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HF compressor question


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#1 Phluphy OFFLINE  

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Posted June 24, 2016 - 05:03 PM

I do not have a way to check this myself, at least not here in the shop.

The drain valve is such that I have to lift the end in order to drain moisture from tank and I would rather put in an adapter and 90 so a short piece can be run out to a ball valve.

Anyone know the thread size, metric, or, whatever, on HF compressors drain valves?



#2 WNYTractorTinkerer ONLINE  

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Posted June 24, 2016 - 05:21 PM

It's most likely 1/4" NPT.  I remove the butterfly valve and install a 90° ell which will connect to a 1/8" copper tube..  Then I install a ball valve @ knee to waist high and direct the pipe into a bucket to catch the water..  It works great..


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#3 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted June 24, 2016 - 07:15 PM

It's most likely 1/4" NPT.  I remove the butterfly valve and install a 90° ell which will connect to a 1/8" copper tube..  Then I install a ball valve @ knee to waist high and direct the pipe into a bucket to catch the water..  It works great..

I agree, likely 1/4" NPT.  That reminds me....I need to drain the air compressor at work, and clean it's check valve.


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#4 Phluphy OFFLINE  

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Posted June 24, 2016 - 08:55 PM

Thanks for the replies. Have several 1/4  NPT fittings etc. Figured since it was made on the other side, it was more than likely metric and didn't want to risk buggering the threads if I made the wrong decision.

Will pull the fitting tomorrow and see if there's a match. If not...taxi time. 



#5 Phluphy OFFLINE  

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Posted June 24, 2016 - 09:55 PM

Rats...Took a 14 mm socket to get it out so thinking it's metric. Off to Ace, hoping they have metric fittings. But then, the other day not one person in the store knew what a shackle was...until I literally drew them a picture and that wasn't so easy with these fumbling hands.  Will make a call first on the fitting situation.

Thanks for the responses. 


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#6 ol' stonebreaker ONLINE  

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Posted June 24, 2016 - 10:14 PM

 But then, the other day not one person in the store knew what a shackle was...

  Most everyone likes to call a shackle a clevis. An old crane operator years ago explained to me that farmers use clevises, iron workers use shackles. A farmer puts a cotter pin in a clevis pin and plows for years with it. An iron worker screws a shackle pin in just snug and then backs it off 1/8 of a turn. If you don't back it off then after a hard lift you're reaching for the crescent wrench to get it loose. If you must use a shackle to drag things over the ground then you use that crescent wrench to tighten the pin down so you don't find yourself looking for that pin that unscrewed itself. All my working life I used far more shackles than clevises!!

                                                Mike 


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#7 ol' stonebreaker ONLINE  

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Posted June 24, 2016 - 10:17 PM

 If it is 1/4" NPT try to find a brass street ell. It will protrude less than a common street ell.

                                        Mike


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#8 JBRamsey OFFLINE  

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Posted June 24, 2016 - 11:01 PM

NAPA should have them.
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#9 Phluphy OFFLINE  

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Posted June 24, 2016 - 11:12 PM

 If it is 1/4" NPT try to find a brass street ell. It will protrude less than a common street ell.

                                        Mike

I have street L's and right you are about how they take less space, and, no dice on the NPT. Wrong thread.


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#10 Phluphy OFFLINE  

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Posted June 24, 2016 - 11:17 PM

  Most everyone likes to call a shackle a clevis. An old crane operator years ago explained to me that farmers use clevises, iron workers use shackles. A farmer puts a cotter pin in a clevis pin and plows for years with it. An iron worker screws a shackle pin in just snug and then backs it off 1/8 of a turn. If you don't back it off then after a hard lift you're reaching for the crescent wrench to get it loose. If you must use a shackle to drag things over the ground then you use that crescent wrench to tighten the pin down so you don't find yourself looking for that pin that unscrewed itself. All my working life I used far more shackles than clevises!!

                                                Mike 

I move several heavy logs with the log mover, shackles are all I know. I've always considered mechanical connections i.e. actuating arms etc. to operating rods to be clevis connections. Eh, "tomato-tomahto" depends where, and how. Thanks


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#11 toomanytoys84 OFFLINE  

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Posted June 25, 2016 - 10:15 AM

shackle_530-021-00.png

Shackle, or screw pin shackle

 

F-WRC.jpg

 

Clevis, I've more commonly heard these as a wire rope clip/clamp.

 

That's what I consider the two, but working in the coal mines, we have different names for some stuff.

Wire%20Rope.jpg

 

My favorite, this wire roper gripper is known as a "pork chop"

 

Also hose clamps are always "breeze bands"


Edited by toomanytoys84, June 25, 2016 - 10:17 AM.

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