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#1 Greasy6020 ONLINE  

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Posted June 14, 2016 - 12:46 PM

this isnt one of those weird preachy things :thumbs:

 

so, i have wanted to try doing custom work on my gt making gardens for people. therefore i have questions and you guys may have answers. 

 

at my current job, i make $10.55 an hour canadian. so pennies an hour american lol. 

 

my jd 300 burns about 2.5 liters an hour, i have calculated that it costs $3.15 an hour for fuel. 

 

it takes about an hour for me to cover 2 acres @ 4 mph running a 4 foot cultivator (or so says the math, mph times implement width times 0.1212 equals xxx acres per hour) and i can cover 1 acre an hour with the disk, again at 4 mph. 

 

what is an ideal charge per hour?

 

for bigger plots, i might do a discount of charging by the acre.

 

thanks again! :wave:



#2 29 Chev ONLINE  

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Posted June 14, 2016 - 12:57 PM

Don't forget to calculate in other expenses such as oil, grease, and normal wear and tear on the tractor and equipment.  If you are transporting via a truck or trailer you may want to factor in a bit of money for insurance as well as making sure you are covered should your tractor spring an oil or fuel leak on another persons property.  Might sound trivial but in todays age you may want to check into it. You could also check and see if anyone else in your area is doing the same type of work and if so see what they are charging - just suggestions.


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#3 dthomp17 OFFLINE  

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Posted June 14, 2016 - 01:00 PM

Remember there are other expenses involved besides fuel such as belts, clutches, tires, etc. Around my area here in Georgia I see ads on Craigslist for tractor work for $50 to $75 per hour.  Most of the ads are for $50 am hour. If there is a lot of competition in you're area, that will impact the amount you can charge.  Hope that offers a little help.


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#4 chieffan ONLINE  

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Posted June 14, 2016 - 01:04 PM

I would not do any custom work on a  "piece size" rate.  You would have to measure every piece you did to get the acre size.  to much work for no return.  To much difference in the ground density, how rocky it is, etc.  Also how well the customer wants it done.  You may figure one cost for a once over size but he may want you to go over it a couple times to get it worked up the way he wants it as it is not costing him any more.  Do it strictly by the hour.  Myself, I would start my tractor for a job for less than $25/hr. USD.


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#5 Greasy6020 ONLINE  

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Posted June 14, 2016 - 01:11 PM

as i gather it, i should charge something close to $55 an hour canadian. i looked on kijiji for pricies its just a bunch of people doing weeding for $20 a garden. 

 

i might just put an ad up. 


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#6 Jazz ONLINE  

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Posted June 14, 2016 - 01:26 PM

as i gather it, i should charge something close to $55 an hour canadian. i looked on kijiji for pricies its just a bunch of people doing weeding for $20 a garden. 

 

i might just put an ad up. 

You don't want people knowing how much you make per hour. You could price the jobs as low as $40 and still earn a decent profit if the competition is that stiff. There were guys on kijiji this winter snow blowing driveways for $20! 


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#7 propane1 ONLINE  

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Posted June 14, 2016 - 03:01 PM

Most ads around my area don't say a price. That way the customer has to phone, and if it's someone else doing the same business trying to find out what every body else is charging, it's not as easy to do. You have to phone.

Noel
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#8 oldedeeres ONLINE  

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Posted June 14, 2016 - 03:32 PM

I would work by the hour, not the area. A neighbour here does custom work with a small dozer cat, and asks before he starts if you "just want the job done, or do you want it done right?" Charges the same amount by the hour, but a job "done right" is a beautiful thing to see, and well worth the extra time it took to do. And as you would expect, if you say you just want it done, he tells you to get someone else, he won't have his name associated with a less than perfect result. The man is never out of work. Establish your principles and work ethic right off the bat, and people will hire you. I think you're going at it the right way, figuring all the costs first, plus a little more for the unforeseen maintenance as a base, and then your worth in time and expertise. Good luck with your venture.
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#9 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted June 14, 2016 - 05:19 PM

A general rule of thumb that I learned 40 years ago and still makes sense: cost of the machine x 2 plus your hourly labor rate x 1.67 equals the rate that you should charge. An example: my big tractor(TLB) costs about $20 per hour(fuel, maintenance,and depreciation) x 2 = $40 per hr for the machine. I want $15 per hour for my labor x 1.67 = $25 per hour for labor. Labor plus machine = $65 per hour. Insurance and permits can add on to this. BTW in my area, a TLB is usually closer to $100 per hour.

You may need a contractors license and liability insurance. The cost of insurance put me out of business 16 years ago. Good Luck, Rick

Edited by boyscout862, June 15, 2016 - 07:02 AM.

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#10 toomanytoys84 ONLINE  

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Posted June 14, 2016 - 06:47 PM

That's a great equation! You could apply that for any type of work.

I tried to figure this out last year when I did some flooring installs and some other odd works for my wife's family friend who needed laminate floor put down. I just ended up using 2.50 a sq ft to hope she didn't want me to do it. And she was more than happy to pay.m

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#11 DH1 ONLINE  

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Posted June 14, 2016 - 07:09 PM

Don't forget that you have to get to the job with tractor and whatever else you need to do the job, maybe it's 5 min., away maybe it's 1hr away.


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#12 propane1 ONLINE  

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Posted June 15, 2016 - 08:43 AM

Here's an ad found on pei. He does say his price.

Noel

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#13 LilysDad ONLINE  

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Posted June 15, 2016 - 11:12 AM

A general rule of thumb that I learned 40 years ago and still makes sense: cost of the machine x 2 plus your hourly labor rate x 1.67 equals the rate that you should charge. An example: my big tractor(TLB) costs about $20 per hour(fuel, maintenance,and depreciation) x 2 = $40 per hr for the machine. I want $15 per hour for my labor x 1.67 = $25 per hour for labor. Labor plus machine = $65 per hour. Insurance and permits can add on to this. BTW in my area, a TLB is usually closer to $100 per hour.

 

I don't understand the X 1.67 for labor. If you want $25 for labor, why not just say so?


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#14 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted June 16, 2016 - 08:16 AM

I don't understand the X 1.67 for labor. If you want $25 for labor, why not just say so?

The 15$/hr is what you can put in your pocket. The other ten dollars will be taken by social security, income taxes, and medical costs. In engineering it is often a 2.5 factor because of liability insurance. Good Luck, Rick

 

To spend a dollar you usually have to earn alot more than a dollar(atleast 1.5 times). This is why doing it yourself can save alot.


Edited by boyscout862, June 16, 2016 - 08:18 AM.

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