes, but that machine was like a Billy goat I personally always mowed cross ways on the steep slopes put your weight on the top side and go... but with all your questions and concerns in my option if your worried about it you should be asking yourself is it worth damaging a mower or getting hurt? You can buy a heck of a weed eater or a push mower $300.00 can you replace your tractor for that? If your not comfortable just don't do it
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