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Tires Stuck on Rims


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#1 Pastorsteve OFFLINE  

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Posted August 05, 2016 - 07:47 AM

I landed a pair of 23x10.5x12 ag tires for my 300. The tires were mounted several years ago but never put on the tractor. However the tubes are calcium filled and appear to have leaked some. I'd like to remove from rims, sandblast and replace tubes. Problem is I can't break the bead to get them off. Lots of rust and I don't want to damage the tires. I could take them to a shop or buy a mounting outfit but wondered about suggestions or secrets I'm missing. Thanks in advance.

#2 TimW OFFLINE  

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Posted August 05, 2016 - 08:13 AM

I use the bead breaker I linked below.  You can fight with them using screw drivers, pry bars and other bead tools, but it is just a tough job.  It is also hard to do without hurting the bead.  Spraying WD40 around the bead seems to help.  If a tire shop will do it for 5-10 bucks and your time and mental health are worth anything, I would let them do it.  Maybe somebody has a quick tip, but I have never found anything easy without a bead breaker, and the cheap Harbor Freight breakers only make me madder on really stuck beads.

 

http://www.northernt...22827_200322827


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#3 johndeereelfman OFFLINE  

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Posted August 05, 2016 - 08:52 AM

I spray PB Blaster around the edge of the rim and let that work it's way down between the rim and tire bead. Let it sit a day then start prying down on the tire bead using the rim edge as a leverage point, with a large flat head screwdriver, and only prying down a little bit at a time. Don't try to break the bead all at once in just one area, slowly work your way around the entire rim edge.

 

I have tried the WD-40, but found it softens the rubber too much and in your case, if the bead is rusted fast to the rim due to calcium, the WD-40 won't separate the bead from the rim, however it will cause separation elsewhere ruining the bead. I never sat down and read the chemical differences between WD-40 and PB Blaster, but something is different as the PB Blaster doesn't absorb into the rubber as much as the WD-40. 

 

Just my 2 cents worth, so take it for what it is. Good Luck to ya! 


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#4 secondtry OFFLINE  

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Posted August 05, 2016 - 09:02 AM

I use the bead breaker I linked below.  You can fight with them using screw drivers, pry bars and other bead tools, but it is just a tough job.  It is also hard to do without hurting the bead.  Spraying WD40 around the bead seems to help.  If a tire shop will do it for 5-10 bucks and your time and mental health are worth anything, I would let them do it.  Maybe somebody has a quick tip, but I have never found anything easy without a bead breaker, and the cheap Harbor Freight breakers only make me madder on really stuck beads.

 

http://www.northernt...22827_200322827

That thing looks mean, How does it work? would it be possible to get a picture of it applied to a tire/rim? Thanks     Don



#5 Trav1s ONLINE  

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Posted August 05, 2016 - 09:03 AM

I have one that I have not been able to break loose by driving my Jeep Grand Cherokee over it.  In this case (and possibly yours), a local tire shop with an air powered tire changer might be the best bet.  I'd look for a place that works with ag tires or heavy equipment.


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#6 secondtry OFFLINE  

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Posted August 05, 2016 - 09:20 AM

That thing looks mean, How does it work? would it be possible to get a picture of it applied to a tire/rim? Thanks     Don

    Ok I googled it. 

Ok I googled "ESCO Manual Bead Breaker, Model# 70160"     In the resulting image results it shows how that bead breaker works and then you can continue and spend the rest of your day studying bead breakers of every size type and description. (Isn't this interesting? copy/pasting that link seams to have changed my font.) I don't know if that will be permanent or not.   Don

                                


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#7 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted August 05, 2016 - 09:26 AM

I don't like what screwdrivers do to beads. PB Blaster is more of a rust desolver so, use it. Give it time. I have several bead breakers, including a pnuematic but when working with something that I want to save, I use an old bumper jack. The base of the jack can be pushed up against the rim and the top hooked to something stationery and heavy(an old truck). Pump the jack until there is a good amount of pressure and spray the bead area with PB. Let it sit. A few hours later, pump the jack alittle more and spray with PB. IF nothing is moving, get a tire spoon(has wide and rounded edges)and hammer it into the bead at each side of the jack. Spray some more. Let it sit. Slowly work your way out from the jack until the bead slides off. Good Luck, Rick
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#8 propane1 ONLINE  

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Posted August 05, 2016 - 09:43 AM

I use a hard wood board with the end cut to fit the rim. Put it in place and drive my truck on the board. Have to turn the rim around a few times, but I normally get them broke down, but a tire shop is easier method.

Noel
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#9 ducky ONLINE  

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Posted August 05, 2016 - 11:20 AM

I am with the tire shop idea.  $10 and you are done.



#10 larrybl ONLINE  

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Posted August 05, 2016 - 12:45 PM

Ohhhh I need that style bead breaker. Added to my wish list! Thanks :rocker2:



#11 jimmy G ONLINE  

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Posted August 05, 2016 - 07:02 PM

I have a slide hammer made just for tractor tires and it works great on chloride treated rims, very fast and and let's you go around the tire as easy or hard as you want, as said above, the old style bumper Jack's work just fine and I have one behind a co-op E3 with loaded 38s that I use on car and truck tire's and the good part is it doesn't hurt the tire, the bad part is it can be dangerous many ways. penny penny

#12 DH1 OFFLINE  

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Posted August 05, 2016 - 08:20 PM

This works but requires a high degree of accuracy.

The Canadian way.

 

 

post-62-0-51508600-1378511576.jpg

post-62-0-09448500-1378511588.jpg

post-62-0-11585500-1378511604.jpg


Edited by DH1, August 05, 2016 - 08:21 PM.

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#13 larrybl ONLINE  

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Posted August 05, 2016 - 08:23 PM

This works but requires a high degree of accuracy.

The Canadian way.

 

 

attachicon.gifpost-62-0-51508600-1378511576.jpg

attachicon.gifpost-62-0-09448500-1378511588.jpg

attachicon.gifpost-62-0-11585500-1378511604.jpg

I think I'll spend the money on a proper bead breaker, Broken foot will cost more.


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#14 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted August 05, 2016 - 08:24 PM

Steel toes not optional
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#15 DH1 OFFLINE  

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Posted August 05, 2016 - 08:44 PM

https://www.youtube....h?v=sl9LN6iJe4Q






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