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Case 446 (new owner with few questions)


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#1 tom tractor OFFLINE  

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Posted July 07, 2016 - 08:18 PM

I am the new owner of a Case 446. A few questions? My 446 says to use regular grade gas - NOT premium grade gas. It that for gas sold in 1984 or now.

SHOULD I USE REGULAR OR HIGH TEST?

What does a rear Hydrolic PTO sell for? How much is it worth?

Is the carb on the 16 hp, b43m the same as the b43g, 18hp Onan?

Thank you in advance!

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Edited by tom tractor, July 07, 2016 - 08:19 PM.

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#2 Oldford OFFLINE  

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Posted July 07, 2016 - 09:07 PM

I use mid-grade.  I have heard that low test is often thinned out with junk, and hi test could make the engine run hot.  I'm no gas expert but i haven't had any engine trouble in the last 10 or so years. most of my tractors have been older than yours but no onans. also marine stabil and mmo for small engines just my .02.

 

The rear pto usually sells for around 150 here in maine.  a guy has been trying to sell one for 200 for a couple years now.  That would include the 2 hard lines, which are for a "long frame" if anybody asks.

 

That white seat might be worth something if it has no rips.  a ripped one sold on ebay for 20 bucks a while back but if no rips a collector would pay more.  one year only on the black frame tractor.  implements were also white if you are into the collector thing.

 

usually carbs get bigger as horsepower increases but i have no idea on yours.  i'm sure somebody else does tho.  nice lookin tractor btw


Edited by Oldford, July 07, 2016 - 09:16 PM.

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#3 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted July 08, 2016 - 01:10 AM

Regular from a good gas station with Marvel Mystery Oil added. Good Luck, Rick



#4 tom tractor OFFLINE  

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Posted July 08, 2016 - 04:51 AM

I currently have 1/2 the tank filled with high test mixed with sea foam to clean the system. Could I fill the rest of the tank with low test.

#5 John Arsenault OFFLINE  

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Posted July 08, 2016 - 05:56 AM

There is a misconception that Hi octane burns hotter then low octane, as weird as it may sound its the opposite. A higher octane burns cooler. The reason it would say use 87 octane is that when they made the engine it preforms on the minimum gas grade requirement. Most hi performance 2-strokes require 93 octane or better and if you try to run anything cheaper you end up burning up piston and rings do to excessive heat and will even hear engine knock or rattle know under load. 

 

 

The problem with todays gas is ethanol , ethanol really does a mess to our fuel systems. This chemical is the blame for that white haze crap we get in out float bowls and jets. It also dries out your rubber parts. Most carb related problems are from ethanol. (ethanol is a whole other subject), but anyway MMO or marvels is great for helping to aid that keeps the build up from sticking and coats your rubbers and metals (protects then from the ethanol.  

 

SeaFoam is another great product to This is more of a go to for helping to get rid of the mess ethanol left behind , I think a little in your gas may also be a preventative much like the mmo but its classified as a solvent and MMO is only about 30% solvent. 

 

BTW leave the hi test in...I assure you that Hi octane will NOT cause you to over heat. 


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#6 newcaseowner OFFLINE  

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Posted July 12, 2016 - 10:26 PM

i think this might clear things up a little.

 

http://www.fuelecono...eg/octane.shtml

Selecting the Right Octane Fuel What is octane rating?

octane.jpg

Octane rating is the measure of a fuel's ability to resist "knocking" or "pinging" during combustion, caused by the air/fuel mixture detonating prematurely in the engine.

In the U.S., unleaded gasoline typically has octane ratings of 87 (regular), 88–90 (midgrade), and 91–94 (premium). Gasoline with an octane rating of 85 is available in some high-elevation areas of the U.S. (more about that below).

The octane rating is prominently displayed in large black numbers on a yellow background on gasoline pumps.

What octane fuel should I use in my vehicle?

You should use the octane rating required for your vehicle by the manufacturer. So, check your owner's manual. Most gasoline vehicles are designed to run on 87 octane, but others are designed to use higher octane fuel.

Why do some manufacturers require or recommend the use of higher octane gasoline?

Higher octane fuels are often required or recommended for engines that use a higher compression ratio and/or use supercharging or turbocharging to force more air into the engine. Increasing pressure in the cylinder allows an engine to extract more mechanical energy from a given air/fuel mixture but requires higher octane fuel to keep the mixture from pre-detonating. In these engines, high octane fuel will improve performance and fuel economy.

What if I use a lower octane fuel than required for my vehicle?

Using a lower octane fuel than required can cause the engine to run poorly and can damage the engine and emissions control system over time. It may also void your warranty. In older vehicles, the engine can make an audible "knocking" or "pinging" sound. Many newer vehicles can adjust the spark timing to reduce knock, but engine power and fuel economy will still suffer.

Will using a higher octane fuel than required improve fuel economy or performance?

It depends. For most vehicles, higher octane fuel may improve performance and gas mileage and reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions by a few percent during severe duty operation, such as towing a trailer or carrying heavy loads, especially in hot weather. However, under normal driving conditions, you may get little to no benefit.

Why does higher octane fuel cost more?

The fuel components that boost octane are generally more expensive to produce.

Is higher octane fuel worth the extra cost?

If your vehicle requires midgrade or premium fuel, absolutely. If your owner's manual says your vehicle doesn't require premium but says that your vehicle will run better on higher octane fuel, it's really up to you. The cost increase is typically higher than the fuel savings. However, lowering CO2 emissions and decreasing petroleum usage by even a small amount may be more important than cost to some consumers.

What is 85 octane, and is it safe to use in my vehicle?

The sale of 85 octane fuel was originally allowed in high-elevation regions—where the barometric pressure is lower—because it was cheaper and because most carbureted engines tolerated it fairly well. This is not true for modern gasoline engines. So, unless you have an older vehicle with a carbureted engine, you should use the manufacturer-recommended fuel for your vehicle, even where 85 octane fuel is available.

Can ethanol boost gasoline's octane rating?

Yes. Ethanol has a much higher octane rating (about 109) than gasoline. Refiners usually blend ethanol with gasoline to help boost its octane rating—most gasoline in the U.S. contains up to 10% ethanol. Blends of up to 15% ethanol are available in some areas, and several manufacturers approve using this blend in recent-model vehicles.

 

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with the fact that kohler engines are of the low compression type in the neighborhood of 5:1 to 8:1 if i remember right that means regular gas is ok in them.

 

when i lived in oroville CA. a friend and i would ride our motorcycles from oroville CA to the town of Cherokee CA. in the summer.

it would be upwards of 110 at times and our air cooled engines would ping bad going up the mountain..

 

we tried 110 octane av gas from the airport the next time up the mountain and not one ping or knock from our engines at all.

our engines did not run any hotter on 110 av gas than they did on regular just the ping went away.


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#7 indy2door OFFLINE  

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Posted July 23, 2016 - 03:02 AM

[quote name="John Arsenault" post="695382" timestamp="1467975367"]There is a misconception that Hi octane burns hotter then low octane, as weird as it may sound its the opposite. A higher octane burns cooler. The reason it would say use 87 octane is that when they made the engine it preforms on the minimum gas grade requirement. Most hi performance 2-strokes require 93 octane or better and if you try to run anything cheaper you end up burning up piston and rings do to excessive heat and will even hear engine knock or rattle know under load. 
 
 
The problem with todays gas is ethanol , ethanol really does a mess to our fuel systems. This chemical is the blame for that white haze crap we get in out float bowls and jets. It also dries out your rubber parts. Most carb related problems are from ethanol. (ethanol is a whole other subject), but anyway MMO or marvels is great for helping to aid that keeps the build up from sticking and coats your rubbers and metals (protects then from the ethanol.  
 
SeaFoam is another great product to This is more of a go to for helping to get rid of the mess ethanol left behind , I think a little in your gas may also be a preventative much like the mmo but its classified as a solvent and MMO is only about 30% solvent. 
 
BTW leave the hi test in...I assure you that Hi octane will NOT cause you to over heat.
[/quot

I have been using e10 in everything from small engines (Kohlers, Onans, Generacs & B&S), chain saws, generators, cars, trucks, tractors and even an old Ford gasoline powered semi tractor with no problems what so ever. I find most who complain about ethanol have no idea what they're talking about.
As far as Seafoam, MMO or any of the other snake oils, just a waste of money.
Just my 2 cents worth.

#8 John Arsenault OFFLINE  

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Posted July 23, 2016 - 07:31 AM

I have been using e10 in everything from small engines (Kohlers, Onans, Generacs & B&S), chain saws, generators, cars, trucks, tractors and even an old Ford gasoline powered semi tractor with no problems what so ever. I find most who complain about ethanol have no idea what they're talking about.
As far as Seafoam, MMO or any of the other snake oils, just a waste of money.
Just my 2 cents worth.

 

Thanks for your 2 cents here is your change. First off I thank you for coming in and taking part in this conversation, however I don't see a single fact from your statement to back anything that you have said. I am going to consider my self one of the"most" that does not know what he is talking about. So with a nice clean open mind lets just state some FACTS.

 

Ethanol is alcohol....Fact

Alcohols are water soluble and can attract and absorb water....Fact

Alcohol is a drying agent....Fact

Alcohol burns hotter creating more heat to the engine ....Fact

Many engine manufactures advise not using fuel with ethanol in it do to engine damage (this is from them not me) ...Fact

 

 

I agree with one thing you said and that is MMO is a waste of money...and if they stop putting ethanol in our fuel I can then stop wasting my money.

 

For those that are reading along ...Yes MMO is just a basic oil with a little additive in it, there is not rocket science behind it and its not really a mystery, but ethanol is alcohol and it will dry our your rubber, but even worse the oily film left behind in your cylinder walls/valves etc. from normal engine operation gets deteriorated by ethanol , the MMO is a great additive because it helps with the loss of those vital oils but adding its own in the fuel mixture. 

 

I know there are a few more things that I have not touched yet on this topic .....Coming to mind separation and shelf life. But I am going to assume no one ever has to store their fuel for longer then a few weeks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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#9 Delmar OFFLINE  

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Posted July 23, 2016 - 07:52 AM

MMO is just kerosene, and kerosene is oil-based.    Adding a little to your gas or oil in a motor doesn't hurt anything.  it actually it helps to clean out sludge in older motors.   my father-in-law used to buy and sell old cars for extra money.  he would drain the oil in the motor on a car he'd bought, fill it back up with kerosene, then run the motor for a few minutes.  He said not to let the motor get hot, just run it a few minutes with the kerosene in place of the motor oil.  this would clean a bunch of sludge out of the motor, especially in the valve covers and it will also help clean out the sludge in the screen in the oil pick up tube in the oil pan. 


Edited by Delmar, July 23, 2016 - 07:54 AM.





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