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Removing a flange bearing with locking collar from a shaft


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#1 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted May 27, 2016 - 06:56 AM

Hi folks

 

 Just started work on a JD 49 snow thrower. The bearing on the shaft from the angle GB to the chain drive sprocket is totally shot. I've never dealt with one of these flange bearings with the locking collar. I got the rusted up collar to move by using vice grips to turn it. The problem is, the bearing is at the welded on sprocket end of the 18" long shaft. The shaft is rusted up and to move the bearing all the way to the other end for removal is going to be no fun. I wire wheeled a short portion of the shaft and got it to move about an inch with a fair  amount of pounding. It's too far from the end of the shaft for my puller. I thought of turning the shaft somehow and sanding it smooth again. It's 3/4" diameter and my drill press chuck is 5/8" so that's out. It's too long to fit in my mini lathe. I may have to come up with an adapter of  some kind to fit it into the drill press. Any suggestions?

 

 


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#2 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted May 27, 2016 - 07:02 AM

A roll of Emory cloth maybe?


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#3 chieffan ONLINE  

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Posted May 27, 2016 - 07:14 AM

Cut the sprocket off, replace the bearing and weld the sprocket back on.  A good welding shop could handle that job for you.  I realize your trying to save $$ and do the job yourself and there is nothing wrong with that.  I do the same thing.  But when I know I am in over my head i drive 8 miles to the welding shop and say "Thom, I have a problem."


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#4 DougT ONLINE  

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Posted May 27, 2016 - 07:20 AM

The wire wheel followed by the emory like Kenny suggested or a flapper wheel in an angle grinder. I would cut the old bearing off and then you only have to get the new one on.


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#5 crittersf1 OFFLINE  

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Posted May 27, 2016 - 07:42 AM

The wire wheel followed by the emory like Kenny suggested or a flapper wheel in an angle grinder. I would cut the old bearing off and then you only have to get the new one on.



#6 WNYTractorTinkerer ONLINE  

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Posted May 27, 2016 - 07:42 AM

Lock collar bearings are released using two pipe wrenches..  Remove /loosen the collar set-screws and place one pipe wrench on the shaft and the other on the collar..  Give the one on the collar a whack with a hammer and it should pop free and the bearing should slide right off the shaft unless it's extremely rusted up..  Good Luck.. 


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#7 29 Chev ONLINE  

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Posted May 27, 2016 - 08:56 AM

It sounds like the shaft is rusted and marked up enough that the bearing will bind all the way unless you get rid of the rust.  I assume that you have turned the locking collar a bit and separated it from the bearing so that the collar is still not trying to lock the bearing - sounds like it is a 2 piece design.  You could get a 2" 36 grit roloc disc and the arbour that holds it (usually has a 1/4" mandrel) and chuck the mandrel in a 3/8" drill and remove the rust that way.  Do a short length of the shaft, turn the shaft a little bit and clean another length - it will take a few minutes but should clean it up fairly quickly and grind off any burrs which a wire brush usually does not do much to - as suggested a flap wheel on a grinder will do the same thing but I find can be a little harder to control. Clean up a short section of the shaft near the bearing first and you should be able to slide the bearing over that section by hand and once it starts moving you can do another short area and work on any spots where the bearing binds until it slides over that section - just remove enough material so you can move the bearing and be gentle on any areas where the shaft makes contact with any other bearings or hubs so they remain a snug fit when everything is reassembled. 


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#8 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted May 27, 2016 - 04:30 PM

Can you get a Nut Buster on the collar? might break it to get it off? You would still need to polish the shaft to get a new one on.

It should be hard enough to break easily, with an air chisel?


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#9 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted May 27, 2016 - 07:25 PM

I use acetylene torch to cut the old bearings off shafts.  With a steady hand you can cut off all traces of the bearing and not touch the shaft at all.  Then use a flapper wheel to clean up the shaft.

  Surely a welding shop would torch off the bearing for just a couple bucks, then clean the shaft your self.


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#10 Lauber1 OFFLINE  

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Posted May 27, 2016 - 10:11 PM

I use acetylene torch to cut the old bearings off shafts.  With a steady hand you can cut off all traces of the bearing and not touch the shaft at all.  Then use a flapper wheel to clean up the shaft.

  Surely a welding shop would torch off the bearing for just a couple bucks, then clean the shaft your self.

yep do it that way at work all the time. youll do more damage to the shaft trying to get the junk bearing off. I wack them with a hammer and break off the outer race then you only have the inner part to shave off with the torch.


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#11 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted May 28, 2016 - 04:36 AM

I don't have a torch, but if I get it down to the inner race, I'll cut most of the way through with and angle grinder. Then whack it with a chisel. Usually breaks and loosens enough to get it off.


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#12 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted May 31, 2016 - 05:31 AM

Had more trouble getting the rotor bearings off. One of the collars had no set screw in it and it didn't look like it was straight on the shaft. It turns out it was jammed on there with a broken piece of the bearing part of the lock flange jammed in the collar groove. It took me a while to get that sheared off piece of the bearing out of the collar. Once it was out of there the collar came off easy. I think the PO had a shot at fixing the thrower before he put it for sale. I say this because the drive sprocket set screw was loose, the bearing flange bolts were loose and the set screw was missing on the collar. Both rotor bearings are shot along with the bearing on the chain drive shaft. With the thrower were printed off sheets of the parts lists with some of the worn parts ticked off on the list and the phone number of his local JD dealer.

  I'm going to see if I can find the bearings locally today. If not, I'll try the JD dealer.


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