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Better enjoy tinkering if you use old GT's.


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#1 rustyoldjunk OFFLINE  

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Posted May 28, 2016 - 07:46 PM

And I do on both counts. A good example is the Allis Chalmers 914 shuttle shift tractor that I recently drug home to mow with. It had been sitting outside but covered. It started up and drove but the linkages were rusty and sticky so it broke a shuttle linkage piece. I brought it home and replaced the linkage piece with one from a parts tractor (having parts is nice too),lubed and greased it. Pressure washed it and used cleaning wax on it to make it a little more presentable. I adjusted the shuttle and brake linkages while I was at it.

I mowed with it and the carb had serious issues including a severely worn throttle shaft,so I pulled a carb off the shelf,took it apart,cleaned it and put it on and replaced the gas line that was rotted. While I was at it I put the air cleaner backing plate on right so it didn't hit the hood. Someone had broken the backing plate and had to reposition it for it to work,so I put one of mine on.I'm also running Seafoam and Marvel Mystery oil in the gas for the first few tanks.

Took it out today for its second mow and knowing the K321 burned a fair amount of oil on the first mow (but hoping for maybe a stuck ring to free up but I don't think thats going to happen),I stopped twice to check the oil and all went well until I was almost done. I was mowing between the road and field behind our place when suddenly the tractor wouldn't go any more. I shut it off and raised the seat pan and worked the linkage and saw a set bolt had come out of the shuttle linkage. So a quick trip up to the garage and pulled the same set bolt out of the shuttle parts tractor took it back to the 914,put it in and back to driving and mowing like a champ.

Then when I finished,I parked the tractor in the yard and went in to see my wife who had just got home. I went out while later to put it up and noticed that the carb was loose and about to fall off(I must not have tightened it).

All these are just little bumps to me I enjoy tinkering,working on,and even putting these old tractors back together and making them run and drive again but I'm just saying if you like having and using old equipment you had better enjoy working on them too and having parts and parts tractors around is a big plus.

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Edited by rustyoldjunk, May 28, 2016 - 08:04 PM.

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#2 Bolens 1000 ONLINE  

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Posted May 28, 2016 - 08:08 PM

Theres just something about bringing back a machine to life in unknown condition or even if you know it hasn't ran in 20+ years.

For me its pure enjoyment and preserving history as well, I always get strange looks at the top of the road when I bring out the 1958 Bolens walkbehind with weed cutter attachment to cut by the side of the road :D

 

Having parts on hand is also enjoyable, before I got into this business my grandfather would stock about one of everything for the machines he owned so when something broke you would go to the parts shelf and get the part you needed, I followed this trend and thats maybe why I got into the parts business eventually as I enjoyed having parts on the shelf for my projects and repairs  :D


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#3 larrybl OFFLINE  

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Posted May 28, 2016 - 08:17 PM

Sorta the same, but when I rebuild a cira 78 - 88 I go for .... lack of a better term (perfection). This way when I put them to use I expect 20 more years before a major break down.


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#4 John Arsenault ONLINE  

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Posted May 28, 2016 - 08:22 PM

Sorta the same, but when I rebuild a cira 78 - 88 I go for .... lack of a better term (perfection). This way when I put them to use I expect 20 more years before a major break down.


Sorta the same but my tractors are from 1968 -1973 and I do full restores covering every nut and bolt. I expect mine to last another 30 years...lol
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#5 larrybl OFFLINE  

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Posted May 28, 2016 - 08:33 PM

Sounds like a new thread is needed, (Oldest restored machine that is still being used). :wave:


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#6 HANKG ONLINE  

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Posted May 28, 2016 - 08:37 PM

I have been quite lucky in my GT purchase's always seem to find a good runner, some I would buy even if they weren't good runner's my best find was a Bolens super RAM that had not run in years I replaced the coil for lack of spark pts. and condenser bought her a drink of high test and on the first pull she came to life, it is still one of my best running GTs . Another great find was a M-F EXEC 7 I bought from two old women that used it to cut their grass. It sat for some 20 years in their barn replaced coil pts. condenser it runs like a champ, but I do enjoy tinkering on all of them. My oldest Gt is the 57 RAM and arguably my Porter Cable second which could be earlier.

Edited by HANKG, May 28, 2016 - 08:42 PM.

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#7 classic ONLINE  

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Posted May 28, 2016 - 09:00 PM

Old machines that were kept indoors with low hours are the best buys. Most times you pay a little more initially, but it's well worth it. The heavily used machines and any machine left outdoors will give you the most headaches, or will end up being a costly restoration once you start tearing into it. Worn out machines are just that, worn out. Water ruins everything, so expect big problems with the machines kept outside. Generally, it costs quite a bit to restore basket cases, but an old machine fully gone through will last many years if properly maintained. Picking up obsolete spares and having parts machines are two big pluses. All in all, I would rather restore an older tractor than buy a new throw away tractor.
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#8 John Arsenault ONLINE  

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Posted May 28, 2016 - 09:33 PM

Sounds like a new thread is needed, (Oldest restored machine that is still being used). :wave:

 

 

Won't be any of mine , mine are just in the era before they started using plastic and fancy pieces that hold things together.


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#9 John Arsenault ONLINE  

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Posted May 28, 2016 - 09:35 PM

All in all, I would rather restore an older tractor than buy a new throw away tractor.



I have done it , already threw it away to !!
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#10 HANKG ONLINE  

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Posted May 28, 2016 - 09:59 PM

Old machines that were kept indoors with low hours are the best buys. Most times you pay a little more initially, but it's well worth it. The heavily used machines and any machine left outdoors will give you the most headaches, or will end up being a costly restoration once you start tearing into it. Worn out machines are just that, worn out. Water ruins everything, so expect big problems with the machines kept outside. Generally, it costs quite a bit to restore basket cases, but an old machine fully gone through will last many years if properly maintained. Picking up obsolete spares and having parts machines are two big pluses. All in all, I would rather restore an older tractor than buy a new throw away tractor.

That right there is sage advice, that cheap one you got isn't always so cheap in the long run..
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#11 rustyoldjunk OFFLINE  

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Posted May 28, 2016 - 10:02 PM

Old machines that were kept indoors with low hours are the best buys. Most times you pay a little more initially, but it's well worth it. The heavily used machines and any machine left outdoors will give you the most headaches, or will end up being a costly restoration once you start tearing into it. Worn out machines are just that, worn out. Water ruins everything, so expect big problems with the machines kept outside. Generally, it costs quite a bit to restore basket cases, but an old machine fully gone through will last many years if properly maintained. Picking up obsolete spares and having parts machines are two big pluses. All in all, I would rather restore an older tractor than buy a new throw away tractor.

I agree from a rustoration...uh...I meant restoration stand point BUT thats not what this thread is about. I don't do restorations,I like tractors in their original condition and I want to use them as a piece of equipment,not a trophy or show machine. My favorites are  the ones that I build from tractors left for junk. I like the worn out left out machines,they are the ones that most need put back into running and using condition again. If I want shiny and low wear I would buy a new throwaway every 3 years :poke: :smilewink: :D .


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#12 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted May 28, 2016 - 10:10 PM

I agree with fixing up old ones to get a better machine. I enjoy the resurrecting of all kinds of machines. Its a good thing that I consider it a hobby because I never made any money in it. I don't have any trailer queens but someday I hope to turn a Magna Trak into one. One of the problems that I see is that there seems to be fewer people that can work on the old equipment. I think that this may make the value go down on the old stuff now that scrap isn't worth much. Good Luck, Rick


Edited by boyscout862, May 28, 2016 - 10:14 PM.

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#13 rustyoldjunk OFFLINE  

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Posted May 28, 2016 - 10:17 PM

That right there is sage advice, that cheap one you got isn't always so cheap in the long run..

Hank after over 20 years and a few hundred tractors I think I have gotten pretty good at doing it old school. No rookie here....just sayin'..... :D.....The few hundred tractors ? I used to buy sell trade and repair locally and had a eBay thing going at one time...But like Waylon said,I don't do that no more....


Edited by rustyoldjunk, May 29, 2016 - 12:26 AM.

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#14 classic ONLINE  

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Posted May 28, 2016 - 11:41 PM

I see what you are saying Rusty, just putting my opinion out there for anyone that reads this thread. The Allis Big Ten that I mow with is made up from three tractors and is as reliable as a new one. I did go over it real good and it will last quite a while, I'm sure. None of my machines have been fully restored yet, but I'm working on three complete resto jobs. The thread is about expecting to have to tinker when using these old machines. What I have found is that these old machines need less tinkering on a regular basis if completely gone over. The '56 PK I'm restoring will be a machine that I will rely on heavily for plowing snow and hauling firewood. I could have tossed a good running engine in it, cleaned it up a bit, then repaired/replaced the worn stuff as it broke. I just don't want to have to tinker when the machine goes down while plowing the driveway or hauling a load of wood out. It's a good thing I completely tore the tractor down. I found a cracked bull gear in the rear, cracked rear end housing, rust damaged bearings, leaky seals, bad brakes, worn steering, worn crankshaft, and a multitude of other things. I knew that this would be a bit of a project to get going, but I didn't expect to find some of the things I came across after tearing it down. Many of these things would would have created a slew of tinkering sessions while trying to get work done. We do get lucky sometimes and come across an old machine that was rarely used and well taken care of.
Don't get me wrong on tinkering, since I enjoy the heck out of it. If it's 15° and an old worn part gives up while plowing, tinkering ain't so much fun.
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#15 rustyoldjunk OFFLINE  

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Posted May 29, 2016 - 12:23 AM

Wow somebody thought your PK was a full fledged dozer at some point,it sounds like.I here what you are saying and agree for the most part. I give everything a pretty good going over when I put one together and usually have a pretty good idea of the condition of the components. If things are broke of worn I replace them. This tractor isn't one that I put together though. I just gave it a service and replaced a few items. I know where this tractor has been the last several years. One nice thing is I think this tractor has ever done anything except mow. There is no rear lift and no evidence that it ever had one and it doesn't appear to have ever had a snow/plow installed. The paint isn't even scratched at the drawbar. I think it is a high hour tractor but I don't think it was abused. An engine swap is quick and easy if need be and I have a spare hydro rear waiting to go in if needed. And if it were to go down I will just slide the deck under the 917 hydro that I pretty much built from parts.


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