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Sawdust's Garden looking Good


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#1 Sawdust OFFLINE  

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Posted July 08, 2016 - 07:11 PM

Just a little info this is our first year gardening here at our new place. I could only plow & disc one time late fall last year. I plowed again & disc several times this spring before planting.We have a lot of clay. We have brought in about 14,000 lb's of top soil as we needed it one scoop at a time on my trailer. We used this to make deep beds for everything to give the plants something to start in. This fall I want to add some cow manure, some sand & a cover crop. Next year I should have a good amount of compost aged enough to use as we plant.

My wife prefers the only gear drive GT I have. She picks a gear then hauls the mail....she says Hydros are too complicated.

Garden5.jpg Garden10.jpg Garden7.jpg

 

My 1954 Seed Planter. She can be expensive but well worth it.

Garden9.jpg

 

Well after a very slow start because of getting the seedlings started late this year we're seeing some progress. I can't believe after all this time of plants looking like they were just sitting there now everything is doing so well.  I don't normally stake tomatoes I usually put up posts about 6ft apart & run strings across about 6-8" apart & tie the plants to that.  My wife wanted to stake them this year. I got some 1x6 poplar & ripped enough for the tomatoes & teepees for the pole beans. Our pepper plants were so tiny when we put them out you couldn't hardly see them. It seems like none of the seeds we started done very well. We have always started our own seeds but maybe not next year....it was expensive & a lot of trouble. Our corn took a shot from the hard rain today but we kind of straightened it back up but it will survive. We have squash & zucchini in between one corn row.We had some problems with rabbits eating the beets. I put a radio in the middle of the garden like GL Grumpy suggested & this seems to be working well. I did have three that liked the radio but their eating heavenly beets now....BANG!  We only have one little guy that comes around but hasn't got in the garden so far. I plan on planting another crop of beets for fall harvest. Tomatoes vary from eating to sauce making kind, bush beans, hilled cucumbers for eating, pickling cucumbers on the fence for canned pickles, bell, banana, & jalapeno peppers, okra, beets, green onions, potatoes, & some flowers in various areas for controlling certain bugs. Still to plant are some more beets, cabbage, red onions, pumpkins & gourds for fall harvest, some various heirloom beans that were handed down from my wife's grand parents....these can be an interesting topic. I might start another thread on that to see what others have had.

 

Garden3.jpg Garden4.jpg

 

Picked a few new potatoes & last years canned green beans....very good!

 

Garden2.jpg Garden1.jpg

 

Our garden is 24x50 & has the sun coming up along the far long side & sets of coarse on the other long side...full day of sun. I noticed the corn at the south end is like stair steps in growth going north. I'm thinking of staggering the planting next year to prevent shading on one end. We might enlarge a little next year. I don't mind giving stuff away but I don't want to put out way too much. Once the plowing, disking & tilling is done we do everything else by hand. Next year I would like to fence it to keep the critters out. So far the deer just stroll by outside the white fence. I did have to shoo a few fawns out of one end before they got a taste. I may have to take Chiefans advice on the hot fence if I see any coons. Thanks for looking & Happy Gardening!

 

 


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#2 jms180 OFFLINE  

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Posted July 08, 2016 - 08:25 PM

those red taters sure look good. thanks for the pictures that sure is a nice garden


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#3 ducky ONLINE  

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Posted July 08, 2016 - 09:22 PM

Nothing better than fresh red taters and butter. Oh did I mention butter.

 

We are very familiar with red clay up here in the Fox Valley area of Wisconsin.  It needs to be plowed or deep tilled in the fall and just worked with a cultivator in the spring when dry enough.  Working deep or when wet in the spring brings up wetter soil that bake like a clay pot in the sun.  Very hard to work with the rest of the year.

Plant some annual rye or other annual cover crop after the crop is off and don't be scared to give it some nitrogen.  Urea 46-0-0 is fine. 100Lbs per acre. The rye will put roots down to near 40" and store all the nutrient it take up for your next years crop.  Working the top 4" of soil in the spring will control 90% of the rye plants but you may get a bit of seed that did not sprout the year before come in but in can be handled.  

You are right about getting some manure on there as well.  10 ton per acre is a good start and put it on and work it in before planting the rye grass.  Then the rye grass can use this manure and turn it into nutrients for next years crop.  Mixing sand in is OK but it would take so much that it would not be economical.  A cover crop will do so much more for you.

There are a lot of other cover crops you can use.  Oat and buckwheat, and then there are clovers and other legumes that fix nitrogen in the soil so you do not have to buy so much.  A mix of a grass and a legume compliment each other as the grass can use the N that the legume as producing.  It does not hurt to apply some nitrogen to this planting as well to help the grass till the legume gets going.


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#4 Sawdust OFFLINE  

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Posted July 08, 2016 - 09:55 PM

Nothing better than fresh red taters and butter. Oh did I mention butter.

We are very familiar with red clay up here in the Fox Valley area of Wisconsin. It needs to be plowed or deep tilled in the fall and just worked with a cultivator in the spring when dry enough. Working deep or when wet in the spring brings up wetter soil that bake like a clay pot in the sun. Very hard to work with the rest of the year.
Plant some annual rye or other annual cover crop after the crop is off and don't be scared to give it some nitrogen. Urea 46-0-0 is fine. 100Lbs per acre. The rye will put roots down to near 40" and store all the nutrient it take up for your next years crop. Working the top 4" of soil in the spring will control 90% of the rye plants but you may get a bit of seed that did not sprout the year before come in but in can be handled.
You are right about getting some manure on there as well. 10 ton per acre is a good start and put it on and work it in before planting the rye grass. Then the rye grass can use this manure and turn it into nutrients for next years crop. Mixing sand in is OK but it would take so much that it would not be economical. A cover crop will do so much more for you.
There are a lot of other cover crops you can use. Oat and buckwheat, and then there are clovers and other legumes that fix nitrogen in the soil so you do not have to buy so much. A mix of a grass and a legume compliment each other as the grass can use the N that the legume as producing. It does not hurt to apply some nitrogen to this planting as well to help the grass till the legume gets going.


A lot of good info Ducky sounds like a good plan....thanks very much.

#5 HANKG ONLINE  

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Posted July 09, 2016 - 06:58 AM

Looks great, I may double my size next year I enjoy growing my own produce and the neighbors can't believe the success I have with it .


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#6 shorty ONLINE  

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Posted July 09, 2016 - 07:11 AM

Looks good Sawdust. I used grass clippings and leaves for organic material in our garden. Not a quick way though, probably took 8 years to get to where I wanted it.
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#7 Sawdust OFFLINE  

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Posted July 09, 2016 - 11:02 AM

Looks good Sawdust. I used grass clippings and leaves for organic material in our garden. Not a quick way though, probably took 8 years to get to where I wanted it.


I did that at our old place & put some in the compost bins. I don't have a bagger for anything right now. The mulching blades chop it so fine I can't rake it either. I was thinking about rigging up a bagger for the push mower just to get a few loads for tge garden.
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#8 Cvans ONLINE  

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Posted July 09, 2016 - 04:08 PM

Nice looking garden and you can tell your wife that I too prefer a GT with a standard transmission for turning dirt in the garden. Much easier to maintain a constant speed especially when tilling. :D 

Give me a foot controlled hydro for everything else.  :thumbs:


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#9 shorty ONLINE  

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Posted July 09, 2016 - 04:48 PM

I have been keeping my Husqvarna LT just for picking up clippings. It mows a good bit slower than the Gravely. I am kicking around the idea of getting a lawn sweeper for doing the pickup. And then get rid of the little LT.
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