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#1 jrbublitz1 OFFLINE  

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Posted May 24, 2016 - 07:02 AM

Behind our house we have a patch of brush with a few trees scattered around. I'd like to thin this out to just the trees and the wife wants to use part of the area for gardening. The question I have is how do I go about this?uploadfromtaptalk1464091292673.jpg
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#2 David Brown OFFLINE  

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Posted May 24, 2016 - 07:10 AM

I assume you are talking about the patch that is directly behind the two trees in the picture?  There are a number of things you could do but there's no substitution for getting down and pulling the brush out by the roots.  It's slow, it's terrible but it's the best way to have success if you want to put any kind of garden in.  Be sure not to put the garden too close to the trees.  It will need the sun and you don't need the trees stealing water from the plants.  Once you have everything pulled, either till it or plow it up and see what you have.  You may have to go rock picking as well.  It will take a couple of years of planting to get the garden established.  That's not to say you'll get nothing out of it the first year, it will just get better as time goes on.


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#3 chieffan OFFLINE  

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Posted May 24, 2016 - 07:32 AM

Gardens need sun and it looks like you only have one open side for the sun to get in.  Slope looks fairly steep also so could have a washing problem in hard rains.  I would look for a flatter area, out in the open more.  Just my suggestion.


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#4 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted May 24, 2016 - 10:07 AM

WHAT kind of trees are in there? You will not want a garden near walnut trees.

You have a lot of fall where the brush is, and it is holding back a gully.
To plant a garden in there you would almost have to terrace it from north to south as it lays in the picture.
It can be done, but will require work.
As a kid I lived next to a retired Vetrinarian who was an avid gardener.
His garden was on a steeper hill than yours and it was all terraced. one of the prettiest gardens I have seen.
My property is all one big hill and I have been working on ways to lay the garden out to prevent washing.
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#5 jrbublitz1 OFFLINE  

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Posted May 24, 2016 - 11:55 AM

I'm not sure on the type of trees in there yet.

If we did any gardening in there they would likely be raised beds so we would be building up the ground underneath. I'm thinking that would help with any washout troubles. And we also wouldn't need to work the ground. Farther down the hill (actually at the edge of the picture) is cleared out and fairly flat already.

What I was having trouble figuring out was what David Brown brought up. How do you get rid of the plants? Dig em out? Go through with a brush mower? Kill em with spray?

One thing to mention is our soil is very sandy (like sandbox sandy) which was another reason for the raised bed garden.

#6 David Brown OFFLINE  

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Posted May 24, 2016 - 12:03 PM

I'm not sure on the type of trees in there yet.

If we did any gardening in there they would likely be raised beds so we would be building up the ground underneath. I'm thinking that would help with any washout troubles. And we also wouldn't need to work the ground. Farther down the hill (actually at the edge of the picture) is cleared out and fairly flat already.

What I was having trouble figuring out was what David Brown brought up. How do you get rid of the plants? Dig em out? Go through with a brush mower? Kill em with spray?

One thing to mention is our soil is very sandy (like sandbox sandy) which was another reason for the raised bed garden.

What I was trying to get across is that the larger brush should be simply pulled out, making sure the roots come with it, otherwise they come back in no time.  If you are going raised beds, you could pull the big stuff out and mow the rest.  I would get some Roundup and spray the areas where you want the raised beds.  Just to kill off any other vegetation that could come up through the beds.  If your soil is sandy, then this stuff might come out without much effort.  If it doesn't, I usually employ a maddock to get down to the roots and dig them out.  This job just got easier when you mentioned the raised beds.


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#7 jrbublitz1 OFFLINE  

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Posted May 24, 2016 - 08:22 PM

Thanks for the input guys. Picked up a mattock on my way home tonight.

The area we live in is pretty heavily wooded. We can either go behind the house where I'm looking right now or in front of the house. Wife wants to some flower gardens out front though.

Now we'll just need to keep the critters out once we get things set up.

#8 lyall ONLINE  

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Posted May 24, 2016 - 08:51 PM

for the larger trees a chain saw, then to remove the stumps a back hoe



#9 JBRamsey OFFLINE  

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Posted May 24, 2016 - 09:51 PM

Axe. Mattock. Loppers. Shovel. Chainsaw. Blisters. Lots of time. Pile it all up. Let it dry for a few months. Light it up in a good slow rain.

If you have a subsoiler, rip the ground up and pick all of the roots and rocks out that you see. Every time it rains, go rock mining and throw them onto the neighbor's property. Use the good sized rocks to slow the runoff down. Get in the habit of throwing rocks out every time you are near it.

Overseed it this fall with winter wheat or rye to help hold it and give you some green manure for the soil.

I found that a Model 700 does a good job of keeping unwanted critters at bay. A 13, 15 and 17 year old with Gamos keep the smaller ones in check.
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#10 jrbublitz1 OFFLINE  

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Posted May 25, 2016 - 09:59 AM

Thanks again for the input guys. I think this is going to keep me busy for most of the summer.

No subsoiler at the moment. I'm
not sure though either if I want o work up the ground as there are a few trees in there I'd like to leave if I can.

No model 700 at the moment, or anything of the sort. Wife and I do have our own bows though :)

Here is what things look like farther down the hill. I'll have to remember to update this with my progress.
uploadfromtaptalk1464188292812.jpg
uploadfromtaptalk1464188282750.jpg

Edited by jrbublitz1, May 25, 2016 - 10:03 AM.


#11 WoodyChuck OFFLINE  

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Posted May 25, 2016 - 11:02 AM

Easiest way is get a tractor with a bucket on the front and have at it. But if that's not an option use a quad or tractor and a cable, rope or chain. Wrap the cable around some brush and pull it out in sections.

#12 WoodyChuck OFFLINE  

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Posted May 25, 2016 - 11:05 AM

You can get it by the roots but you must wrap the rope around the base of the brush or as close to the ground as u can get. Those small trees 1 1/2 inch around should pull out

#13 jrbublitz1 OFFLINE  

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Posted May 25, 2016 - 07:41 PM

No loader tractor right now. Do have an atv that may handle small stuff.

Edited by jrbublitz1, May 25, 2016 - 07:41 PM.


#14 WoodyChuck OFFLINE  

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Posted May 26, 2016 - 08:47 AM

[quote name="jrbublitz1" post="684867" timestamp="1464223267"]No loader tractor right now. Do have an atv that may handle small stuff.

Atv should work great make sure u pull everything going down hill to make it easier

#15 Greasy6020 OFFLINE  

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Posted May 30, 2016 - 01:01 PM

No loader tractor right now. Do have an atv that may handle small stuff.

 

maybe pick up a piece of stout chain, and loop it around the bottom and pull with quad in 4x4 low, low gear... should be able to do it.

 

if not find a decent gt with gear drive, put it in granny gear, pull... 

 

best rig ive ever seen for clearing brush was my dads skid steer and manure fork/grapple. grab root ball, shake by rolling bucket fast in both directions, dump brush off in pile, and like someone else said, light it up in a slow rain. 






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