Jump to content

Nominations for Tractor of the Month
Garden Tractors and Parts on eBay



Photo
- - - - -

Driveway erosion - what to do?


  • Please log in to reply
15 replies to this topic

#1 jrbublitz1 OFFLINE  

jrbublitz1
  • Member
  • Member No: 82060
  • 10 Thanks
  • 19 posts

Posted June 19, 2016 - 03:03 PM

Has anyone here had experience with fixing erosion problems? I'm looking for so advice on what we have going on here.

Our house is on an easement road with two other houses. I kind of inherited upkeep of easement during the summer after building a grader last summer after we moved in to smooth out all the potholes. We still have some washout troubles so I've started started researching what we can do to help with drainage. Right now the easement does not have any kind of crown what so ever (and current equipment doesn't allow for me to make one). I've stuff regarding drainage ditches and drain channels that run through a driveway. I'm not sure though what the best solution is. I'll post some pictures here to hopefully give some perspective.

This is one hill in front of our house that washes out.
uploadfromtaptalk1466366254290.jpg

uploadfromtaptalk1466366370298.jpg

uploadfromtaptalk1466366425017.jpg

uploadfromtaptalk1466366446809.jpg

uploadfromtaptalk1466366458716.jpg

uploadfromtaptalk1466366470128.jpg

This is what I have for a grader. I pull it behind my atv.
uploadfromtaptalk1466366570103.jpg

Edited by jrbublitz1, June 19, 2016 - 03:06 PM.

  • boyscout862 said thank you

#2 propane1 ONLINE  

propane1
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 54307
  • 6,123 Thanks
  • 3,208 posts
  • Location: Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, Canada

Posted June 19, 2016 - 03:33 PM

You need bigger equipment to make a crown. Or get someone to do it , then you could maintain it. Just a thought.

Noel
  • Cvans and boyscout862 have said thanks

#3 boyscout862 OFFLINE  

boyscout862
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 8923
  • 9,807 Thanks
  • 7,547 posts
  • Location: N.E. Connecticut

Posted June 19, 2016 - 03:44 PM

Depending where you are, you can crown the center or make one side higher than the other. If you get icy conditions you may be forced to crown the center. You have to get the water off of the road. You will also have to take down the shoulders(sides) to let the water get off the road.

If the water stays on the road, the stream running down the road will wash out the sands and create small swales and potholes. Traffic will make these worst and the next rain will grow the problem. A small crown, 1/8" to 1/4" per foot side slope will usually get the water to the side. If the shoulder is clear the water will just drain sideways and not cause trouble.

You can probably jury rig your drag to work with a wood shim under one side but you will be much happier with a drag blade on wheels that you can adjust the horizontal and vertical angles of the blade. Usually you want the leading edge of the blade to be on the right as you work on the right shoulder. This will pull the gravel from the shoulder out into the road to help fill the center. Work slowly taking light cuts to void damaging your machine. Your drag should then work nice for the final smooting.

Drainage swales or pipes may be necessary but wait to see how regrading does. Pipes can be expensive and will plug up easily. Any pipe less than 12" will have a tendancy to plug easily and becomes a big liability problem. Let us know how it goes. Good Luck, Rick
  • HDWildBill and Sawdust have said thanks

#4 Cat385B ONLINE  

Cat385B

    Therapy CAT

  • Senior Member
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 8002
  • 11,757 Thanks
  • 8,925 posts
  • Location: MN

Posted June 19, 2016 - 03:44 PM

How much water is built up on it when it storms that causes it to wash out? And which picture above shows the spot where the water exits the road?



#5 shorty ONLINE  

shorty

    Member

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Member No: 6172
  • 3,582 Thanks
  • 3,961 posts
  • Location: Lancaster County Pa

Posted June 19, 2016 - 03:57 PM

After i reconfigured my stone driveway, I had to go out in the rain to watch the water flow. Then move my swales accordingly. Some to keep it off the drive and some to direct it off.
  • boyscout862 said thank you

#6 chieffan OFFLINE  

chieffan
  • Senior Member
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 62695
  • 6,168 Thanks
  • 4,512 posts
  • Location: SW Iowa

Posted June 19, 2016 - 03:58 PM

Boysacout862 has the right idea.  Looks like you have some material to work with but will need bigger & heavier equipment to work with.  Even a compact tractor with a blade will help a lot.  Move small amounts at a time, work it when it is good and damp after a rain and pack good as you go.  If you get it to thick without packing it will wash away.  You want just enough crown to have the water run to the side but not to fast.

 

I live in hilly country and have a new Co. grader operator who thinks he needs a large "windrow" of rock, dirt, grass etc. to work with next time.  Leaves this windrow at the side up and down hill.  Every time we get a hard rain we have 6 - 10" deep washouts down the side of the road next to his windrow.  This is what you really want to avoid.  Good luck.


  • boyscout862 and oldedeeres have said thanks

#7 jrbublitz1 OFFLINE  

jrbublitz1
  • Member
  • Member No: 82060
  • 10 Thanks
  • 19 posts

Posted June 19, 2016 - 05:02 PM

The side of the driveway has two banked stretches (one is across from the house in the first picture). Water runs off these two spots and then down hill on the easement causing the washout.

The second and third pictures are at the lowest spots of the easement where the water drains off to the woods. I haven't been around during a good storm yet to see the actual water flow.

I need to do a redesign on my grader. I agree though, need something on wheels with pivoting blade I can raise and lower.

Edited by jrbublitz1, June 19, 2016 - 06:51 PM.

  • MH81 said thank you

#8 MH81 ONLINE  

MH81

    Proud to be Deplorable

  • Staff Admin
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 802
  • 27,338 Thanks
  • 28,646 posts
  • Location: N. W. PA

Posted June 20, 2016 - 06:48 AM

My limited experience is that the banked areas will need to have a ditch between the road and the bank. May even cause you to move the road over a little to allow for the ditch. How wide of an easement do you have to work with? Is it defined in feet or just a generic "what you need" verbaige?

#9 jrbublitz1 OFFLINE  

jrbublitz1
  • Member
  • Member No: 82060
  • 10 Thanks
  • 19 posts

Posted June 20, 2016 - 07:05 AM

Right now it's wide enough for 2 vehicles to pass, though in most spots not exactly comfortable to do so. I got to thinking about it yesterday and was wondering about the possibility of digging in a ditch on that side. I'll have to talk with the neighbors to find out what kind of limitations we have to work with.

#10 boyscout862 OFFLINE  

boyscout862
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 8923
  • 9,807 Thanks
  • 7,547 posts
  • Location: N.E. Connecticut

Posted June 20, 2016 - 08:56 AM

A ditch can become a big liability. Keep it small and don't allow the side slope to exceed 1v to 4h on the road side. Good Luck, Rick

#11 toppop52 OFFLINE  

toppop52
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 54420
  • 3,520 Thanks
  • 3,397 posts
  • Location: Lower Eastern Shore of Maryland

Posted June 20, 2016 - 09:26 AM

Can you build a berm/slope on the upside of the road in the spots where the water crosses onto the road, in order to turn it a way from the road. If so, that would be a lot easier and safer than a ditch, from a liability standpoint.I often find it easier to keep water away, than fix the damage or manage it's direction after the fact. I have a foot per hundred of drop across my property, I have a septic mound and was worried heavy rains with the amount of drop on my property would cause erosion of the mound, so I went uphill about 50' and built a berm, I designed it so it turns the water out both ends in a gentle diffusing pattern that steers the water well past the mound.


Edited by toppop52, June 20, 2016 - 09:27 AM.

  • oldedeeres and propane1 have said thanks

#12 jrbublitz1 OFFLINE  

jrbublitz1
  • Member
  • Member No: 82060
  • 10 Thanks
  • 19 posts

Posted June 20, 2016 - 01:55 PM

That would be another option I can discuss with the neighbors. If I'm understanding you correctly there is a bunch of brush we would need to clear out to make it work.

#13 jrbublitz1 OFFLINE  

jrbublitz1
  • Member
  • Member No: 82060
  • 10 Thanks
  • 19 posts

Posted June 20, 2016 - 06:43 PM

Having some brainstorming here. Say we did do a ditch. How small can it be? What if we had a small ditch like 1 ft deep, 2 ft across (maybe even smaller) along the banked portions of the easement. If we needed to break up flow line it with a bunch of melon size to softball size rocks. Then crown the driveway to direct water to said ditch. The other side of the easement would just run off into the woods.

#14 jrbublitz1 OFFLINE  

jrbublitz1
  • Member
  • Member No: 82060
  • 10 Thanks
  • 19 posts

Posted June 21, 2016 - 08:49 PM

Maybe I don't even need a ditch. What if I cut a small trench with a back blade? Or can crowning even be enough?

#15 MH81 ONLINE  

MH81

    Proud to be Deplorable

  • Staff Admin
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 802
  • 27,338 Thanks
  • 28,646 posts
  • Location: N. W. PA

Posted June 22, 2016 - 05:48 AM

Water will follow the path of least resistance.
If the ditch is a liability that can't be worked around, Give it an easier path some other way.




Top