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Transplanting rhubarb


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#1 Dave S OFFLINE  

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Posted September 02, 2016 - 12:15 PM

I have 4 rhubarb plants that are in a shaded area after leaves come one. Rhubarb produces fairly well until that point but receives very little sun after leaves come on. I have a spot that receives more sun I'm thinking of moving the to. There 3 year old plants and I was wondering if I could move them now and if I should apply some kind of fall fertilizer.  Really enjoying this group, Every one has been so helpful. Thanks, Dave S


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#2 Reed Breneman OFFLINE  

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Posted September 02, 2016 - 12:36 PM

I have moved 2 year old and 6 year old plants in september and they did just fine ,now I live in nw missouri by the iowa line that may make a differance but I think your probably still safe


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#3 crittersf1 OFFLINE  

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Posted September 02, 2016 - 02:21 PM

When it came to Rhubarb, if it needed to be moved we moved it. Never seemed to bother it. Extremely hardy plant


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#4 secondtry OFFLINE  

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Posted September 02, 2016 - 02:39 PM

 Yep Rhubarb is tough stuff many years ago when I was 5 yo living near Kemmer Wyoming my parents were given a big root. They chopped it into 4 pieces buried them and dumped water to them. At an altitude over 6000 where we saw snow in may we had 4 thriving plants and gave away rhubarb.  Although I'm not sure they like full sun.  Don


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#5 MiCarl OFFLINE  

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Posted September 02, 2016 - 03:12 PM

I had a rhubarb plant cut from the one on the old family farm.  At my previous house I stuck it in a patch of hard clay between the driveway and back porch.  Even weeds wouldn't grow there.  The thing practically exploded.  Every fall I'd cut off pieces of root and give away to people wanting plants.

 

I brought 2 pieces to the new house with sandy soil.  Shortly after moving we got a dog.  Every day the dog would pee on the one plant and it did well.  The other one struggled wherever I put it.

 

Then the dog got kidney disease.  Both he and the rhubarb died.

 

I moved my remaining root to the spot where the other had thrived.  It's always struggled there.  The spot is fairly shady.  I thought the drought this summer had done it in but after we got rain a stem and leaf shot up.

 

I've reached the conclusion that rhubarb likes the hardest, fully baked, sunny soil available.


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#6 secondtry OFFLINE  

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Posted September 02, 2016 - 05:52 PM

 Ok I tried to post a link My bad  Try googling rubarbinfo.com   Don


Edited by secondtry, September 02, 2016 - 07:17 PM.

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#7 FrozenInTime OFFLINE  

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Posted September 04, 2016 - 11:25 AM

Our place came with a small patch.  It was between some pine trees, prev.. owners complained they did not get much from them.  I moved them mid summer into a spot with full sun and watered weekly for 2 years.  I now have more rhubarb that I can eat, give lots of it away.  Sure some good tasting stuff!


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#8 New.Canadian.DB.Owner OFFLINE  

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Posted September 04, 2016 - 12:03 PM

...  I now have more rhubarb that I can eat, give lots of it away.  Sure some good tasting stuff!

 

Freeze 16 lbs of diced rhubarb for 1 week. Thaw.  Place in nylon mesh bag overnight with 10 lbs white sugar. Add water to 5 gallons, 1 tspn pectic enzyme, and 1 campden tablet.  Let sit overnight.  Add 1 packet of 1118 yeast. Stir twice daily for 4 days.  Remove bag and let drip (don't squeeze it!).  Rack in 10 days and again 30, 90, & 180 days later.  Bottle, enjoy, & never go back to grapes.


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#9 Dave S OFFLINE  

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Posted September 06, 2016 - 04:14 PM

After tomatoes and cucumbers were removed from in between the asparagus I relocated the rhubarb there. Looked kind of tuff the first couple days but looking better today. I don't have a lot of places that get sun most of the day. I planted 10 asparagus crowns this spring, 9 of them have stalks and one didn't do anything. Hopefully the rhubarb will do better in this location20160904_134039.jpg



#10 FrozenInTime OFFLINE  

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Posted September 09, 2016 - 12:04 AM

Freeze 16 lbs of diced rhubarb for 1 week. Thaw.  Place in nylon mesh bag overnight with 10 lbs white sugar. Add water to 5 gallons, 1 tspn pectic enzyme, and 1 campden tablet.  Let sit overnight.  Add 1 packet of 1118 yeast. Stir twice daily for 4 days.  Remove bag and let drip (don't squeeze it!).  Rack in 10 days and again 30, 90, & 180 days later.  Bottle, enjoy, & never go back to grapes.

I will have to try this.  I already make beer and hard cider.  Thanks!






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