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#1 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted August 31, 2016 - 08:49 PM

A couple of years ago, there was a small bulldozer at Zagray (big local show). I of course was attracted to its OD color. The owner said that it was used by Airborne Units in WWII. It was mega kool. I posted some pics of it at the time. He had done a beautiful restoration of it.

 

Tonight I came across this  https://www.youtube....h?v=V8D_5_qsEik  . There were abunch of these small lightweight machines for use by Airbourne Combat Engineers. The grader looked alot like the one someone called Harry Trumans' grader. Enjoy. Good Luck, Rick


Edited by boyscout862, September 01, 2016 - 01:33 AM.

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#2 propane1 ONLINE  

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Posted August 31, 2016 - 09:37 PM

You tube didn't work. But, could be just me or my phone. Although some work. I can't figure it out. Oh well. But am very interested. My father was in the second war. Drove a Sherman tank. Canadian army. Am I right in what he drove, this is just what I know. Tanks different from US to Canada. ? His rank was Trooper.

Noel
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#3 UncleWillie ONLINE  

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Posted August 31, 2016 - 11:02 PM

Found this while watching the other video

 


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#4 Texas Deere and Horse OFFLINE  

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Posted August 31, 2016 - 11:18 PM

Thanks Rick, very cool!!


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#5 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted September 01, 2016 - 01:55 AM

You tube didn't work. But, could be just me or my phone. Although some work. I can't figure it out. Oh well. But am very interested. My father was in the second war. Drove a Sherman tank. Canadian army. Am I right in what he drove, this is just what I know. Tanks different from US to Canada. ? His rank was Trooper.

Noel

The M4 Shermans were used by everyone. I think there was 50,000 of them built. The thinking was quantity not quality. The krauts even used captured ones. Your father was lucky to survive because the German guns would go right through them. Tankers and flyers had the highest casualties in WWII. The Germans nick named the Shermans "tommy cookers" because they would burn so easily. The British added their 76.2mm main gun so that it would have a better punch. They were known as "fireflys" but there wasn't nearly enough of them in Europe. Later, all had the 76.2mm main gun and were known as the "easy 8" model. This was used in Korea.

 

There was a series of shows about armor battles on TV, 10 years ago. One of the people was a Canadian Trooper talking about some of his close calls. I really liked the guy because he was very understated and matter-of-fact about some very scary situations. I think that I later learned that he was Canada's top tank Ace. Try to see it to have a better understanding of what your dad went through. Good Luck, Rick

 

I tested the link and it worked for me.


Edited by boyscout862, September 01, 2016 - 01:58 AM.

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#6 toomanytoys84 OFFLINE  

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Posted September 01, 2016 - 07:24 AM

My favorite part of the whole video "1" planking should be put down to avoid damage to the bottom of the air craft"
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#7 UncleWillie ONLINE  

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Posted September 01, 2016 - 08:28 AM

The M4 Shermans were used by everyone. I think there was 50,000 of them built. The thinking was quantity not quality. The krauts even used captured ones. Your father was lucky to survive because the German guns would go right through them. Tankers and flyers had the highest casualties in WWII. The Germans nick named the Shermans "tommy cookers" because they would burn so easily. The British added their 76.2mm main gun so that it would have a better punch. They were known as "fireflys" but there wasn't nearly enough of them in Europe. Later, all had the 76.2mm main gun and were known as the "easy 8" model. This was used in Korea.

 

There was a series of shows about armor battles on TV, 10 years ago. One of the people was a Canadian Trooper talking about some of his close calls. I really liked the guy because he was very understated and matter-of-fact about some very scary situations. I think that I later learned that he was Canada's top tank Ace. Try to see it to have a better understanding of what your dad went through. Good Luck, Rick

 

I tested the link and it worked for me.

The Allies won on manufacturing ability (98% USA) over the Germans.

 

The German planes had fuel injection and could maneuver more rapidly without loosing power vs the carbureted allied aircraft for the most part. Especially at the beginning of the war. WHile no US planes were fuel injected they did improve handling and tactics to gain the upper hand. (For example in a dogfight if a ME-109 and a P-51 were in a dog fight the ME could simply push down and dive without stalling the engine, the 51 pilots eventually learned to invert then dive to keep the fuel flowing.) The one thing the Germans could not do was make more planes than the US.At the beginning of the war the P-40s were completely outclassed by German Technology. The Spitfire was more than equal, but could not be produced in enough numbers. Once planes such as the P-47, 38,51 came into production the Luftwaffe began to decline. However if planes like the ME 262 had been put into service in larger numbers, and as a fighter as intended instead of a bomber like Hitler demanded, it wudl have been a very different story. 

 

The German tanks were far superior to the US tanks. When the US first entered the war there was not a single piece for mechanized artillery that could damage a German tank unless it got very lucky.

 

I read a book written by a US tank mechanic during WWII and he talked about the huge number of tanks lost that had to be replaced ever night. They would scavenge through the destroyed tanks for parts to repair the functioning ones. He was one of the ones that helped improve armor and armament for the Shermans to make them somewhat competitive. The main problem we the Sherman's ammo storage so close to the hull. One hit and the whole thing was a rolling bomb.

 

There was one story of a battle where Sherman's were against Panzers. One Sherman was sitting just below grade in defilade. Panzers crested the embankment without knowing the Shermans were there and began to shell a town. One tank pulled up and stopped directly in front of the Sherman's barrel. The crew began to fire as rapidly as they could. After several round at very close range they discovered they were damaging themselves more than the Panzer and managed to escape without the Kraut crew ever figuring out what was beating on their hull.

 

In the end, it was the destruction of Axis supplies and manufacturing, and the overwhelming superiority of the Allied ability to resupply that won the day in Europe.


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#8 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted September 01, 2016 - 10:03 AM

The Allies won on manufacturing ability (98% USA) over the Germans.

 

The German planes had fuel injection and could maneuver more rapidly without loosing power vs the carbureted allied aircraft for the most part. Especially at the beginning of the war. WHile no US planes were fuel injected they did improve handling and tactics to gain the upper hand. (For example in a dogfight if a ME-109 and a P-51 were in a dog fight the ME could simply push down and dive without stalling the engine, the 51 pilots eventually learned to invert then dive to keep the fuel flowing.) The one thing the Germans could not do was make more planes than the US.At the beginning of the war the P-40s were completely outclassed by German Technology. The Spitfire was more than equal, but could not be produced in enough numbers. Once planes such as the P-47, 38,51 came into production the Luftwaffe began to decline. However if planes like the ME 262 had been put into service in larger numbers, and as a fighter as intended instead of a bomber like Hitler demanded, it wudl have been a very different story. 

 

The German tanks were far superior to the US tanks. When the US first entered the war there was not a single piece for mechanized artillery that could damage a German tank unless it got very lucky.

 

I read a book written by a US tank mechanic during WWII and he talked about the huge number of tanks lost that had to be replaced ever night. They would scavenge through the destroyed tanks for parts to repair the functioning ones. He was one of the ones that helped improve armor and armament for the Shermans to make them somewhat competitive. The main problem we the Sherman's ammo storage so close to the hull. One hit and the whole thing was a rolling bomb.

 

There was one story of a battle where Sherman's were against Panzers. One Sherman was sitting just below grade in defilade. Panzers crested the embankment without knowing the Shermans were there and began to shell a town. One tank pulled up and stopped directly in front of the Sherman's barrel. The crew began to fire as rapidly as they could. After several round at very close range they discovered they were damaging themselves more than the Panzer and managed to escape without the Kraut crew ever figuring out what was beating on their hull.

 

In the end, it was the destruction of Axis supplies and manufacturing, and the overwhelming superiority of the Allied ability to resupply that won the day in Europe.

In early JAN45 the US Army fielded the new M24 tank that was a match for the krauts. A famous battle filmed in a German city in spring 1945 shows the results. A panther kills an  M4 and the M24 kills the panther but the german crew mostly excapes. The loader on the M24 was outstanding, about two seconds per round. One problem with the US tanks was they were gas burning and easy to get burning. The Germans used diesels and had better armor. There equipment was much more complicated and harder to maintain.

 

One on my college professors told me about fighting in spring 45 in Germany. He saw a tank crew that was supporting his infantry unit go through 4 M4s in a single day. Each time they just hitched a ride back to a supply area and signed out a new M4. In the "its a small world department", his oldest son and I were in the same squad in the Army.

 

He also had a story about the M24 tanks. His platoon had taken over a German town. After clearing it they were headed back to the company area. When they got to the edge of town, they noticed several big new tanks that they couldn't identify. Figuring that they were German, the platoon hid in a Champagne warehouse for 3 days. The entire platoon enjoyed the stay. He said that they had to shave using champgne. Only in the Army! The tanks left, when they got back to the company area was when they learned that the tanks were ours.

 

In the end it was a lack of fuel that really stopped the nazis. They ran out of fuel for the planes and tanks, which allowed our Dads to destroy them. Good Luck, Rick


Edited by boyscout862, September 01, 2016 - 10:04 AM.

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#9 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted September 01, 2016 - 10:08 AM

My favorite part of the whole video "1" planking should be put down to avoid damage to the bottom of the air craft"

I was wondering how many gooney birds were damaged during loading and unloading.


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#10 UncleWillie ONLINE  

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Posted September 01, 2016 - 10:21 AM

In early JAN45 the US Army fielded the new M24 tank that was a match for the krauts. A famous battle filmed in a German city in spring 1945 shows the results. A panther kills an  M4 and the M24 kills the panther but the german crew mostly excapes. The loader on the M24 was outstanding, about two seconds per round. One problem with the US tanks was they were gas burning and easy to get burning. The Germans used diesels and had better armor. There equipment was much more complicated and harder to maintain.

 

One on my college professors told me about fighting in spring 45 in Germany. He saw a tank crew that was supporting his infantry unit go through 4 M4s in a single day. Each time they just hitched a ride back to a supply area and signed out a new M4. In the "its a small world department", his oldest son and I were in the same squad in the Army.

 

He also had a story about the M24 tanks. His platoon had taken over a German town. After clearing it they were headed back to the company area. When they got to the edge of town, they noticed several big new tanks that they couldn't identify. Figuring that they were German, the platoon hid in a Champagne warehouse for 3 days. The entire platoon enjoyed the stay. He said that they had to shave using champgne. Only in the Army! The tanks left, when they got back to the company area was when they learned that the tanks were ours.

 

In the end it was a lack of fuel that really stopped the nazis. They ran out of fuel for the planes and tanks, which allowed our Dads to destroy them. Good Luck, Rick

The M24 was a huge game changer no doubt. It was finally a machine that could give the Germans a run for their money. It was still al little under gunned, but a vast improvement to the M3 and M4. The lack of fuel for the German troops was a huge detriment, but they could not keep up with the US manufacturing due to lack of raw materials. The US had everything it needed to produce arms. The Germans were having to bring it in from other sources and as they lost land it was impossible. 

 

One unsung fact of WWII is that the US just flat out supplied the Axis. Decimating the German industrial infrastructure didn't hurt either. The US daylight bombing raids were fat superior to the British nighttime raids, Far more accurate. They had higher losses, but then again that supply chain comes into play. Loose a B-24, get a new one. It wasn't quite that simple, but pretty close. Towards the end of the war if the Germans lost a Junkers 111 they just lost it. No replacements machines or good pilots. 

 

 

BTW I am currently reading Jimmy Doolittle's auto biography "I could never be so lucky again" if you haven't read it it is well worth the time. (And for those who saw in the hat thread that I have been reading it for a while - it is hard to concentrate when you hurt. I will finish it soon - maybe.) 


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#11 camdigger ONLINE  

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Posted September 01, 2016 - 10:34 AM

A couple of years ago, there was a small bulldozer at Zagray (big local show). I of course was attracted to its OD color. The owner said that it was used by Airborne Units in WWII. It was mega kool. I posted some pics of it at the time. He had done a beautiful restoration of it.
 
Tonight I came across this  https://www.youtube....h?v=V8D_5_qsEik  . There were abunch of these small lightweight machines for use by Airbourne Combat Engineers. The grader looked alot like the one someone called Harry Trumans' grader. Enjoy. Good Luck, Rick


Neat stuff. The equipment here is roughly the same Hp as the loader I built.

The other thing I note is that the " pulvie mixer" used to blend the asphalt looks suspiciously like a beefed up roto tiller you might used in your garden. FWIW, there were large 250+ HP units used for land breaking, and the very popular forestry mulchers work on the same principle as the asphalt mixers, just with different teeth.
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#12 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted September 01, 2016 - 10:51 AM

The M24 was a huge game changer no doubt. It was finally a machine that could give the Germans a run for their money. It was still al little under gunned, but a vast improvement to the M3 and M4. The lack of fuel for the German troops was a huge detriment, but they could not keep up with the US manufacturing due to lack of raw materials. The US had everything it needed to produce arms. The Germans were having to bring it in from other sources and as they lost land it was impossible. 

 

One unsung fact of WWII is that the US just flat out supplied the Axis. Decimating the German industrial infrastructure didn't hurt either. The US daylight bombing raids were fat superior to the British nighttime raids, Far more accurate. They had higher losses, but then again that supply chain comes into play. Loose a B-24, get a new one. It wasn't quite that simple, but pretty close. Towards the end of the war if the Germans lost a Junkers 111 they just lost it. No replacements machines or good pilots. 

 

 

BTW I am currently reading Jimmy Doolittle's auto biography "I could never be so lucky again" if you haven't read it it is well worth the time. (And for those who saw in the hat thread that I have been reading it for a while - it is hard to concentrate when you hurt. I will finish it soon - maybe.) 

Willie, I'm sorry to hear that you are hurting. Reading is a great escape from pain if the story is very well written. When I was in Walter Reed they couldn't give me anything for the pain because my liver was down to 10% function. Dr Brock(a psychiatrist) was brought in to teach me self-hypnosis. It worked for escaping pain. Little by little I increased my painfree times up to a couple of hours. I found that reading does the same for me when it is a really interesting story. I just read about D-Day by Stephen Ambrose. It draws you in and you lose track of all else(including pain). When done right, I would fall asleep (another escape from pain) after awhile of self-hypnosis. I hope that you heal fast. Good Luck, Rick

 

BTW In the late 1980s or early 90s, my friends' younger brother was a Navy officer in California. The local bookstore on base had a book sale and signing with General Dolittle. Chris missed it but learned that the General lived nearby and was very friendly to active service members. Chris bought several of the books and called the Generals' house. He got to visit with the General for a long while but then the General fell asleep. His daughter told Chris to leave the books and she would get them signed. My friend has one of them.


Edited by boyscout862, September 01, 2016 - 10:57 AM.

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#13 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted September 01, 2016 - 10:56 AM

Neat stuff. The equipment here is roughly the same Hp as the loader I built.

The other thing I note is that the " pulvie mixer" used to blend the asphalt looks suspiciously like a beefed up roto tiller you might used in your garden. FWIW, there were large 250+ HP units used for land breaking, and the very popular forestry mulchers work on the same principle as the asphalt mixers, just with different teeth.

It is a beefed up rototiller. They are still around today but in a much bigger machine and its usually called "recycling" a road now. Sometimes they are setup with ashalt sprayers in the machine so that the end product just needs to be graded and rolled to give a new paved surface. Good Luck, Rick



#14 toomanytoys84 OFFLINE  

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Posted September 01, 2016 - 02:11 PM

I was wondering how many gooney birds were damaged during loading and unloading.

I figure that was the least of their worries...

My grandfather had a friend that was in the sea bees. He told a few stories of being in the Pacific during ww2 and building run ways with bullets pinging off the side of the dozer. That's about all I remember him saying. Only other thing I remember is that he was one tough sob..

Edited by toomanytoys84, September 01, 2016 - 02:12 PM.

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#15 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted September 01, 2016 - 02:18 PM

I figure that was the least of their worries...

My grandfather had a friend that was in the sea bees. He told a few stories of being in the Pacific during ww2 and building run ways with bullets pinging off the side of the dozer. That's about all I remember him saying. Only other thing I remember is that he was one tough sob..

They were! Products of the Great Depression and hard work. Some times the dozers were used to bury active fighting positions. A dozer with a full blade of earth is relatively immune to most fire from the front. Bury the position well and that problem is solved.


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