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Rock picking


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#1 backwoods OFFLINE  

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Posted September 10, 2016 - 10:01 PM

Today before pulling the weeds I hauled about five 5 gallon buckets out then I rolled it an git another seven out. Is there an easier way to rid a garden of large rocks or just picking them out over time? I'm going to regret the crawling around tomorrow as I'm already dealing the effects of it.
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#2 Gtractor ONLINE  

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Posted September 10, 2016 - 10:16 PM

You need to build a rock picker for the front of a garden tractor   Should be able to google it and see designs that work for farm tractors.  Just build it smaller.

 

Or a tow behind like this:

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=xvwNwyvPBMw


Edited by Gtractor, September 10, 2016 - 10:30 PM.

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#3 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted September 11, 2016 - 06:57 AM

I found that I had to strip off the top 2 feet of soil with a big tracked bucket loader and screan it all. Unfortuanately, the frost will push rocks to the surface each year. Its our spring crop of "Connecticut potatoes". When doing it by small machine, try a 4' York rake behind a GT. By hand, use a long handled, 4 tined. cultivator. The rocks that I collect go on the gravel driveway. Good Luck, Rick


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#4 CanadianHobbyFarmer OFFLINE  

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Posted September 11, 2016 - 07:05 AM

I am very lucky to have land that is nearly stone free. After working up my garden and pig pasture (around 9000 square feet combined) I won't find enough rock to half fill a 5 gallon bucket. My parents place is a different story and it sounds a lot like your place. They have been gardening in the same spot for over 30 years though and  have it virtually rock free now. It will take a few years, but you will get there.

 

Jim



#5 backwoods OFFLINE  

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Posted September 11, 2016 - 07:07 AM

Thanks for the tips guys im putting the rocks in spots that the water has washed the dirt away .

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#6 KC9KAS ONLINE  

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Posted September 11, 2016 - 08:27 AM

I worked for a fellow in residential construction and he also farmed.

He always said that rock in farm ground always worked up, but rock on a drive always worked down (into the ground)!


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#7 backwoods OFFLINE  

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Posted September 11, 2016 - 07:53 PM

That is a very true statement

#8 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted September 14, 2016 - 11:57 AM

Rocks are something I do not have much of. Glaciers did not come this far south in Iowa much.
North about 80 miles or so where my grandparents lived you could find rock in the field that were big as a pickup truck.




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