Jump to content

Nominations for Tractor of the Month
Garden Tractors and Parts on eBay



Photo
- - - - -

septic piping question...


  • Please log in to reply
19 replies to this topic

#16 dodge trucker OFFLINE  

dodge trucker
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 19314
  • 1,439 Thanks
  • 1,896 posts
  • Location: kankakee

Posted June 27, 2016 - 06:01 AM

No, I know that no grease goes into the drains. Not cooking grease anyways. Being an auto mechanic and having done industrial maintenance over the years, and my son just getting started in the same kind of work the last few years, we both have taken some pretty dirty showers... that would be the only grease that might have gone thru the system over the years. well, that and what ever goes thru the laundry from time to time.

 

The other line goes into the same tank (I was told it is 500 gallon by the pumper guy) and I have never had a problem there so I thought the field could be eliminated as a problem; even though the other side handles less volume, it does handle part of the house... if the field were bad, I would think that any added from anywhere within  the system would add to the problem.

The pumper guy has always said "everything looks fine" with my system, most recently 18 months ago. I have dug the cap up each time it has been done to save $$$ vs having him do that. next time I will dig up the other end and try to find  the other cover , I assume there is another on the opposite end but have never dug that end up.

 

They say that when our houses were built, they only put in a 35' drain line.

I know the guy next door has problems with his though I think the idiot put his pool right over part of the tank....  the weight of the pool over the tank can't be good, that would be like driving over it....  last year he was having his pumped about every couple of months... I have not noticed the septic truck there in a while, though I know he has not had a new system put in....

but they have 5 in their house, I have 3.

we have a very high water table in this area and when we have a really heavy rainy period, the back yard smells like sewer gas til the ground is able to dry up. and I have had other neighbors tell me they have the same thing.

I remember when I was a kid, my Dad rented a backhoe and dug 6 trenches next to each other and extended the lines, I forget which they said we only had 1 or 2 lines beyond the tank, then when I was a teen the village came in there and put in city water and sewers.  I am on city water and my own septic.  I live 30 miles and a whole county away from where I grew up.

I was hoping that "worst case" all I would have to eventually do would be to extend my line a ways and not redo the whole system.... in the 18 years of living here 2-3 neighbors have had that done, they go to some kind of "lift station" setup.


Edited by dodge trucker, June 27, 2016 - 06:02 AM.


#17 boyscout862 ONLINE  

boyscout862
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 8923
  • 9,769 Thanks
  • 7,536 posts
  • Location: N.E. Connecticut

Posted June 27, 2016 - 09:36 AM

Don't over think it nor get worried.  Take it one step at a time.  Fix the pipes and uncover the top of the tank. If you have any distribution boxes(in the field) uncover and inspect them. Do an overall assesment of the system and then decide if anything needs to be done.

 

Our health codes do not allow extending trenches anymore. Adding new trenches is allowed and is the better idea. Leaching field work justifies getting your own tractor/loader/backhoe. Check your codes.

 

When you assess your system, check the slopes of the pipes and tank. Check the elevations of the house outlet, tank inlet, tank outlet, and any distribution boxes. There is a possibility that something settled and reduces flow. Good Luck, Rick


  • Coventry Plumber said thank you

#18 Phluphy OFFLINE  

Phluphy
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 70148
  • 308 Thanks
  • 401 posts
  • Location: Central Gulf Coast Florida

Posted June 27, 2016 - 12:01 PM

Tanks need to be pumped but it depends on how much solids are in your waste. The septic tank does three things: it acts as a sediment bowl to catch heavy things, it acts as a digestor for solids to break down, and it is a grease trap. The grease is the worst because I've seen it over flow the baffle and then plug up the field. Once that happens you need to do a new field. Health codes vary so the remedy varies. I have usually just put in a whole new field. Pumping is cheap insurance. Not pouring grease down the drain is important too.

 

On modern septic tanks there are three covers to open: inlet, center, and outlet. A good pumper will open all and clean them too. My guy has me fill the bath tub and when he has gotten to the bottom of the tank, we turn on all faucets and drain the tub. This flushes out the pipes and lets him clean the bottom better.

 

Those products that are supposed to help your septic tank, clean the tank but, put the crap in the leaching field where it plugs it up. The last leaching field that I did was $30,000. She was a friend and I was able to save her $10,000+. She had been quoted $40,000 by another guy.  It had only taken her husband 6 years to ruin the system by dumping bacon grease down the sink. He was from a city and refused to believe that it was a bad thing to pour grease down the drain. Good Luck, Rick

Grease and bleach via the washing machine. And, antibacterial soaps/dish detergents...possibly the most common but, not considered, hazards to the function of septic tanks. Septic tanks are not intended to be receptacles for garbage disposals etc. The only things they should be subjected to are human biological waste and grey water from bathing, hand washing etc. Numerous instances have been witnessed where people believed kitty litter was acceptable...NOT. Especially the "clumping" varieties.  Properly treated and used, the only thing that should go from the tank to the leach field is grey water.

Albeit several people believe bacon grease, cooking oils, shortenings are harmless to septic systems...I've also witnessed how a restaurant thought it would be harmless to a city's sewage system when they drained a 50 gallon fryer into their sewer. Wrong! Disrupted the system for nearly a week.   


  • boyscout862 and Coventry Plumber have said thanks

#19 dodge trucker OFFLINE  

dodge trucker
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 19314
  • 1,439 Thanks
  • 1,896 posts
  • Location: kankakee

Posted June 27, 2016 - 12:41 PM

bleach bad for it? I wouldn't have thought of that one. Idk where the outlet line connects to the tank or which direction it goes. The grass has definitely been greener directly over the outlet line from the house that I am currently working on this year compared to past years even though I have had my wife using the laundromat for a good 6 months now. My son did the 1st load of laundry at home yesterday in a out that long.
  • Phluphy said thank you

#20 Phluphy OFFLINE  

Phluphy
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 70148
  • 308 Thanks
  • 401 posts
  • Location: Central Gulf Coast Florida

Posted June 27, 2016 - 08:33 PM

bleach bad for it? I wouldn't have thought of that one. Idk where the outlet line connects to the tank or which direction it goes. The grass has definitely been greener directly over the outlet line from the house that I am currently working on this year compared to past years even though I have had my wife using the laundromat for a good 6 months now. My son did the 1st load of laundry at home yesterday in a out that long.

Bleach is one of the deadliest killers of a septic system, a system which uses bacterial action to do what a septic tank does and bleach, which can also be used to treat a swimming pool to do just that...kill the bacteria, has a field day in a septic tank, all the way into a leach bed. 

After explaining it to the better half, more times than can be recalled and several boxes of Ridex everything is finally back in order.

No bleach, grease, cooking oil etc. Sure it'll continue working, until the bleach has finally killed the anaerobic bacteria.  Which is why septic tanks are dark, relatively air tight boxes. The bacteria does not like oxygen. Bleach introduces oxygen to the water.


  • dodge trucker said thank you




Top