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Getting a stuck exhaust pipe out of head on my PK 2414


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#1 SNUFFY OFFLINE  

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Posted August 08, 2016 - 09:30 AM

aI hope somebody else might be able to use my method for removing a stuck threaded pipe exhaust and save them some pain.
After doing a little studying of manuals, pics and what not on the web, I see 2 methods to attach the exhaust to the head. A 2 hole flange and screw in pipe threads. Mine came with a piece of thin wall threaded pipe about 2 inches long with a hole drilled in it to hold the next pc of pipe in place. That next joint had no real seal I could find when I took it apart so it was bound to leak after it warmed up a little.
I`ve seen some pics of a 2 bolt flange that were cast steel elbows that would probably work good but would wind up going to threads any way. Remembering back to my Honda 125 days they nearly always wound up leaking too and finding the cast steel piece probably would be hard I`ve decided to do the screw in pipe to head option.
So to remove the pipe screwed in the head , I knew there was about a 0% chance of backing it out with a pipe wrench ....and I was right. Yes I had soaked it with PB Blaster too. Pipe just egged..I also tried drilling 2 holes and sticking a bar thru for better leverage ....no luck..so I get the drill and put a course rotary file tapered bit in it. The files are designed for use with one of those 10RPM air motors and they work great in my line of work but can be hard to control. I`ve found that a standard drill works pretty good on the high speed setting. Using the round tip on the end, start working a groove on the inside of the pipe in the head and work it to the outside end of the pipe. Once you get it down into the head threads a little bit and have it completely thru the outside of the head threads you can take a chisel or punch and kind of fold the pipe to the inside ....then it will pop loose and out it comes. I have had to do a couple of grooves on larger pipes at work to get it loose but just one on the engine was enough.
Just take your time inside the head and it will come out with little damage to the threads. The new threads on the pipe will fill the groove OK. Copper based Hi -Temp anti seize will work good as a thread sealer and at least give you a chance at unscrewing it the next time. Not exactly sure how and where I will mount my muffler yet but will probably install a welded union some where for easy removal ! I will update when I get there !
Also got some new parts to install to help start up !

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#2 HANKG OFFLINE  

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Posted August 08, 2016 - 05:16 PM

Thought I saw a thread here about using a sawsall two cuts carefully came right out.


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#3 jabelman OFFLINE  

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Posted August 08, 2016 - 06:47 PM

make 1 relief cut with the air saw and then the air hammer with the point bit and they come out in about a minute
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#4 KC9KAS OFFLINE  

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Posted August 08, 2016 - 07:09 PM

I have had to cut a couple of pipe nipples out before and I use a tap to "chase" the threads.

This cleans up any boogered up threads as well as cleans the carbon out of some of the threads way back in the block.


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#5 classic ONLINE  

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Posted August 08, 2016 - 09:15 PM

I've fought with more than a few of these, but the last one was a real nightmare. Someone screwed a thick walled galvanized elbow into the block, and this thing would not budge after soaking and mild heat. I had to use the edge of a file to file two 1/4" grooves opposite of each other. I must have hit the punch I was using 1000 times before the first half pulled free from the threads. You would think the other half would come out easily, but nope. This thing was bonded to the block like it was soldered in place. Anyway after hours of messing with it, I got it out without damaging the block or threads. I don't give up easily, but this thing really tested my patients.

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#6 SNUFFY OFFLINE  

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Posted August 09, 2016 - 06:44 AM

I know what your saying about giving up Classic...I`m hard headed like that too. I was lucky mine was a thin wall pipe. In my younger days I would have lost my cool numerous times on this rebuild. It took 10000 licks with a 1 pound hammer to get the flywheel off the engine....no exaggeration !!


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#7 classic ONLINE  

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Posted August 09, 2016 - 08:27 AM

At least we didn't get out the big sledge to get revenge, HA! With time, we learn to expect that things just don't come apart without patients. I had to drill out the set screw on the '56 PK flywheel since they were rounded out and there was no hope of removing them. The engine was trashed when I bought the tractor, and the flywheel seemed to become bonded to the crankshaft and would not budge. I ended up removing the crankshaft from the engine and drove the crankshaft out of the flywheel with a big brass punch. It took 1000 shots with a hammer, but I finally got it without destroying anything.
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#8 SNUFFY OFFLINE  

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Posted August 10, 2016 - 09:21 AM

I bought a rubber hammer when I was about 20 mainly to take out my rages on the big Chrome bumpers we had back then.....you couldn`t hurt them things.... !



#9 SNUFFY OFFLINE  

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Posted August 10, 2016 - 09:26 AM

I have had to cut a couple of pipe nipples out before and I use a tap to "chase" the threads.

This cleans up any boogered up threads as well as cleans the carbon out of some of the threads way back in the block.

In my work a lot of time your cutting out nipple in pumps and such stuff and you had to save them somehow..... I found for lack of a tap I could cut some grooves in a nipple and straiten up the threads and use it like Tap....actually what I did with this motor.....Have to take your time and back it up a lot and clean up the shavings. The nearest tap I have access to is 40 miles up the road.


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#10 29 Chev ONLINE  

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Posted August 10, 2016 - 10:02 AM

A suggestion to keep the pipe from egging or collapsing if you are trying to use a pipe wrench would be to take another piece of thick wall pipe, round piece of steel or a large 1/2" drive socket that is a snug fit inside the pipe - shim with some sheet metal to make it snug if too loose.  If using a socket place the part where the 1/2" drive goes in about the centre of where the pipe wrench will put pressure on the pipe as this will be the strongest part of the socket.


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#11 KC9KAS OFFLINE  

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Posted August 10, 2016 - 03:43 PM

A suggestion to keep the pipe from egging or collapsing if you are trying to use a pipe wrench would be to take another piece of thick wall pipe, round piece of steel or a large 1/2" drive socket that is a snug fit inside the pipe - shim with some sheet metal to make it snug if too loose.  If using a socket place the part where the 1/2" drive goes in about the centre of where the pipe wrench will put pressure on the pipe as this will be the strongest part of the socket.

I too have used sockets inside a piece of pipe to keep it from "egg-shaping"!

I also thread a lot of schedule 80 PVC and insert a pipe fitting inside the PVC to keep it round while cutting new threads.


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#12 a.graham52 OFFLINE  

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Posted August 18, 2016 - 01:40 PM

Not that it was the best choice, but I got mine out using a 4ft pipe wrench and some dead weight.




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