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Corn Silage is coming off in Wisconsin


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#1 ducky OFFLINE  

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Posted September 15, 2016 - 09:36 PM

Though some of you would like this.  I operate equipment for a few farmer up here now we are at corn silage.  This is the 1200 cow diary and next week we get into really big iron at a 3500 head operation.  I'll post picks of that too.

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#2 Cvans ONLINE  

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Posted September 15, 2016 - 11:23 PM

Same here. Been going on for over a week now. Those big ugly green Claas silage cutters are everywhere. From what I understand one of those can keep three semi's busy hauling. It's amazing how fast a couple of those can eat up a corn field. 


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#3 camdigger OFFLINE  

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Posted September 15, 2016 - 11:24 PM

The outfit our daughter works for finished their silage two weeks ago. We helped them cover the pit a week ago Saturday. All cereal grain and grass. I think I recall they put 300 loads in the pit. They are putting up the last 100 acres of hay this week.

Only a month before their cows come home off pasture and the daily feeding begins.
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#4 shorty ONLINE  

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Posted September 16, 2016 - 04:27 AM

Around here they are just starting too. It seems a week or two later than normal. I always thought it would be fun to work with a crew for a week. More than that, I don't know if I could handle the hours.

#5 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted September 16, 2016 - 05:01 AM

Thanks Don! You folks do it different than what we did down in SW Kansas. We just ground the shelled corn and packed that into bunkers.



#6 chieffan ONLINE  

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Posted September 16, 2016 - 07:12 AM

Been done here for a couple weeks also.  Don't cover the stacks here.  Pits are usually made with large round bale stacked 2 high.  Hay is ground and mixed with the silage for feeding.


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#7 LilysDad ONLINE  

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Posted September 16, 2016 - 09:55 AM

When I was a kid they still used the vertical silos. The other kids told me that the air in the shed attached to the silo was toxic and the juice bubbling off the silo was poisonous. True or false?



#8 jimmy G ONLINE  

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Posted September 16, 2016 - 10:00 AM

When I was a kid they still used the vertical silos. The other kids told me that the air in the shed attached to the silo was toxic and the juice bubbling off the silo was poisonous. True or false?

methane is a killer on farm's
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#9 Cvans ONLINE  

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Posted September 16, 2016 - 12:01 PM

Like mentioned watch out for the methane. I have a hard time believing any part of the silage would be poison. Never heard that before and why would you feed something that's poisonous to your cattle. 

If the silage had spoiled the would be something totally different. Wish someone would enlighten on this subject.


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#10 adamjd200 OFFLINE  

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Posted September 16, 2016 - 12:10 PM

Going to start chopping this weekend, in PA we had an upright silo, the gas is a big safety hazard, when we had to enter the silo while filling we would leave the blower running with the tractor just above idle for ventilation, not 100% on the juice though, here we just make a pile, pack it, an cover with plastic and seal the edges with dirt.  Only a few farms locally have big equipment like that, pull type New Holland's are still  very common, we have a 770 with a two row head for corn and a super717 for hay.


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#11 shorty ONLINE  

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Posted September 16, 2016 - 12:32 PM

When I was a kid they still used the vertical silos. The other kids told me that the air in the shed attached to the silo was toxic and the juice bubbling off the silo was poisonous. True or false?

About 20 years ago, my uncle that I was helping that year was overcome by gas. Found him when he didn't go in for lunch. Fortunately he survived but has lung damage which limits him some.
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#12 jms180 ONLINE  

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Posted September 16, 2016 - 01:39 PM

 Thanks for the pictures I enjoyed looking at the farm operations.Farmers around here are picking corn and they will come back and plant wheat. Next spring when the wheat is combined they will plant soy beans. Years ago cotton was king now ethanol is king. 


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#13 Sawdust OFFLINE  

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Posted September 16, 2016 - 05:10 PM

As one of my favorite persons this year would say " that's Huuuge" A lot of nice pics. I enjoy watching these big rigs work....amazing. We have mostly tobacco & soy bean farmers here. Either way I support our American Farmers.
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#14 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted September 16, 2016 - 05:22 PM

Silage time is mostly over here.  Farmers are full swing into running beans & shelling corn now.  Thanks for the pics Don.  All much larger scale than anything near me.


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#15 ducky OFFLINE  

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Posted September 16, 2016 - 07:10 PM

Like mentioned watch out for the methane. I have a hard time believing any part of the silage would be poison. Never heard that before and why would you feed something that's poisonous to your cattle.
If the silage had spoiled the would be something totally different. Wish someone would enlighten on this subject.


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