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Fuel Tank Problems on Sears GT18-6

sears gt18 gt18-6 fuel tank

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#1 Utah Smitty OFFLINE  

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Posted June 25, 2016 - 11:49 PM

I revisited my mom's Sears GT16-6 today--I had upgraded the carb float to brass a couple years ago--it ran fine for 1-2 hours at my shop, and for a couple days at mom's, then started acting fuel starved and finally wouldn't start.

 

Having already worked on it several times in the past, I threw in the towel and let mom borrow my Sears GT-18... well, it finally died as well.

 

So, I had acquired an Onan P218 ?? and decided to swap out the factory engine in mom's tractor with the newer Onan.

 

Started to take the engine out--removed mounting bolts, disconnected throttle, choke and coil wires, removed belts, and started taking the tank off as I planned to install new fuel line from the tank to the carb.  I had installed new line when I had the tractor the last time, but I thought there may be some problem I wasn't aware of.

 

When I finally got the tank up and out from under the seat suspension spring, the hose tore at the tank nipple... it was also kinked over to where it looked like it wasn't passing much fuel...

 

So, I hooked up the tank above the dash, put a little oil in the spark plug holes, changed the oil, and spun it without plugs to make sure there was adequate lube everywhere... When I put the plugs in, she fired up and kept running!!

 

That makes me think the fuel line originally was slightly kinked, but still allowed fuel to pass, but after it been working a little, the hose softened and bent even more--finally shutting off the fuel flow.

 

So, long story short... Is there any trick to hooking up the fuel line to the plastic tank, and not pinching it off?  The fuel line has to do a 90 degree bend to the front, and I don't want to kink it shut again... Let me know how you all have handled this in the past.

 

Thanks,

 

 

Smitty



#2 dodge trucker OFFLINE  

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Posted June 26, 2016 - 12:10 AM

can you run a piece of 1/4" steel brake line, bend that "close" to where it needs to go, and then only have to have a straight short nipple of hose at each end to connect to the tank and to the carb? I hate running rubber hose the length of a tractor for fear of deterioration and of getting caught up in some linkage somewhere....


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#3 secondtry ONLINE  

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Posted June 26, 2016 - 12:59 AM

I just replaced the fuel line on my new to me 18 6 with no problems. 1/4 in cord reinforced rubber line. On my tractor there was no reason to bend the line nearly hard enough to kink it. What is in the way to cause the tight bend    Don



#4 MH81 OFFLINE  

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Posted June 26, 2016 - 06:17 AM

Where the bend will be, you can slide a spring over it?
I haven't had that issue on any of mine, just make sure it isn't short and tie it up in several places

#5 chieffan OFFLINE  

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Posted June 26, 2016 - 07:26 AM

Copper is harder to work with and more expensive but that is all that was used years ago and still works today.  Just have to have a loop in the line some place if it is a longer run to take the vibration and have some give for removal.  Problem is most filters and tank connections now days are set up for a rubber fuel line.  Make sure you get fuel line and not a vacuum line.


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#6 Tecumseh power ONLINE  

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Posted June 26, 2016 - 07:35 AM

Run the new fuel line let about 3" stick out of the hole where the tank nipple goes. The fuel line should be above the brake rod. It won't kink if you run it like that. Maybe the other one was pulled too tight or had too much slack and was kicking pressing against the brake rod. I run mine that way in my gt18 with no problems
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#7 dodge trucker OFFLINE  

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Posted June 26, 2016 - 07:59 AM

Copper is harder to work with and more expensive but that is all that was used years ago and still works today.  Just have to have a loop in the line some place if it is a longer run to take the vibration and have some give for removal.  Problem is most filters and tank connections now days are set up for a rubber fuel line.  Make sure you get fuel line and not a vacuum line.

you can put short pieces of rubber line and clamps on each end of the steel or copper line. the less rubber line in the system, the less chance for problems.


Edited by dodge trucker, June 26, 2016 - 11:57 AM.

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#8 glgrumpy OFFLINE  

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Posted June 26, 2016 - 08:08 AM

Don't know situation for brand, but why not a brass elbow with barbs both directions at a hard bend part?  A new path for the hose?


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#9 Utah Smitty OFFLINE  

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Posted June 26, 2016 - 10:18 AM

can you run a piece of 1/4" steel brake line, bend that "close" to where it needs to go, and then only have to have a straight short nipple of hose at each end to connect to the tank and to the carb? I hate running rubber hose the length of a tractor for fear of deterioration and of getting caught up in some linkage somewhere....

That's probably a good idea.  When I put new hose in this a couple years ago it got rubbed through and I had to put a short length of tubing in it to splice it...

 

The biggest challenge is putting the tank in and connecting the tubing.  There is a 1 1/2" diameter hole for the hose to go through in the top of the frame... not a problem in itself, but 1" below the hole is a piece of steel running parallel to the sides of the frame, with about a 3/4" gap between it and the frame side. I didn't want to remove the seat suspension spring (a large U-shaped piece of spring steel lying on it's side) since it mounts with carriage bolts that are upside down, and access to them is extremely difficult. 

 

This requires me to twist and push the tank into it's position, and leaves no room to connect a short hose to tubing.  I suspect it also caused the hose to lie on top of the steel channel below the 1 1/2" hole, instead of slipping into the gap.

 

Another option would be to remove the left wheel and fender... however, once again, this tractor was designed before the age of ergonomics by someone who wouldn't have to repair it.  The fender screws are also extremely hard to reach-- I can get the nut off the bolt, but putting it back on would require me to shove and contort my stubby fingers into positions God didn't intend for them to bend.

 

I may have to do this anyway, but I sure don't want to... with a bad disk in my back and my knee surgery, I avoid getting down on the ground as much as possible...

 

Thanks again,

 

Smitty


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#10 Utah Smitty OFFLINE  

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Posted June 26, 2016 - 10:22 AM

I just replaced the fuel line on my new to me 18 6 with no problems. 1/4 in cord reinforced rubber line. On my tractor there was no reason to bend the line nearly hard enough to kink it. What is in the way to cause the tight bend    Don

The challenge is getting the tank in and lining up the hose with the slot between the frame and a steel brace or mount under the frame hole... I explained it in more detail in my reply to Dodge Trucker.  Unfortunately, the tractor is 35 miles away at my mother's and I didn't think to take pictures of the working area when I was there yesterday.

 

Regards,

 

Smitty



#11 Utah Smitty OFFLINE  

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Posted June 26, 2016 - 10:23 AM

Where the bend will be, you can slide a spring over it?
I haven't had that issue on any of mine, just make sure it isn't short and tie it up in several places

That's actually a very good idea... if I feed the hose and spring up through the slot and hole, then connect to the tank it should go in correctly...

 

I'll look into that.


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#12 Utah Smitty OFFLINE  

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Posted June 26, 2016 - 10:25 AM

Don't know situation for brand, but why not a brass elbow with barbs both directions at a hard bend part?  A new path for the hose?

The tank is plastic with a molded in hose barb.  I don't know of a way to put a brass elbow directly on the tank.  I could possibly use a short length of hose to connect the nipple with a brass elbow--I'll just have to check out the length of it...

 

Regards,

 

Smitty



#13 Utah Smitty OFFLINE  

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Posted June 26, 2016 - 10:30 AM

Copper is harder to work with and more expensive but that is all that was used years ago and still works today.  Just have to have a loop in the line some place if it is a longer run to take the vibration and have some give for removal.  Problem is most filters and tank connections now days are set up for a rubber fuel line.  Make sure you get fuel line and not a vacuum line.

Thanks...

 

I'm aware of the difference between fuel and vacuum line, but the guy at the auto parts store doesn't.  I sent my mom to get some fuel line and the guy gave her vacuum line...

 

That's the problem with the chain auto parts stores like Advanced, O'Reilly and Auto Zone... most of the employees aren't very knowledgeable about cars before the days of remove and replace.

 

I've been thinking of using some of the transluscent fuel line instead of reinforced rubber... It's smaller in diameter so it will make a smaller bend radius without kinking.  I'm just not sure how durable it will be in this application.

 

Regards,

 

Smitty


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#14 Tecumseh power ONLINE  

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Posted June 26, 2016 - 02:54 PM

If they have the line running through the tranny mount, that isn't the way it's supposed to go. It goes right above the brake rod . Let a few inches stick up through the hole. Put the tank on hold it up. Use long needle nose pliers to put the hose on the tank and your good to go. Do you have a pic of how they have it now?

Edited by Tecumseh power, June 26, 2016 - 02:55 PM.


#15 secondtry ONLINE  

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Posted June 26, 2016 - 06:41 PM

The challenge is getting the tank in and lining up the hose with the slot between the frame and a steel brace or mount under the frame hole... I explained it in more detail in my reply to Dodge Trucker.  Unfortunately, the tractor is 35 miles away at my mother's and I didn't think to take pictures of the working area when I was there yesterday.

 

Regards,

 

Smitty

    Ok. My procedure. I went to town and bought 10 feet of 1/4 reinforced rubber fuel line, to much but extra just goes in stock. On my tractor there is a strap held in place buy the upper left rear fender bolt which bends around the fuel line to hold it. I could feel the strap when I reached up under the tractor to find out why the line would not pull out with the tank. I removed the fender bolt to release the strap. Now the plastic tank came out with the existing line strap and all. The fender bolt is a little challenging. Remove the old line from the tank replace with new. After making careful note of orientation remove the strap from the old line and bend it around the new line. Fish the new line carefully through the frame pulling the slack out as you put the tank back in place. If you put the strap in the correct place with the orientation it will now be possible to replace the fender bolt and strap in its original position. On my tractor at least This lashup seems to have worked for the last 40 years or so and is working fine now. Note I said replacing that fender bolt and strap is possible not easy. good luck         Don in Washington state      


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