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Planting long term garden crops


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#1 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted May 10, 2011 - 07:34 AM

About a month ago, a friend gave me about 15 Horseraddish roots, they are planted and doing very well. My Dad gave me three asparagus crowns, with more on the way. They are also planted and 1may not make it, we'll see.

In either case, it will be next year before I can taste the results, but I will try to be patient.

Are there any other long term crops I should be considering? What else do you guys plant or have experience with?

#2 tractorgarden OFFLINE  

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Posted May 10, 2011 - 08:05 AM

Chives, Rhubarb, leeks, Jerusalem artichokes, hope this helps. Shawn

#3 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted May 10, 2011 - 08:07 AM

Well along with the Asparagus & Horseradish planted this spring, we put in some leeks and I understand they can be thinned and the balance left as a perrenial. They are one of those things that are Gawd-Awful expensive in the store, and there is no good reason for that. I believe thay can be done as a fall planted crop for next years use.
The Garlic can be done the same way, though I'm not sure I planted enough. My wife uses a lot of garlic and I may have to pull what we grow this summer and do a fall planting for next year. I'm not sure my wife could cook at all if she did not have onions and garlic?
Some of the Herbs can be planted as perennials too, though that might take some research. I know the wife plans to transplant some to pots and grow the through the winter inside this fall.

#4 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted May 10, 2011 - 08:25 AM

I don't have a lot of flat areas in my yard and made the mistake of planting a row of grapes 30' and a row of berries there . :wallbanging: Now I want to make the garden a little bigger and will need to move at least the berries onto a slope section.

#5 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted May 10, 2011 - 08:59 AM

Chives, Rhubarb, leeks, Jerusalem artichokes, hope this helps. Shawn


Chives and leeks I understand, didn't know rhubarb would survive the winter. Had to google Jerusalem Artichokes. Are they any good?

#6 daytime dave OFFLINE  

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Posted May 10, 2011 - 10:16 AM

Rhubarb is very hearty. It will take a year or so to get bigger, but after that, big yields every year.

#7 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted May 10, 2011 - 01:28 PM

Rhubarb is very hearty. It will take a year or so to get bigger, but after that, big yields every year.


Yes once you get a bed started you almost can't kill it off. I've seen it come up in cornfields where the farmstead was bulldozed off 20 yrs ago.

The only reason I don't have it is my wife does not like it and won't fix it.

#8 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted May 10, 2011 - 01:29 PM

I don't have a lot of flat areas in my yard and made the mistake of planting a row of grapes 30' and a row of berries there . :wallbanging: Now I want to make the garden a little bigger and will need to move at least the berries onto a slope section.


I can relate to that, there is not a flat spot on my place. everything is planted on a slope.
The Berries and grapes will do fine on a slope. Have you seen pictures of the mountainside vinyards in Europe?
I often wonder if those people have one leg shorter than the other from running on those ridges?

#9 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted May 10, 2011 - 08:16 PM

Another thing I didn't do right was the first asparagus bed was a block pattern , wasn't in very good soil , got very hard when it dried out , impossible to weed , then to make things worst the little trees 20' away grew up and sent roots into the bed . The new bed is in a different location ,made then in a long row and plowed as deep as I could ,mixed old wood chips then planted . That was 3 years ago and it's paying off this year with a nice crop.

#10 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted May 11, 2011 - 11:35 AM

Jury is still out on my asparagus patch? It was not planted in the best soild. A lot of clay in that spot.
Just moved into this place in December, so no compost yet and no chance to geta lot of organic matter incorporated.

#11 wvbuzzmaster OFFLINE  

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Posted May 11, 2011 - 01:31 PM

Long term crops would have to be planted away from seasonal crops to avoid plowing and tilling them, right? Or would it matter with some of them? Just asking for future reference lol.

#12 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted May 11, 2011 - 04:17 PM

It all depends on how much space you have. But yes I would want them in a separate area since you don;t till them every year.
The farm field I'm working had a Large radius curve around the yard. I squared it off and planted the permanent beds for asparagus horse radish etc in that area. That said if your limited for space plant them wherever you have room.
The wife and I debated putting blueberries in the flower garden border in front of the house. Before I planted them out in the field next to the Blackberries.

#13 grand OFFLINE  

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Posted May 14, 2011 - 09:40 PM

About a month ago, a friend gave me about 15 Horseraddish roots, they are planted and doing very well. My Dad gave me three asparagus crowns, with more on the way. They are also planted and 1may not make it, we'll see.

In either case, it will be next year before I can taste the results, but I will try to be patient.

Are there any other long term crops I should be considering? What else do you guys plant or have experience with?

We are still new at gardening and trying to learn. I ordered some plants online which were sent at the time that they should have been planted, but the rain in our area just would not stop. The asparagus instructions said that it may take up to 5 years to harvest. The good news was that once planted, the plants were productive for quite a few years. We unfortunately didn't get them planted in time. I hope you do better with yours.

#14 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted May 14, 2011 - 11:21 PM

We are still new at gardening and trying to learn. I ordered some plants online which were sent at the time that they should have been planted, but the rain in our area just would not stop. The asparagus instructions said that it may take up to 5 years to harvest. The good news was that once planted, the plants were productive for quite a few years. We unfortunately didn't get them planted in time. I hope you do better with yours.


Sorry to hear it, mine are in and turning green. I figure next year there will be creamed asparagus in my life :D

#15 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted May 15, 2011 - 09:16 AM

I'm not sure if you know about how they want the asparagus to be picked the first few years . Some don't want you to pick any this year , only a few next 2 years , and after that it's OK to pick them all. That said my neighbor planted some last year and has picked EVERY one that came up this year !!! Here's the ones I planted 2 years ago , I been picking the biggest ones and left the pencil size ones to keep growing.The strawberry bed is to the right of them.P1080034.jpg




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