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Recovering A Bowl Or Dish Style Seat Pan With The Crimped Outer Edge

seat upholstery tractor seat repair tractor seat recover how to repair a garden tracto

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#31 29 Chev ONLINE  

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Posted April 06, 2017 - 03:07 PM

This next step requires a bit of patience but the results will be well worth it in my opinion.  I have tried using both the general trim adhesive and the super trim adhesive offered by 3M to glue the sides and back of the cover to the foam padding and while they will hold initially I have found that if the seat is left outside on a sunny day and gets warm the bond will let go from these products in this application and as a result I do not recommend it for this next step.  If you use it you will probably notice after a while there are areas of the cover that will appear loose and wrinkly. As you can see the cover looks very nice with very little puckering or wrinkles in the first picture but in the second picture after it got warm in the sun for about half an hour on a summers day you can see little puckers forming where the bond has let go.  The cover still looks ok but not as good as it did in the first picture in my opinion.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Cover When First Set Out.jpg
  • 2 Cover Starting To Loose Its Bond.jpg

Edited by 29 Chev, April 06, 2017 - 06:56 PM.

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#32 29 Chev ONLINE  

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Posted April 06, 2017 - 03:29 PM

I have found that the 3M weatherstrip adhesive works well at bonding the vinyl to the foam so it is what I use.  Start at the bottom at the back and apply the adhesive to both the foam and the vinyl in a section about 2" high.   I find that a small flat screwdriver or a small plastic spreader for body filler works to spread the adhesive on the surfaces - once it gets tacky (about two or three minutes) you can stick the glued areas together.  You can then apply the adhesive to the sides and stick them together.  Then apply the adhesive to the rear area again about 2" higher and keep working your way along the sides and back until you get to the top of the foam.  As you are sticking the areas together make sure you do not get any puckers or wrinkles in the cover material - as you can see in the pictures the cover forms well to the foam as you glue the areas - use your hand from the top side to bond the cover to the foam where you left off and work your way upwards.  Once you reach the top of the foam you can apply a little bit of adhesive across the front area if you wish to give it a good bond to the foam as well.  You will notice there may be a few small winkles along the upper edge as you can see in the pictures but they are normal and should be barely noticeable when the cover is installed at the end.   

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 3M Weahterstrip Adhesive.jpg
  • 2 Weatherstrip Adhesive Applied At Rear Of Cover.jpg
  • 3 Weatherstrip Adhesive Spread Out At Rear Of Cover.jpg
  • 4 Cover Stuck To Foam.jpg
  • 5 View From Cover Side.jpg
  • 6 Adhesive Applied To Side.jpg
  • 7 Adhesive Applied To Side.jpg
  • 8 Side Stuck To Foam.jpg
  • 9 Side Stuck To Foam.jpg
  • 10 View From Top Side.jpg
  • 11 Adhesive Applied At Back.jpg
  • 12 Cover Stuck To Foam.jpg
  • 13 Working Way Up Sides And Back With Adhesive.jpg
  • 14 Working Way Up Sides And Back With Adhesive.jpg
  • 15 Sides And Back Stuck To Foam.jpg
  • 16 Sides And Back Stuck To Foam.jpg
  • 17 Sides And Back Stuck To Foam.jpg
  • 18 Sides And Back Stuck To Foam.jpg
  • 19 Apply A Bit Of Adhesive At Front.jpg

Edited by 29 Chev, April 07, 2017 - 08:49 AM.

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#33 29 Chev ONLINE  

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Posted April 06, 2017 - 04:52 PM

Now you will need to find some rope to use as a welt around the outer edge of the cover - for this seat I used a 3/16" diameter rope.  Measure around the outside edge of the seat pan and add about 3" and cut a length of the rope off.  You will also need the second tool you made that I call the closer - I will repeat that you may be tempted to use an ordinary pair of vise grips but I do not recommend this as the jaws on the vise grips will mark up the edge of the seat lip.  Set the jaws of the closer so they have a 1/4" space between them when the vise grip is clamped closed.  You can now work your way around the lip of the seat pan and squeeze the lip so that it will gently trap and hold the cover material wrapped around the rope - leave a space of about two inches in between the spots where you squeeze the lip - you can use a piece of vinyl the cover was made out of and the rope to test the grip.  You want to be able to push the cover and welt (rope) down into the groove so it does not come back out but you do not want it to require a lot of force to push the welt down into the groove.  I use a large blunt flat screwdriver to push on the welt to get it to go into the groove - CAUTION - make sure the blade on the screwdriver is not sharp and that you push on the welt with the blade and not on the cover - be careful you do not slip.  If you slip off the welt then the screwdriver blade can puncture the cover material which will not be good as the mark may show.  That is why you want the lip to only gently grip the cover and welt as it will take less force to get the welt down in the groove.  In the front corners and the area where the pleated section joins the outer part at the front you can leave the lip loose and squeeze it a little after you have worked the cover and welt into the lip groove in those areas.  Once you have the lip squeezed you can start in the middle at the front and start to work the cover and welt into the lip groove - I use a clamp to hold the welt in the area of the groove and then I push on the welt with the screwdriver - I will repeat - make sure you push on the welt with the screwdriver and do not slip or you may end up cutting the vinyl with the end of screwdriver blade.  Work your way across the front - first to the left and then to the right - you will probably find the areas where the cover pieces join is a little harder to get into the groove as the material is thicker at the joint.  Once you get the front worked in you can work around one corner and then the other - if you find the welt is trying to come back out you can push it back down in the groove and give the lip a little squeeze tighter to make it trap the welt better.  If you are using the closer tool in the corners you will have to use the short jaw on the back side of the pan - on most of the lip you can use the wider jaw on the back side of the pan and the short jaw on the outside so the lip is being bent on the outside in small sections.  Be careful when squeezing the lip around the corners and only try and close it a little bit in one spot and then move the tool a little bit along the lip and squeeze it there - if you try and close the lip a lot all at once in the corners it may crack the metal. 

After you have the front corners worked in you can move up the sides.  The cover material should be forming nicely around the corners with very little puckering or wrinkling - if you have some wrinkles you can pull the cover and welt back out for a short section, pull on the vinyl a little bit as you push the welt back in and work any major wrinkles out.  Once the sides are worked in you can work your way across the top to the centre at the back - apply a little bit of a pulling force on the vinyl as you move the clamp along the edge to keep the vinyl snug and work out any wrinkles or puckers.  Once you get to the centre you can cut one end of the welt and force it into the lip groove, cut the other end of the welt and force it into the groove as well.  At this point I would suggest you take a break and let the seat and cover sit for a day (or overnight) and have a look at it after several hours and see how it looks.  If it suits you and has no major wrinkles or puckers at the outer edge great - if not you can pull the cover and welt back out of the lip and work the wrinkles out as you push the welt back in.       

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Three Sixteenths Inch Diameter Rope To Use As Welt Around Edge.jpg
  • 2 Measure Around Outer Edge Of Seat Pan And Add Three Inches.jpg
  • 3 Set The Tool To Aboout Quarter Inch Space WHen Clamped.jpg
  • 4 Squeeze Lip So It Will Grip Cover With Welt.jpg
  • 5 Start In Centre At Front And Use Clamp To Hold Welt.jpg
  • 6 Use Blunt Flat Screwdriver To Push On Welt.jpg
  • 7 Push Welt Into Groove Trapping Cover.jpg
  • 8 Cover Starting To Get Trapped In Groove.jpg
  • 9 Cover Starting To Get Trapped In Groove.jpg
  • 10 Work Welt Into Groove Across Front.jpg
  • 11 And Around The Corners.jpg
  • 12 Use Tool With Short Jaw On Inside When Closing Lip Around Corners.jpg
  • 13 Use Tool With Short Jaw On Inside When Closing Lip Around Corners.jpg
  • 14 Cover Forms Nicely Around Corner.jpg
  • 15 Working Welt Into Lip Along Sides.jpg
  • 16 Working Welt In At Top.jpg
  • 17 Working Welt In At Top.jpg
  • 18 One End Of Welt Cut.jpg
  • 19 Cut End Worked Into Lip.jpg
  • 20 Other End Of Welt Cut.jpg
  • 21 Welt In Lip Goove.jpg

Edited by 29 Chev, April 07, 2017 - 08:43 AM.

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#34 29 Chev ONLINE  

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Posted April 06, 2017 - 04:56 PM

You should end up with a cover that looks similar to the pictures below and has very little puckering or wrinkles in the material.  If you have accomplished this give yourself another pat on the back - you have done well and have a very nice looking seat that can soon take its place on your tractor.  Please note the clamp is only on the cover to give my camera something to focus on as it does not like to focus well on a large area of one colour.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Cover With Welt Down In Lip And Very Few Wrinkles.jpg
  • 2 Cover With Welt Down In Lip And Very Few Wrinkles.jpg
  • 3 Cover With Welt Down In Lip And Very Few Wrinkles.jpg
  • 4 Cover With Welt Down In Lip And Very Few Wrinkles.jpg

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#35 Newpaws493 OFFLINE  

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Posted April 07, 2017 - 06:47 AM

 factory pressed hardly compares. High Quality Works, Awesome techniques. Thank You for your Time & Efforts! :thumbs: :thumbs: :thumbs:

:good_job:


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#36 29 Chev ONLINE  

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Posted April 08, 2017 - 01:24 PM

After you have left the seat for several hours (or days) you can examine your work with a fresh pair of eyes - if it suits you great - if you have a few puckers you can remove the welt and try and work them out.  As you can see in the first picture I put a clear garbage bag over the cover to keep dirt, bugs flies, etc. off of the cover when I am not working on it - I use a clear one so I can see what is in the bag.  Once you are satisfied with the way the cover looks you can move on to closing the lip back up.  As you will notice in pictures 2 and 3 the cover is thicker where the join occurs due to the multiple layers of the material - if you leave the material the way it is you will not be able to close the outer lip in as far in this location and as a result the lip will stick out a bit in this area - not a big deal but there is a way to make it so the lip closure appears fairly uniform.  What I usually do is mark where the top of the outer lip is on the back of the material as you can see in picture 4.  Once you have it marked you can pull the material up out of the groove, slit the material down each side of the join to just below the mark with a  razor blade, and then cut the joined material across between the two slits just below the mark as you can see In pictures 5, 6 and 7. Now you can push the welt and material back down in the lip groove and the cover material will no longer be in the road for closing the lip.  With that accomplished you can now make a choice about whether to squeeze the lip closed and then trim the cover material around the lip or trim the cover material around the lip and then squeeze the lip closed - I have done it both ways and found that both have advantages and disadvantages - leaving the excess material in place until you paint the seat pan can help in the masking of the seat but trimming the cover with the lip open you have less chance of cutting into the seat cover with the razor blade as it is a lot easier to see where the edge of the razor blade is since there is a space between the outer and inner material cover.  I am going to show trimming the excess material first using a razor blade - if you are doing this for the first time I believe it is the easier way to ensure that your hard work is not damaged by a slip with the razor blade.  I start at the back in the centre and work my way down the left side applying a gentle outward pull on the material with one hand while I use the razor blade to cut the excess material off even with the seat lip.  As you can see in picture 9 the tip of the razor blade just shows through the material which is where you want to keep it so it does not cut into the cover material that is on the inner side of the welt.  Take your time and work your way around the side, around the corner, across the front, and back up to the centre at the back.  If you feel your hands cramping or hurting stop and take a break - it is not a race and a slip with the razor blade can damage the cover and really dampen your spirits.  Once you have finished trimming the material give yourself another pat on the back - you are one step closer to having a beautiful seat that you can be proud of for your tractor.  

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Clear Garbage Bag To Protect Cover When I Am Not Working On Seat.jpg
  • 2 Material Thicker Where Pieces Join Due To Multiple Layers.jpg
  • 3 Material Thicker Where Pieces Join Due To Multiple Layers.jpg
  • 4 Material Marked Where Outer Lip Is On Back.jpg
  • 5 Material Pulled Up Out Of Lip Groove.jpg
  • 6 Material Slit On Both Sides Of Join Just Below Mark.jpg
  • 7 Material Cut Just Below Mark WIth Razor Blade.jpg
  • 8 Material Pushed Back Down Into Lip Groove.jpg
  • 9 Trimming Cover Material Around Outer Edge Of Lip With Razor Blade.jpg
  • 10 Pull Cover Material Away From Lip As You Trim.jpg
  • 11 Material Trimmed Along Left Side.jpg
  • 12 Material Trimmed Around Seat Pan Lip.jpg
  • 13 Material Trimmed Around Seat Pan Lip.jpg

Edited by 29 Chev, April 08, 2017 - 04:35 PM.

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#37 29 Chev ONLINE  

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Posted April 08, 2017 - 04:53 PM

Now you can start to squeeze the lip closed to trap the cover material and the welt.  I start at the front where one of the joins in the material is and work my way across to the other join.  Patience is the key as it takes a little time and you will have to adjust the screw on the closer tool so the jaws go closed a little further as you squeeze the lip shut.  Close the lip a little at a time in one spot and then move over about an inch and squeeze the lip there - if you try to force the lip closed too much all at once you may crack the metal or distort the lip.  As you are closing the lip up you can use the large flat bladed screwdriver to push the welt and cover material inside the trough so that the outer edge where you trimmed the cover does not show - use caution and be gentle as you do not want to slip and cut the material with the screwdriver blade.  Once you have the front of the lip in fairly close to the cover you can then work on the front corners.  In this area you will have to turn the tool around so the narrow jaw is on the inside and again work slowly squeezing the lip a little bit at a time in one spot and then moving the tool.  The corners are usually the hardest to bend and most prone for the metal to crack if you try and close one spot in the lip too much at one time.  You can use a piece of light cardboard ( I use an old garlic bread box) as a thickness gauge as shown in picture 11 to tell if the lip is squeezed tight enough - you should be able to gently work a piece of the cardboard in between the edge of the lip and the cover - it should be a snug fit.  If you can do this great - if not then the lip may be too close to the cover and can cut into the material over time.  If it is too tight you can use the spreader tool to open the lip back up just a bit to get the proper clearance - CAUTION - be gentle and make sure the jaw catches the metal lip and not the cover material or you may rip the cover.  If you can't get the jaw under the lip in a spot that is too tight move down or up about an inch and try it there and work towards the tight area.  After you get the corners done you can work up one side, across the back and down the other side until the lip is all squeezed together. 

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Starting To Squeeze Lip Closed Using Closer Tool.jpg
  • 2 Lip Squeeed Togehter A Bit.jpg
  • 3 Lip Squeeed Togehter A Bit.jpg
  • 4 Lip Squeezed Closed Across Front.jpg
  • 5 Lip Squeezed Closed Across Front.jpg
  • 6 Closing Lip In COrner.jpg
  • 7 Closing Lip In COrner.jpg
  • 8 Pushing Material Below Lip Edge With Large Flat Screwdriver.jpg
  • 9 Lip Closed Around Corner.jpg
  • 10 Lip Closed Around Back.jpg
  • 11 Cardboard Worked Under Lip To Make Sure Lip Is Not Too Tight.jpg
  • 12 Cardboard Pulled Out.jpg
  • 13 Lip A Little Tight And Could Cut Cover Material.jpg
  • 14 Lip Spread A Little Bit WIth Spreader Tool So It Passes Cardboard Test.jpg
  • 15 Cardboard Removed.jpg

Edited by 29 Chev, April 23, 2017 - 07:09 PM.

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#38 29 Chev ONLINE  

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Posted April 08, 2017 - 05:06 PM

You should end up with a seat that looks similar to these pictures.  Put a light duty cotton work glove on one hand and run your gloved hand gently along the outside of the lip to check to make sure there are no sharp edges - use caution that you do not cut yourself.  If the glove snags or catches then examine the lip to find out why and correct the problem with a file or a piece of course sandpaper to remove the sharp edge on the metal.  You want the seat to have a nice smooth edge that won't cut someone if they happen to touch or  grasp it - SAFETY, SAFETY, SAFETY.

 

If the lip feels good and smooth you can try feeling the edge gently your bare hand and if things feel smooth and nothing catches you then give yourself a big pat on the back as you should have a very nice looking seat that you recovered yourself.  Take a break and admire your handy work and be proud.

 

 

                                                                                       :dancingbanana:  :dancingbanana:  :dancingbanana:  :dancingbanana:  :dancingbanana:  

 

The last steps will be to mask off the cover, fill in any imperfections and pitted areas with body filler along the edge of the seat lip, and prime and paint the back of the seat. 

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Lip Closed Up Again.jpg
  • 2 Lip Closed Up Again.jpg
  • 3 Lip Closed Up Again.jpg
  • 4 Lip Closed Up Again.jpg
  • 5 Lip Closed Up Again.jpg

Edited by 29 Chev, April 23, 2017 - 07:10 PM.

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#39 29 Chev ONLINE  

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Posted April 10, 2017 - 04:28 PM

I would suggest that you mask off the vinyl of the seat next - this will keep the vinyl material clean while you prep the metal and get the seat back ready to paint.  I ran a piece of 3/4" masking tape around the outside edge of the vinyl keeping the tape as close as I could to the seat pan lip.  Then I used a piece of masking paper and taped it at the front and set the stapler on the paper so the paper would conform to the seat shape - as you will notice I left the masking paper a little long at the back.  I put a few little folds in the paper to help shape it and then I cut the paper at the back to match the curve of the seat and taped the paper across the back.  I used the extra piece I cut off to form two strips to cover up the two spots at the side where the paper was not wide enough and taped them on.  The reason I made the paper conform to the seat shape is that it makes the seat easier to mask and there is less of a chance of ripping the paper.  When you go to paint the seat you will have to set the vinyl side of the seat up on something so that the back and side edges are not resting on anything and are exposed so you can easily spray paint them.  Once the seat was masked I mixed up a little body filler and applied it to the outer seat lip to fill in the rust pits - hopefully your seat will be in better shape and you won't need any filler.  I set the seat off to the side to let the body filler harden and will start sanding it tomorrow. 

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Masking Tape Around Outside Of Vinyl.jpg
  • 2 Masking Paper Formed To Seat Shape.jpg
  • 3 Masking Paper Formed To Seat Shape.jpg
  • 4 Masking Paper Cut To Top Curve Of Seat.jpg
  • 5 Masking Paper Taped At Top.jpg
  • 6 Covering Up Sides Uisng Pieces Cut From Excess Back Paper.jpg
  • 7 Vinyl Masked.jpg
  • 8 Vinyl Masked.jpg
  • 9 Body Filler Applied To Lip.jpg
  • 10 Body Filler Applied To Lip.jpg

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#40 29 Chev ONLINE  

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Posted April 11, 2017 - 05:01 PM

Sanded the first coat of body filler, vacuumed the filler dust and then applied a second coat of body filler.  I have found that as the body filler starts to set up you can use a small flat screwdriver to gently scrape any body filler that gets on the inside edge of the metal lip to remove it which makes sanding where the edge of the inner lip much easier.  I also use a sharp utility knife to shave the body filler a little bit as it sets up which gets rid of any excess build up - just have to be careful you do not slip and cut the cover.  I have found a plastic divider out of a parts tray works nicely as a small spreader for applying the body filler when working on small areas such as the seat lip.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 First Coat Of Body Filler Sanded.jpg
  • 2 First Coat Of Body Filler Sanded.jpg
  • 3 First Coat Of Body Filler Sanded.jpg
  • 4 First Coat Of Body Filler Sanded.jpg
  • 5 First Coat Of Body Filler Sanded.jpg
  • 6 First Coat Of Body Filler Sanded.jpg
  • 7 First Coat Of Body Filler Sanded.jpg
  • 8 First Coat Of Body Filler Sanded.jpg
  • 9 First Coat Of Body Filler Sanded.jpg
  • 10 First Coat Of Body Filler Sanded.jpg
  • 11 Second Coat Of Filler Applied.jpg
  • 12 Second Coat Of Filler Applied.jpg
  • 13 Second Coat Of Filler Applied.jpg
  • 14 Second Coat Of Filler Applied.jpg
  • 15 Parts Drawer Divider Works As Small Spreader.jpg

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Posted April 17, 2017 - 03:28 PM

Once you have the seat lip and pan smoothed up to the point where you are happy with the way it looks you can then prepare to paint the seat pan.  I have found that masking tape tends to pull away from the edge of the seat after it has been on for a few days so I would suggest you retape around where the seat lip is as you can see in pictures 3 and 4.  I take a strip about 6" long of tape and lay it along a spot on the lip and then with a small flat screwdriver gently work the tape underneath the seat lip - this will give you a nice tight seal that the paint won't get through and still allow the paint to coat the side edge of the seat lip so that all the lip metal gets painted.  Once you have the tape applied you can prime the edge and do any final prep work before applying the paint.  I have found that this particular seat sits nicely on top of a front garden tractor tire - I tape a sheet of masking paper to the tire to keep any dirt and contamination off of the seat.  Once you are done priming the top of the seat you can flip it over and set the masked area of the vinyl one top of the tire which allows the seat lip and back area to be primed.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Body Filler Sanded On Back Side.jpg
  • 2 Body Filler Sanded On Back Side.jpg
  • 3 Masking Tape Pulling Away From Seat Lip Edge.jpg
  • 4 Masking Tape Pulling Away From Seat Lip Edge.jpg
  • 5 Strip Of Masking Tape To Work Under Seat Lip.jpg
  • 6 Working Masking Tape Under Seat Lip With Small Flar Screwdriver.jpg
  • 7 Masking Tape Worked Under Seat Lip With Small Flar Screwdriver.jpg
  • 8 Masking Tape Under Seat Lip All The Way Around Seat Edge.jpg
  • 9 Masking Tape Under Seat Lip All The Way Around Seat Edge.jpg
  • 10 Masking Tape Under Seat Lip All The Way Around Seat Edge.jpg
  • 11 Back Side Of Seat Edge Primed.jpg
  • 12 Back Side Of Seat Edge Primed.jpg
  • 13 Front Side Of Seat Lip Primed.jpg
  • 14 Front Side Of Seat Lip Primed.jpg

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Posted April 17, 2017 - 03:36 PM

Once you have the primer sanded and any final prep work done you can paint the seat pan.  I would suggest setting the seat face up first and applying several thin coats of paint around the lip to make sure it is painted and that the inner edge is covered - take your time and let the paint flash off between coats.  Once you are certain you have got the lip covered you can then flip the seat over and set the masked area on top of the tire and paint around the edge and the back of the seat - again take your time and let the paint flash off between coats.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Painting Around Seat Lip.jpg
  • 2 Painting Around Seat Lip.jpg
  • 3 Seat Flipped Over To Paint Bottom.jpg
  • 4 Seat Flipped Over To Paint Bottom.jpg
  • 5 Seat Flipped Over To Paint Bottom.jpg
  • 6 Seat Flipped Over To Paint Bottom.jpg
  • 7 Seat Flipped Over To Paint Bottom.jpg

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Posted April 17, 2017 - 03:49 PM

Once the paint has dried for a day or two you can unmask the vinyl.  Take your time and be gentle removing the masking tape as some cheaper tapes will stick very well if they have been left on things for several days.  The majority of the tape under the seat lip should pull out and come off but you may find a few spots where the tape rips and there is still some tape trapped under the lip.  If this happens you can use a small flat screwdriver and gently work the tape out from under the edge - be gentle as you do not want to damage the vinyl or the paint.  Once you have the seat unmasked you can give yourself another pat on the back and admire your handy work which is now ready to take its rightful place on your tractor.  If things have went well you now have a seat you can be proud of for years to come and when someone asks where you got the new seat you can tell them you redid the original one and smile knowing all your hard work is now one more thing you can be proud of. 

 

I hope you have enjoyed reading this thread as much as I have posting it and it is my sincere wish that it inspires you to give recovering a seat a try.    

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Starting To Unmask Seat.jpg
  • 2 Tape Stuck At Outer Edge To Vinyl.jpg
  • 3 Tape Stuck At Outer Edge To Vinyl.jpg
  • 4 Pieces Of Tape Trapped Under Seat Lip.jpg
  • 5 Pieces Of Tape Trapped Under Seat Lip.jpg
  • 6 Piece Of Tape Trapped Under Seat Lip.jpg
  • 7 Using Small Flat Screwdriver To Gently Free Tape.jpg
  • 8 Piece Of Tape Removed.jpg
  • 9 Finished Seat.jpg
  • 10 Finished Seat.jpg
  • 11 Finished Seat.jpg
  • 12 Finished Seat.jpg

  • WrenchinOnIt and Newpaws493 have said thanks

#44 WrenchinOnIt OFFLINE  

WrenchinOnIt
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Posted April 17, 2017 - 04:38 PM

NIIIIIIIIIICE !

Edited by WrenchinOnIt, April 17, 2017 - 04:49 PM.

  • Newpaws493 and 29 Chev have said thanks

#45 Newpaws493 OFFLINE  

Newpaws493
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Posted April 17, 2017 - 04:47 PM

THANK YOU for the time, efforts and energy required to conduct these lessons. I need a Bigger word than Inspired for for what they mean to me. You've set the bar high for Quality Craftsmanship, yet brought the methods down to earth for us mere mortals.

Continued Success in all you do. :thumbs: :urock: 


  • 29 Chev said thank you




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