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You might be from a small town if . . .


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#16 MiCarl ONLINE  

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Posted May 10, 2016 - 09:21 PM

Great stories.  I grew up the next generation in our town so while I didn't do most of those things my mother, aunts and uncles did.  A shame so many are so far removed from that life style.

 

A little bit about my town:

 

Much larger than you describe, about 10,000 population.  About half the people were from six or so families so you could find out that girl you had a crush on was a 2nd cousin.

 

When there was a fire the siren in the town center would go off and the men would leave the fields to fight the fire.  If the siren sounded on Thanksgiving our house would empty out because my uncles and older cousins were the volunteer fire department.


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#17 Eric OFFLINE  

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Posted May 10, 2016 - 09:46 PM

our DMV is also a A&W true story! This small town is what this country was made of and what it is missing and dragging it down. I have been all over the world and what I have learned is that the places that exist in the way we are talking about here are the last pockets of true happines that I have come across, for me and the people that live in them. Our children have been taught to seek out that mighty dollar and a pristine community built to look like the track homes we all despise in search of what we call the american dream. What they failed to see was that it was not a dream, generations of us had already created and lived it but it was just to slow and familiar for them to want to stay. I guess what I am saying is that all is not lost we just need to show them that a good life is not that far from where they started and it is a lot easier to achieve than anyone thought! Sorry for the rant I am just a bit blue.
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#18 ducky OFFLINE  

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Posted May 10, 2016 - 09:46 PM

This is a great thread!

 

I can remember when it was more fun to ride in the back of the truck, when the only back was the bed.  Oh and it was not against the law.


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#19 MFDAC ONLINE  

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Posted May 10, 2016 - 09:47 PM

Out here the farming isn't as big of a deal as east, the thing that brings a lot of folks together is branding since it's cattle country. That is going on in a big way right now. Mining was the biggest deal just to the west but that has died off to just 1 or 2 operating gold mines now.

 

DAC


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#20 ducky OFFLINE  

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Posted May 10, 2016 - 10:01 PM

Got to share this one.

A friend of mine told that his dad, a farmer, once told him, "We may not be rich but why would we what to go and live in a camper all weekend like we are poor"


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#21 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted May 10, 2016 - 10:04 PM

I still live there.
At 11pm, our only stoplight goes to blinky mode

The HS and Elementry School are 1 mile apart... Because that's where the farmland was that was donated.

Every year, a kid gets in trouble somehow and they choose between "X" and community service... Of re-painting all the yellow curbs

The statement "Aaron, settle down and go home before I call your dad" holds enough weight to keep a kid out of trouble.

The borough building and the firehall share a roof.

The Fire Department is one of the three social points in town... It's also where you vote and where half the wedding receptions are held.

7-12 grade school has less than 500 kids.

I've seen tractors in the parking lot at the school.

Teenage pregnancy or drug abuse is still a scandal.

Every organization in town helped raise money for the new town library

The fairgrounds are actually owned & maintained by three different organizations.

Kids still skip rocks on the creek

It's very rare to see shoes on power lines

A "Spell" is still a measurement of either distance or time, depending on usage.
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#22 Eric OFFLINE  

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Posted May 10, 2016 - 10:11 PM

I have almost never had a visitor that drove up in a car most are on an ATV and some tractors, even had an allis chalmers H3 dozer come up the drive a few times.
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#23 oldedeeres ONLINE  

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Posted May 11, 2016 - 01:06 AM

That kind of small town is the place, where, when you are sick with the mumps and can't come out to play, the neighbourhood kids ask your mom if Buddy, (your dog), can come and play anyway. True story!
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#24 skyrydr2 ONLINE  

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Posted May 11, 2016 - 03:37 AM

Those were the days...I grew up on a small self sustaining farm, we farmed to eat and stay alive, not for profit. Dad owned an excavating business... That didn't make it when the crash hit in '73..
Those were tough times... and we did better than most, still never had much, but we had good eats and a warm place to rest. I resented this until i saw how the "city folk" were doing... That changed my entire outlook on life and i vowed NEVER EVER WOULD I LIVE LIKE THAT! And never did or will, because i know how to grow food, and build what ever i need .. And im trying like hell to teach my kids the same, and it is harder than ....... To do this in today's world....of welfare.... and gimmeee gimmmee gimmeee.... Man, how i miss the good ol days..

Edited by skyrydr2, May 11, 2016 - 03:37 AM.

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#25 KC9KAS OFFLINE  

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Posted May 11, 2016 - 04:03 AM

This thread brought back a lot of memories!

:thank_you:


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#26 crittersf1 ONLINE  

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Posted May 11, 2016 - 08:23 AM

Sadly, those days are gone forever


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#27 hamman ONLINE  

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Posted May 11, 2016 - 08:52 AM

Sadly, those days are gone forever

Those day are gone, however if we instill in our kids and grand kids the importance of those times and the positive impact they had on our lives , they may just forget about the busy, technological future and pass along to their kids the values of our time. We could always hope. We had a conversation last night , wife, son and I. Our son is 26 and he still loves hearing about the " good old days " as he calls it.  I hope this thread keeps going, with each post I remember things that I had forgotten.

 

 

 

..... I f you took a large cardboard box and used it to slide down a grassy steep hill in July , you might be from a small town

 

 

.... if your fire department sounded the siren at 9 or 10 pm to let you know it was time to go in

 

 

.... if your fire department is staffed by the barber, florist, carpenter, mill worker, mechanic, car salesman, HVAC tec., and many many more volunteers you are lucky to live in a small town !


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#28 crittersf1 ONLINE  

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Posted May 11, 2016 - 08:56 AM

You knew when it got dark that you'd better be home. Watched "Gunsmoke" and "All in the Family" on Friday night.


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#29 Eric OFFLINE  

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Posted May 11, 2016 - 10:25 AM

The good old days do not have to be over we all just need to stop trying to fix everyone elses major problems and focus on our own communities. Global economy is the word that killed the good old days and brought us all the wonderfull charities that dig wells in Africa and afford their board of dirrectors a multi million dollar home, come on how much does that shovel cost. Never been so sad as when you watch the supplies you deliver be taken buy a guy with a gun so he can sell said supplies to buy another gun, charity you say! Look to the past to solve future problems, the country is not for everyone but the rest could sure learn alot from those of us that can live like we do.
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#30 toppop52 ONLINE  

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Posted May 11, 2016 - 11:05 AM

We went to the river for parties.

No Dairy Queen for us. We had a Bantam Chef. All the tables were outside.

The closest fast food was in the next town--20 miles away--on the other side of the river.

People with brick houses were rich. People with concrete driveways were really rich.

Christmas trees were cedar trees you found in the woods or along fence rows.

A bowl of pinto beans with cornbread and chowchow was a meal.

If you wanted fish for dinner on Saturday night, you went fishing on Friday night.

My PawPaw taught me to keep a fishing rod, .22, a roll of toilet paper and a fifth of bourbon behind the truck seat. No matter what you got into, one or more of those things would be handy to have around.

We also went to church three times a week--Sunday morning, Sunday night and Wednesday night. Fifth Sundays were for singing and potluck. Fifth Wednesday's was family night at church.

We had a harmless town drunk and a Singing Lenny that everyone looked out for.

If someone's grass got too tall, you stopped and checked on them instead of calling the HOA Nazis.

And I didn't know I grew up poor until I went to college.

I grew up in northeastern NC, South Mills, in the 50's and 60's, left in the early 70's. We didn't have a stoplight, called the deputy sheriff, Deputy Dog. Swam in the Dismal Swamp canal and local ponds, ate grapes and blackberries off the local vines. Everyone's mom was your mom too and you'd better treat her that way. Had a charge account at the local country store, pretty much heaven!


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