Jump to content

Nominations for Tractor of the Month
Garden Tractors and Parts on eBay



Photo

Recovering A Bowl Or Dish Style Seat Pan With The Crimped Outer Edge

seat upholstery tractor seat repair tractor seat recover how to repair a garden tracto

  • Please log in to reply
19 replies to this topic

#16 29 Chev ONLINE  

29 Chev
  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 63590
  • 3,149 Thanks
  • 1,211 posts
  • Location: Ontario Canada

Posted June 17, 2016 - 01:23 PM

You can now glue the two side areas and stick them to the pan.  I used two clamps clamped to the padding material to keep the padding away from the pan while the glue dried - tie a string to each clamps and pull it sung while the glue gets tacky.  Once the first piece of padding is glued you can trim the edge with a pair of scissors - try and hold the scissors vertical so that you trim the material smoothly at the inside edge of the trough where the welt goes. Now you can cut ad glue the second layer of foam in the same manner and trim it the same way as shown in pictures #6, 7, 8 and 9.  Note the clamps in the pictures are just sitting there to give the viewer and better idea of how the padding conforms to the seat pan shape.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Puckered Areas Glued.jpg
  • 2 Edges Trimmed.jpg
  • 3 Edges Trimmed.jpg
  • 4 Second Piece Of Foam Cut.jpg
  • 5 Area Marked Where To Apply Glue.jpg
  • 6 Second Piece Of Foam Glued And Trimmed.jpg
  • 7 Second Piece Of Foam Glued And Trimmed.jpg
  • 8 Second Piece Of Foam Glued And Trimmed.jpg
  • 9 Second Piece Of Foam Glued And Trimmed.jpg

  • Alc and KennyP have said thanks

#17 29 Chev ONLINE  

29 Chev
  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 63590
  • 3,149 Thanks
  • 1,211 posts
  • Location: Ontario Canada

Posted June 17, 2016 - 02:15 PM

Now that you have the padding on give yourself another pat on the back - you are making some progress.

 

At this point I will mention that I did not have an original seat cover to work with so I got some pictures of a couple of seats with original covers and did some calculations and estimating and came up with a pattern that I felt was close to the original.  Once I had that I drew it out on some masking paper and tried it on the seat pan to see how well it would conform to the shape of the seat pan - you can see the results in picture #5.  As you can see the paper wrinkles badly around the curved area at the back and sides of the seat.  I decided to try and make my first cover attempt for this seat using one piece of vinyl and trying to heat form it with a heat gun.  While the finished cover did fit and looked not to bad I was not happy with the result and it required a lot of pulling, stretching and careful use of the heat gun so the material did not get too hot to make the cover fit and look decent.  You can see the initial puckers and wrinkling that resulted in picture #10 and the results of what the seat looked like in picture #11. I am going to show you how to make and install a two piece style of cover made out of two pieces of vinyl sewn together - it does not require the use of a heat gun to form it and the final result fits and looks better in my opinion - you can see what the finished seat with the two piece style of cover looks like in pictures #12 and #13.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Width At Front.jpg
  • 2 Width At Rear.jpg
  • 3 Depth.jpg
  • 4 Pattern Laid Out.jpg
  • 5 Test Fit Of Pleat Layout.jpg
  • 6 Glue Area Marked Out (1).jpg
  • 7 Glue Area Marked Out.jpg
  • 8 Glue Area Marked Out (4).jpg
  • 9 Glue Area Marked Out.jpg
  • 10 Glue Area Marked Out.jpg
  • 11 One Piece Cover.jpg
  • 12 Side View.jpg
  • 13 Seat Front View.jpg

  • Alc and KennyP have said thanks

#18 29 Chev ONLINE  

29 Chev
  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 63590
  • 3,149 Thanks
  • 1,211 posts
  • Location: Ontario Canada

Posted June 20, 2016 - 06:20 PM

Now you can start to layout what I will call the pleated area of the cover.  Most of the original covers used on this style of seat incorporated a bottom area ( sometimes referred to as the "butt" area)  that had pleats running side by side from the front to the back where the seat pan is flat.  Since I did not have an original cover I worked with pictures that other members were able to provide as well as finding pictures on the internet that showed where the pleats were located.  Using these pictures and doing some calculations of how wide the actual seat was in real life versus what the pictures measured I laid out a paper pattern to scale of this area. Make sure you leave some extra paper at the front to allow for the cover material that will go down the front part of the padding and fit in the seat pan trough and that you start at the centre and make each half of the pattern a mirror image of the other or the cover may not look balanced - use a square and a yard stick and when you are done fold the pattern in half and make sure it is equal.  Also make sure you allow a 3/8" seam width around the side and back edges where this piece will be sewn to another piece of material that will form the back and sides area of the cover. I used 1/4" thick sew foam to form the pleats for this seat and there was still a little shrinkage every time a pleat was sewn - I spaced the pleats on the pattern 1-5/8" apart and I lost about 1/16" with every pleat.  For those who do not understand this I would suggest you check out the other thread I did as it will explain about sewing pleats and the shrinkage that occurs every time a pleat is sewn - http://gardentractor...-tractor/page-2 starting at post #17.  Your pattern should be similar to the pattern in Picture #6.  You can then set the pattern on the seat and place another piece of paper underneath it that will become the side and back pattern.  Mark the centre of the bottom paper and cut the bottom paper along the centre line to the point where the pleated pattern will join it.  Then take the bottom paper and bring the front corners in towards the centre at the front until the paper lays fairly flat around the sides and back and mark the two edges where the pleated area will be sewn to it - you should end up a pattern similar to the one shown in picture #5 once it is trimmed - again you will have to leave a 3/8" seam allowance where it will join the pleated piece.  As you can see in picture #7 the two patterns do not appear to match where they will join when they are both laying flat.  I do not recommend that you use plastic to make the patterns as the plastic will not be stiff enough to show up the wrinkles and puckers you will get from the vinyl where as the paper will. Please note you may have to tape on extra pieces of paper along the sides as I have done to get an actual pattern that will provide enough vinyl to cover the sides adequately.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Bottom And Side Patterns Set On Seat Padding.jpg
  • 2 Bottom And Side Patterns Set On Seat Padding.jpg
  • 3 Bottom And Side Patterns Set On Seat Padding.jpg
  • 4 Bottom And Side Patterns Set On Seat Padding.jpg
  • 5 Side And Back Piece Pattern.jpg
  • 6 Pleated Area Pattern.jpg
  • 7 Pleated Area And Side Pattern Together.jpg

  • Alc said thank you

#19 Alc ONLINE  

Alc

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 1094
  • 5,458 Thanks
  • 6,624 posts
  • Location: Bangor Pa

Posted June 21, 2016 - 05:45 AM

It's amazing how much material you use when you lay it out flat !


  • 29 Chev said thank you

#20 29 Chev ONLINE  

29 Chev
  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 63590
  • 3,149 Thanks
  • 1,211 posts
  • Location: Ontario Canada

Posted June 21, 2016 - 10:44 AM

It's amazing how much material you use when you lay it out flat !

Yes it does use a bit more material than just making the cover in one piece but in my opinion the results are worth it in the way it fits the shape so much easier.  The pleated pattern could be turned a quarter turn so that it does not waste as much material when marking out the pieces for cutting.  When the two pieces are sewn together the outer piece of the cover is pulled together along the sides and as a results forces it to conform to the curves. 






Top