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Sovereign 18 bypass issue, I think?


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#31 tddeangelo OFFLINE  

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Posted September 20, 2016 - 09:30 AM

Got the call. Dropped it off Saturday, they just called to say it's all finished. Sweet. 

 

Hope to get it today or tomorrow. Give it a test run in the next couple days as a mower.....



#32 tddeangelo OFFLINE  

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Posted September 20, 2016 - 07:59 PM

Got the tractor, all is good as far as I know. Mowed a little to just try it out. I have to learn the thing, but holy crap does it cut like a beast. Hit some tall grass overdue to be mowed that would have left a ragged cut with my Husky if I tried to cut it very short. The Simplicity just carved through it like butter and left a nice clean cut. 

 

It's a little weird having a left-side discharge, but I can get used to it. 

 

Now to get into the manual and learn a bit more about it, now that I can run it. 


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#33 SimplyRad OFFLINE  

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Posted September 21, 2016 - 10:49 AM

You will get used to the left side discharge. I had to get used to right side as all of my earlier Simplicitys had the left side and now have 2 of them. I mostly mow high grass and weed with mine around my hunting blinds now.



#34 tddeangelo OFFLINE  

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Posted September 23, 2016 - 01:25 PM

Dumb question, but don't see it in the manuals---

 

How do I adjust the cutting height on the deck?

 

It's REAL short right now, and while the tractor appears to have the guts to cut down that low even with higher grass, it leaves a mess then of grass clippings, and I'd really prefer not to cut so low. 

 

It seems with the hydraulic deck lift, it's either up or down, no in between, and the roller bar in the back apparently is what determine the cut height, but I haven't yet found where to fiddle with that to get it to the desired setting. There's a spring-loaded pin on the left side of the deck, but it won't budge readily. Haven't dug into it too far to see if that's proper or if something's amiss with it. 

 

Also seems to have a slower top speed forward than rearward, which is odd. Slows noticeably if I go up a slope, but I notice it when I'm turning on a slope, where the higher rear wheel would get light and possibly spin....almost seems to limiting slip...? Do these tractors do that?

 

I have to slap on the wheel weights I got with it and see if that makes a difference. 

 

I'm guessing I should get some chains for it if I want to push snow in the winter. I'm curious--- my driveway is about a 15% grade (not 15 degrees, 15%). I've assumed I'll need to push down and drive up without pushing snow, then push down again. Now I'm wondering if I'll have any traction issues with it on a snowy driveway? Going downhill shouldn't mean traction issues to make it go, I'm more thinking traction to make it STOP. And wondering how badly the chains will chew on my asphalt driveway....lots to learn....



#35 Cat385B ONLINE  

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Posted September 23, 2016 - 02:11 PM

The striping rollers set the cut height.

It is possible yours has limited slip differential.

Get chains with rubber cross ties. Work good from what I've read. That, and lots of weight.

#36 SimplyRad OFFLINE  

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Posted September 23, 2016 - 03:27 PM

There is an adjusting screw on each side of the mower.right in front of the rollers. The screw in to raise the and unscrew to lower. On one of my decks the bolts are tight so the hight doesn't change on its own. The screw just rod with a bent T handle.



#37 tddeangelo OFFLINE  

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Posted September 23, 2016 - 09:26 PM

The striping rollers set the cut height.

It is possible yours has limited slip differential.

Get chains with rubber cross ties. Work good from what I've read. That, and lots of weight.

I was wondering if it was a limited slip differential. Didn't know they put those in these tractors.

I have two 60-lb rear wheel weights. I've seen YouTube vids where they have a rack on the rear hitch with more weight. Is that a homemade deal or something that can be purchased?

Edited by tddeangelo, September 23, 2016 - 09:26 PM.


#38 Cat385B ONLINE  

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Posted September 23, 2016 - 11:37 PM

Both. Simplicity sold a rear box. You could also build one from metal or wood, and fill it with sand or concrete.
image.gif

Here's a pic of chains with rubber cross bars:
image.png

As far as weight goes, the single most effective weight for rear traction is filling the rear tires with fluid. Your tractor has 23x10.5x12 rear tires? That holds 7-7.5 gallons per tire, giving you 55 up to 80 pounds per tire of weight depending on what you 'load' them with. Options include beet juice, RV antifreeze, or windshield washer fluid.
I say the most effective because it only is pushing down on your tire. That's it. Not on the axle, the rear hitch, or anywhere else. The only spot that fluid is pushing down on is where your tire is contacting the asphalt. The drawback to loaded tires is if you have a lawn that gets soft when wet. Mowing with loaded tires in a soft yard can possibly leave tracks, depending on your soil.
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#39 Alc OFFLINE  

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Posted September 24, 2016 - 07:08 AM

Those rubber tire chains might be the right thing for driveways like my neighbors , I used to plow it with my tractor with regular steel chains . Everywhere the tires spun there are marks left behind because he has his seal coated

#40 SimplyRad OFFLINE  

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Posted September 24, 2016 - 11:50 AM

Both. Simplicity sold a rear box. You could also build one from metal or wood, and fill it with sand or concrete.
attachicon.gifimage.gif

Here's a pic of chains with rubber cross bars:
attachicon.gifimage.png

As far as weight goes, the single most effective weight for rear traction is filling the rear tires with fluid. Your tractor has 23x10.5x12 rear tires? That holds 7-7.5 gallons per tire, giving you 55 up to 80 pounds per tire of weight depending on what you 'load' them with. Options include beet juice, RV antifreeze, or windshield washer fluid.
I say the most effective because it only is pushing down on your tire. That's it. Not on the axle, the rear hitch, or anywhere else. The only spot that fluid is pushing down on is where your tire is contacting the asphalt. The drawback to loaded tires is if you have a lawn that gets soft when wet. Mowing with loaded tires in a soft yard can possibly leave tracks, depending on your soil.

How do you that much in a tire? I only got 6 gal in my tires. Do have a means of putting it in without breaking the bead?



#41 Cat385B ONLINE  

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Posted September 24, 2016 - 12:07 PM

How do you that much in a tire? I only got 6 gal in my tires. Do have a means of putting it in without breaking the bead?

Rim Guard's chart says 6.8 gallons for a 23x10.5x12 officially. I never had an issue with 7 gallons in my JD 212 or the 7.5 gallons I put in my Homelite T15.

I used the hose adapter from TSC to do it. They are located by the Slime products.
image.jpeg
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#42 SimplyRad OFFLINE  

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Posted September 24, 2016 - 12:29 PM

I will have to look into that.



#43 tddeangelo OFFLINE  

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Posted September 26, 2016 - 07:42 AM

I spent a few minutes trying to put the wheel weights on, but dang, you gotta be gumby to get your hand in there behind the wheel to bolt those things on. I didn't have a lot of time to mess with it, and I just grabbed two adjustable wrenches as they were close at hand. Clearly, I need to use sockets for this job, so I just bailed on it for now. 

 

So I understand the valve for pumping fluid into the tires....but two questions:

 

-How do you pressurize the fluid to get it in the tire? I'm clearly not going to just slap my garden hose on the tire and pump well water into the thing.What do you use to pump it in?

 

-I don't have any soft spots in the areas I mow that it'd leave ruts from the weight, so this seems to make sense to me to load them. Is there any risk to the wheels by doing this?

 

I cut some of my main property with it, and I don't like running it on the slopes I have in my yard there. I think a large portion of that is that I'm just not as familiar with it/comfortable with it as I am with my Husqvarna lawn tractor, but the foot pedal drive on the Husky is a lot easier for me to manage when dealing with the terrain. Maybe over time that'll change. 

 

I trailered the Simplicity to the other property I'm listing for sale, and I cut that yard with it, which is a lot more level. That was a breeze, and it left a superb cut. Very pleased with that, and it's doing the job I wanted it for in the first place. Left it in my shed there so I can stop trailering a tractor to cut that property now. Thank goodness. 

 

I'll look for the rubber chains...that sounds like a good plan. I'm sort of anxious to get some snow to push with it now, lol. 

 

I've heard that the dozer blade should be waxed to prevent the snow from sticking.....any thoughts on that?


Edited by tddeangelo, September 26, 2016 - 07:43 AM.


#44 Cat385B ONLINE  

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Posted September 26, 2016 - 08:56 AM

I just taped the hose to the side of a step ladder and gravity fed windshield washer fluid into it. Takes longer, less investment.

Snow sticking to the plow is an issue when the snow is wet and the temp is warm, or you start plowing and the tractor was sitting in a heated shed. Parking outside and letting the blade get to the same temp works.

But, a smooth surface that is waxed or is freshly painted helps a bunch.

Edited by Cat385B, September 26, 2016 - 09:07 AM.


#45 tddeangelo OFFLINE  

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Posted September 26, 2016 - 10:42 AM

Painting is easy enough to do. Not sure what wax would go on it, but I'll hit google and see what I find. 

 

After mowing with that thing, it's a beast. I'm looking forward to using that dozer blade in the fall to push some small brush/weeds away that need cleaning up. I have little doubt it'll handle them. 






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