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Bolens Husky 750 - Transmission


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#31 dtsh ONLINE  

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Posted June 12, 2017 - 11:43 PM

I've other tasks on the top of my stack currently, but the new bearings and seals are here.

 

Also, while I was cleaning up the axle gear assembly I noticed the two bevel gears (1714917 Bevel Gear - 22T) have some noticeable wear on them. I am guessing this went for a while without having the rear axle end-play adjustment performed. They look salvageable and considering it's 50 this year, they should last another 25-50 years.


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#32 dtsh ONLINE  

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Posted June 16, 2017 - 09:40 AM

No pictures today, but I got the axle and attached gear cluster installed. replacing the drive pin was fairly easy, just a repeat of removal (heat one side and drive the pin with a punch).

 

High winds brought down a bunch of willow branches at home, so a lot of my free-time will be taken up removing them, thus making my already slow progress slower.


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#33 dtsh ONLINE  

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Posted June 19, 2017 - 07:09 PM

To help with describing the parts, I am including images of the relevant portions of the manual.

 

Transmission-diag1.png    Transmission-diag2.png

 

Today I managed to get the bottom/middle gear(56) reinserted; it is sealed off by an O-ring on the shaft, which remains stationary and the gear (1713412 - Gear 28T) spins on it with a bronze bearing. The shaft is held in place with a roll pin on the outside of the casing.

 

 

After that I removed the old needle bearing(50) and pressed the new one (1185280).

 

It was then that I started on needle bearing(30), which I was forced to stop on due to a part mismatch. It seems the original needle bearing (1185165) and the replacement aren't quite the same size. According to my vernier caliper, the OD/ID of the original bearing is 0.640/0.5 and the OD/ID of the replacement is 0.75/0.575

 

Until I can get this sorted out the project is on hold. It's almost done...almost.


Edited by dtsh, June 19, 2017 - 07:10 PM.

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#34 dtsh ONLINE  

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Posted June 19, 2017 - 08:00 PM

It was then that I started on needle bearing(30), which I was forced to stop on due to a part mismatch. It seems the original needle bearing (1185165) and the replacement aren't quite the same size. According to my vernier caliper, the OD/ID of the original bearing is 0.640/0.5 and the OD/ID of the replacement is 0.75/0.575

 

Until I can get this sorted out the project is on hold. It's almost done...almost.

 

A sign of a great vendor is when, well after business hours, they respond to your email with a few questions which resolves the issue within 15 minutes of the first contact. A replacement should be enroute to me shortly.


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#35 dtsh ONLINE  

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Posted June 22, 2017 - 10:56 PM

My missing bearing arrived today and with the help of some threaded rod, nuts, and some washers, I pressed it into place.

 

The rest of it went back together easily with the exception of the snaprings on the input shaft, but that mostly due to my very poor snapring pliers. I highly recommend a nice pair of 90 degree pliers for the snapring at the far back of the input shaft.

 

Last for today, I followed the procedure for the rear axle endplay adjustment to make sure the slop in the axle was properly tightened up.

 

IMG_20170622_214807.jpg IMG_20170622_214812.jpg IMG_20170622_214929.jpg IMG_20170622_214940.jpg


Edited by dtsh, June 22, 2017 - 11:01 PM.

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#36 dtsh ONLINE  

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Posted June 25, 2017 - 12:12 AM

I had missed a part, the brake lining 1713777, so that will come later while I wait for the part to arrive.

 

Today's work on it involved replacing the drive bearing(109) right behind the main drive pulley(112).

 

750-driveline4.png 750-driveline6.png

 

I loosened the two set screws holding the pulley onto the driveshaft and even with a bit of heat it didn't want to come off so rather than fight with it I disconnected the bearing support(110) bracket to slide the entire assembly out so I could work on it at the bench. I had to remove the PTO housing as well to get the driveshaft out, but that's a simple matter of removing 3 bolts.

 

At the bench, I used heat and an old socket just slightly smaller than the shaft as a punch to drive the shaft out of the pulley. Once the two were separate, it was easy to remove the 3 bolts holding the bearing flange together and disassemble.

 

IMG_20170624_224328.jpg

 

It was relatively easy to remove the setscrew on the adapter bearing collar and twist it off the bearing, then drive the bearing off the shaft. The new bearing came with a new 2 hole flange, but the bolt holes are not the same so I reused the original 3 hole Fafnir flange with the new bearing.

 

IMG_20170624_225624.jpg

 

For anyone who hasn't ever handled this type of bearing before, the inner race of the bearing is longer than the outer race and a separate collar binds it to the shaft. The collar and the inner race are slightly oblong, so it's a matter of lining them up then twisting the collar to lock it into place. When you do so, try to ensure you're binding it in the direction of spin so it won't work loose under load.

 

If you look closely at the collar and inner race, you'll see they are really oblong, which is what helps them bind to the shaft.

IMG_20170624_231556.jpg


Edited by dtsh, June 25, 2017 - 12:13 AM.

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#37 dtsh ONLINE  

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Posted June 26, 2017 - 09:37 PM

I may have made a terrible mistake. Earlier today I noticed the paint on the bearing support was missing in a few areas, so I sanded the bearing support bracket and put a couple coats of paint on it. Once I did that I realized I should probably do the same with the driveshaft itself and that lead to more parts....


Edited by dtsh, June 26, 2017 - 09:44 PM.

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#38 dtsh ONLINE  

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Posted June 29, 2017 - 03:26 PM

I forgot to take any pictures during the process, but I welded a couple of minor cracks in the rear panel / steering cowl, then ground and sanded them down. Primed the panel and painted a few other small parts.

 

Next task will be to dismantle the mounting plate assembly and foot rests, get them cleaned, patched, and painted.


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#39 dtsh ONLINE  

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Posted July 03, 2017 - 05:50 PM

Once again, I got ahead of myself and didn't take pictures before I started repairing. The clutch rod (1717362) had a lot of wear at the upper end of the rod where it rubs against the clutch control arm assembly (1717338) and was worn nearly halfway through. I filled in the worn spots with weld, ground it down close, then finished it up with files to smooth out the rough spots.

 

Did effectively the same thing to the rod inside the lift arm, though it was worn significantly less. Built up the low points with welds, ground them down, then smoothed it all down with files.

 

I'm currently trying to get the steering gear and steering arm off the cross shaft. We went a short round with the smoke wrench, but they're still stuck on there so I hit it with some penetrating oil and will revisit it again a bit later. The keyway in the steering gear suggest to me it will slide off toward the right, in the direction of the shorter section of the cross shaft, but the parts diagrams suggest the steering gear goes the other way. I'll have to see if I can find where someone else, perhaps 29 Chev, has documented disassembly of these.

 

IMG_20170703_152752.jpg

IMG_20170703_152813.jpg

 

The end of the cross shaft nearest to the clutch pedal has some wear and the sleeve bearing (1185558) has suffered significant wear and needs to be replaced. Also the sleeve bearing (1185582*) inside the clutch pedal is severely worn, more than the other.

 

IMG_20170703_152820.jpg

IMG_20170703_174427.jpg

 

I am contemplating how I want to go about fixing the shaft itself, it's diameter appears to be around 0.630", but in the worn area it's down to 0.617".

 

 

1185582* - This may not be the correct part #, the scan of the parts list I am using has a smudge over this number.


Edited by dtsh, July 03, 2017 - 05:53 PM.

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#40 29 Chev ONLINE  

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Posted July 03, 2017 - 06:07 PM

Here is a link as to how I removed mine off of my 1053 - http://gardentractor...-project/page-6 .  If it is the same as mine it has probably never been disassembled since it left the factory.  Hope this helps.


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#41 dtsh ONLINE  

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Posted July 03, 2017 - 09:37 PM

Here is a link as to how I removed mine off of my 1053 - http://gardentractor...-project/page-6 .  If it is the same as mine it has probably never been disassembled since it left the factory.  Hope this helps.

 

Thank you.

I looked over that thread earlier, but I was distracted putting up hay and must have missed it.

Do you recall which side of the shaft you pressed it out from? I mean if you pressed the shorter side through the arm/gear or the longer? I presume the shorter.


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#42 29 Chev ONLINE  

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Posted July 04, 2017 - 07:17 AM

I believe I pressed the shorter end of the shaft through the two pieces - once I removed the bushing on the clutch side and got the shaft out of the mounting plate assembly I wire brushed the shaft to remove any paint and debris.  There was no key or keyway in the shaft on my 1053 but the combination of the steering gear and arm that are probably seized on the shaft result in about a 5" width of cast that is probably happily married to the shaft.  If memory serves me correctly I had to mount the shaft with the gear and arm in the press and apply pressure to it and then it took about 15 minutes of heating the two pieces with the MAP gas torch lengthwise where they went around the shaft to get them to start to move - my press is small and only has a 2 ton jack so I moved things outside before I started to heat things up - make sure you wear safety glasses and gloves as well as a shop apron if you use this method - SAFETY FIRST.  I have two 1050's and one came apart no problem and the other one still is seized to the shaft as I never got the shaft to move on it.  The gear and arm really don't have to turn on the shaft as the shaft can turn in the bushings and things can still function.  You could build the shaft up a little bit with a MIG welder where it is worn and then use a sander or file to dress the shaft down back to the correct O.D. Hope this helps and it moves for you.


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#43 dtsh ONLINE  

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Posted July 05, 2017 - 11:44 AM

Thanks for the guidance, 29 Chev.

 

I didn't do any work yesterday, due to travelling to see family; 9+ hours in a car seems so much longer than it did 20 years ago, I'm paying for it today. I did manage to make a side-stop along the way to to look at some Bolens tractors a friend has. The two he's looking to re-home are 650s, one rough and the other fair. I'll probably get the rough one for a parts machine, but I don't have the room for another whole tractor (the parts machine I'll break down). The hydro pedal on my H16 is nice, but I lust after his G14's every time I see them.

 

With 29 Chev's encouragement, I got back to the steering gear/arm on the cross shaft. I stared with the smoke wrench and soon the steering gear separated pretty easily and it rode farther up the shaft and out of my way, but the steering arm was on there very tight. Eventually, with the right combination of heating, beating, and alternating application of penetrating oil and profanity it finally relented and popped off the shaft. I had mushroomed the arm slightly, but was able to hammer it back into shape.

 

IMG_20170705_110847.jpg

 

 

I've a lot of other tasks for today, so we'll see if I can get some of my other projects worked on enough to be able to get back to the tractor before my day off ends.


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#44 29 Chev ONLINE  

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Posted July 05, 2017 - 02:59 PM

Glad you got them off - looks like the teeth on the steering gear are in good shape. 


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#45 dtsh ONLINE  

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Posted July 11, 2017 - 12:01 PM

It's been a few days since I've gotten to do any work on the 750, but several shafts have significant wear at the point of contact with various bushings. The cross shaft is probably the most worn and it's not terrible, but I figure it's easier to fix now than later and the repaired surface will cause less wear in the long run.

 

On the cross shaft specifically, the wear is around the last few inches of shaft where the shaft enters the bronze bearing for the support and where it penetrates the clutch pedal bearing. I know welding on shafts is typically discouraged, but I'm tempted to weld it up and turn it back down instead of going the recommended route of JB Weld/Loctite Fixmaster/etc.

 

I already have the epoxy, mig welder, lathe, and enough skill to *probably* not screw it up either way, but some advice, either pro or con either way would be appreciated.

 

If epoxy, any advice on brand? I've worked with epoxies many times, but I've never used them in this manner.

 

I think my major hangup is I just don't feel like epoxy will wear like steel.


Edited by dtsh, July 11, 2017 - 12:05 PM.

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