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22" Tiller (18610) Not Recommended on 1220 (193-01)?


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#1 TGaffney OFFLINE  

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Posted July 30, 2016 - 07:00 AM

I just bought a Bolens 1220 model 193-01 that came with a 22" tiller model 18610.  This is a round back tiller that from my research was produced in the early/mid 1960's.  On the attachment interchangeability chart I have it indicates this is a "Not Recommended" combination.  The seller said he used them together. 

 

Can anyone provide input as to why this is a "Not Recommended" combination?  

 

Thanks 

 


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#2 Bruce Dorsi OFFLINE  

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Posted July 30, 2016 - 07:45 AM

It is OK to use the 18610 tiller behind the 1220.  ....Some of those 18610's also used an 8" tine extension kit to bring the width to 30".

 

As the horsepower of the tractors increased, Bolens came out with the 25" # 18614 tiller which was considered a heavier-duty tiller.  ....An 8" tine extension kit could also be used with the 18614 to bring the width to 33".

 

The #18610 tillers were approved for 6hp to 10 hp tractor models because they were the only tillers available at that time (1962 to 1967 or 1968). 

 

With the introduction of the heavier-duty 25" tillers in 1967 or 1968, they were recommended for 8hp and larger tractor models.


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#3 TGaffney OFFLINE  

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Posted July 30, 2016 - 11:07 AM

Thank you for the information Bruce - I appreciate it.  I read on this site that these tillers are not recommended for Virgin ground as they were less beefy - do you have any idea as to whether or not that is an accurate assessment?  I have a 1225 with the wider/heavier tiller that I keep at another property, so I could always transport and use that if necessary. 


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#4 secondtry OFFLINE  

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Posted July 30, 2016 - 11:45 AM

   I can't resist butting in, I decided years ago that breaking ground with any tiller is not good. It is so easy to get or fabricate a ripper tooth to make a few passes and loosen the soil first then till. I have seen very nice heavy duty tillers destroyed breaking ground. Don


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#5 chieffan OFFLINE  

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Posted July 30, 2016 - 12:57 PM

secondtry is dead on.  Plow the ground first, then till it.  Tillers were not made to bust new ground.  Ripper tooth will leave a lot of virgin ground for the tiller to break up, or will break the tiller up.


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#6 Bolens 1000 OFFLINE  

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Posted July 30, 2016 - 03:46 PM

The older tillers with the round tine hoods especially are not designed for virgin soil as they had a brass bull gear that would be susceptible to wear and tear.

 

They came out with the heavy duty tillers (Square tine hood) which were chain driven on the tine shaft and meant for a little more abuse.

 

A service bulletin was sent out describing this, I think its in the manuals section


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#7 Bruce Dorsi OFFLINE  

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Posted July 30, 2016 - 03:46 PM

 

.  I read on this site that these tillers are not recommended for Virgin ground as they were less beefy - do you have any idea as to whether or not that is an accurate assessment?  I have a 1225 with the wider/heavier tiller that I keep at another property, so I could always transport and use that if necessary. 

 

The Bolens tillers can be used to break virgin ground, but it is best done in several passes, lowering the tiller a little after each pass.

 

It can be done, but as others have said, if the ground is broken first, it will be much easier on the tiller.


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#8 JBRamsey ONLINE  

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Posted July 30, 2016 - 07:13 PM

I agree with not breaking new ground with a tiller. I've done it. It's not fun and you really don't get that good a ground out of it.

Are you breaking ground for a garden or a yard? If you are wanting it for a garden, I would do it in a few steps. First, I'd turn it over and disc it in late summer early fall. If you want to kill even more weeds, I would turn it over and disc it now. Let the new weeds germinate and disc it again before those weeds go to seed. I would do this until it's time to plant a cover crop on your area. Then I'd plant winter wheat or rye heavy and walk away until next spring. The rye will add organic matter and nitrogen to your soil next spring when you turn it over and disc for your garden.

If you are breaking ground for a lawn, I'd do the same plow, disc, disc, disc routine until time to seed with grass this fall. In between discing and rains, I collect the rocks that show up.

I've done this for both a new yard and a new garden and it works. You stop a lot of weeds and have easier ground to work when you are ready to seed.
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#9 TGaffney OFFLINE  

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Posted July 31, 2016 - 02:42 PM

Thanks for the advice everyone.  I don't have any of the other suggested attachments for initially breaking ground buy I will look into them. 

 

I tilled about 3000 sq feet for a new lawn last year with my 1225 with the larger tiller and it worked great - the tractor and tiller never seemed to be laboring at all.  I did make several passes going a bit deeper each time.


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#10 TGaffney OFFLINE  

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Posted August 14, 2016 - 10:05 PM

Just posting an update - I purchased a 60" box blade with 5 rippers to run over the ground first.  The property I am working on is in Southern Vermont and it has ledge and a lot of rocks - hence all the rock walls there.  I took many passes with the box blade in low gear and set the rippers progressively deeper.  I pulled out a lot of boulders and flat rock which I moved off to the side.  I also purchase a 3 pt furrow / middle buster which I plan to use next.  Once I feel the rocks are mostly gone I will use the tiller to mix in fertilzer and lime which I need to amend the soil with.  I then will use my post hole digger to make holes.  I am working on an apple orchard which will contain about 50 semi dwarf trees that I started from grafts.  Long term project but I have found they pay off one way or another in the end!


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