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Help! Amp Meter 6 or 12 volt?


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#1 DanO OFFLINE  

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Posted May 09, 2011 - 01:08 PM

Very Frustrating!!! I have spent the last 48 hours looking on more Forum sites than you can believe with what I thought was a very simple question but I have found constant contradicting statements from countless guys who will Swear they are Right!! Well, Someone has to be wrong!!!
I am looking to install a new Amp meter on my 1953 Farmall Super A tractor. It is all original, 6 Volt Positive Ground, with magneto Ignition.
Simple Question: Does it has to be a 6 Volt Amp Meter or will a Meter that says for 12 volt use work just the same?

Can anyone here give me a 100% absolute answer?

#2 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted May 09, 2011 - 01:17 PM

I will throw my .02 in the mix, I think it would work but I don't think it would give an accurate reading.
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#3 Texas Deere and Horse OFFLINE  

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Posted May 09, 2011 - 01:49 PM

DanO,
I asked my Electrian here at my shop. He says that it depends on the type of Amp gauge you get. It will show one of 2 readings, it will either show correct amps, or it will read 1/2 the correct Amps. If you use the style that has a "C" and "D", charge or discharge, then it wouldn't matter if it read the right amount of Amps.
Sorry I couldn't be more help.
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#4 ducky OFFLINE  

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Posted May 09, 2011 - 02:09 PM

PS
I should add that you will want to choose a meter with a high enough scale.
A 6 volt load will consume twice the amperage as a 12 volt load to produce the same Power - Kilowatts
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#5 DH1 ONLINE  

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Posted May 09, 2011 - 05:34 PM

Won't make any difference, never heard of a 6volt or 12volt amp meter.

-Amp meter measures current through it, the more current the higher the reading, reverse the flow(polarity) and the reading will be opposite but the same amount, eg 10amps+, 10amps-.

-Volt meter measures the difference between 2 points, battery positive terminal and battery negative terminal, more difference, higher reading more volts.

As said earlier a 6volt system will have about double the amps of a 12volt system.
Why-- VOLTS x AMPS = WATTS -- Power is watts
So to get the same power(watts).
12 volts x 10 amps =120 watts
6 volts x 20 amps =120 watts

So the same amp meter used on a 12volt verses a 6volt will show 2x the amps that a 12volt does for the same power load (watts).
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#6 DanO OFFLINE  

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Posted May 09, 2011 - 07:14 PM

Thanks Guys for your input on this. I understand what a amp meter does but It just amazes me how so many guys on so many Forums can disagree about this, that is why I was sceptical about the difference. They do definitely sell amp meters that specify that they are for either 6 or 12 volt I seen them on line & on ebay, & so that just added to my curiousity & questioning of it.
I found out that the original meter was a -20 0 +20 Gauge, so I'm gonna try to get one that has the same range.

#7 ducky OFFLINE  

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Posted May 09, 2011 - 08:15 PM

DH1 hit it right on the head.
Hope GT got you the info you need.

#8 caseguy OFFLINE  

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Posted May 09, 2011 - 08:55 PM

...They do definitely sell amp meters that specify that they are for either 6 or 12 volt I seen them on line & on ebay, & so that just added to my curiousity & questioning of it....


The ones made for a 6 volt system would simply handle a higher current load! Using one that specifies a 12 volt system might get cooked in short order. Amps is amps regardless of the voltage.

#9 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted May 09, 2011 - 10:50 PM

A lot of the switches we used to carry were either 6v or 12v... even tho there wasn't any difference in the switch itself the internal LIGHT was 6 or 12. It's possible they are differentiating the two, because they don't think people can change a backlight.

#10 wvbuzzmaster OFFLINE  

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Posted May 10, 2011 - 01:11 AM

A lot of the switches we used to carry were either 6v or 12v... even tho there wasn't any difference in the switch itself the internal LIGHT was 6 or 12. It's possible they are differentiating the two, because they don't think people can change a backlight.


Alan, remind me to change the bulb in the light I am using in the alternator circuit on the Caterpillar, it is for 120 volts lol. I personally don't think it make a difference with light bulbs unless it is rated for less voltage than you plan to put to it. It is like an electric motor, it will work at any voltage but when you exceed the rated voltage you risk burning it up. When using AC parts for DC applications derate the AC voltage rating by half or more for the DC voltage rating it is good for. This electric stuff is simple when you figure out all the little tricks involved to make things work.




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