Jump to content

Nominations for Tractor of the Month
Garden Tractors and Parts on eBay



Photo
- - - - -

ANZAC Day


  • Please log in to reply
17 replies to this topic

#1 holdenboy1960 OFFLINE  

holdenboy1960
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 62113
  • 1,472 Thanks
  • 819 posts
  • Location: Queensland , Australia

Posted April 24, 2016 - 10:36 AM

Lest we Forget all the Diggers and all the Armed Forces from near & afar that fought to keep our Countries Free , this Day in Remembrance 25/04/2016 in Australia & New Zealand 

 

  Advance Australia Fair - Gallipoli 2015 Dawn Service - ANZAC Cove - YouTube

 

don't know how to post a youtube otherwise , sorry every 1 


  • MH81, Alc, KennyP and 6 others have said thanks

#2 boyscout862 OFFLINE  

boyscout862
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 8923
  • 9,772 Thanks
  • 7,538 posts
  • Location: N.E. Connecticut

Posted April 24, 2016 - 10:44 AM

Gallipoli was Churchill's debacle. Ill concieved and even more poorly run. The British Admirals and Generals really didn't care about wasting "Colonials" The ANZACS distinguished themselves as brave and tough fighters and the British leaders showed how incompetent their military leadership was. The good thing that came out of this is that the colonials afterward withheld many of the command priveleges from the British Generals in WWII. Good Luck, Rick


  • KennyP, oldedeeres, toppop52 and 2 others have said thanks

#3 Bolens800uk OFFLINE  

Bolens800uk
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 63893
  • 1,165 Thanks
  • 919 posts
  • Location: Devon, England

Posted April 24, 2016 - 11:02 AM

Gallipoli was Churchill's debacle. Ill concieved and even more poorly run. The British Admirals and Generals really didn't care about wasting "Colonials" The ANZACS distinguished themselves as brave and tough fighters and the British leaders showed how incompetent their military leadership was. The good thing that came out of this is that the colonials afterward withheld many of the command priveleges from the British Generals in WWII. Good Luck, Rick


The bungling of the British High Command, frequented by ex Etonians and ex Harrowians, led to a lot of needless deaths of both British and Colonial Troops in both World Wars. My wife's grandfather's youngest brother was just 16 when he died at the Battle of the Somme. On my family side, my grandfather's brother was captured at the Fall of Singapore and died in Japanese captivity. Both of these milestone battles came about due to the befuddlement and incompetence of the British High Command.

As holdenboy1960's post: we should never forget the Fallen during both World Wars.
  • KennyP, boyscout862, oldedeeres and 2 others have said thanks

#4 holdenboy1960 OFFLINE  

holdenboy1960
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 62113
  • 1,472 Thanks
  • 819 posts
  • Location: Queensland , Australia

Posted April 24, 2016 - 11:42 AM

The English Leaders never had a clue , nor did they care about other forces at any rate , but thank you guys you both said it better than i ever could 


  • boyscout862, oldedeeres, toppop52 and 1 other said thanks

#5 boyscout862 OFFLINE  

boyscout862
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 8923
  • 9,772 Thanks
  • 7,538 posts
  • Location: N.E. Connecticut

Posted April 24, 2016 - 03:03 PM

The bungling of the British High Command, frequented by ex Etonians and ex Harrowians, led to a lot of needless deaths of both British and Colonial Troops in both World Wars. My wife's grandfather's youngest brother was just 16 when he died at the Battle of the Somme. On my family side, my grandfather's brother was captured at the Fall of Singapore and died in Japanese captivity. Both of these milestone battles came about due to the befuddlement and incompetence of the British High Command.

As holdenboy1960's post: we should never forget the Fallen during both World Wars.

As a veteran, I hope that all of our countries have learned not to waste the lives of our young people. Enough said!


  • KennyP, oldedeeres, toppop52 and 2 others have said thanks

#6 Bolens800uk OFFLINE  

Bolens800uk
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 63893
  • 1,165 Thanks
  • 919 posts
  • Location: Devon, England

Posted April 24, 2016 - 03:05 PM

As a veteran, I hope that all of our countries have learned not to waste the lives of our young people. Enough said!


I agree but I fear that is in vain with the new threats that we are all facing in today's turbulence times.
  • boyscout862, oldedeeres, toppop52 and 1 other said thanks

#7 oldedeeres OFFLINE  

oldedeeres
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 14008
  • 5,865 Thanks
  • 3,196 posts
  • Location: Rivers End, Saskatchewan

Posted April 24, 2016 - 03:17 PM

The first poem I ever wrote was as an exercise for Memorial Day when in grade five, 1954. Who even knew when we were nine years old what the world and war were about?

Never hope for war,
Or we'll be sadly sore,
With guns in Flanders Field,
Freedom they will shield.
  • MH81, KennyP, boyscout862 and 2 others have said thanks

#8 LilysDad ONLINE  

LilysDad

    Cat Lover

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 10443
  • 9,643 Thanks
  • 7,673 posts
  • Location: N. Illinois, DeKalb County

Posted April 24, 2016 - 04:03 PM

Wars as history are interesting. . .    BUT!    I go over to a gun forum where they are constantly posting jokes referring to the French as cowards and turncoats. Now I know there are very few men left who were actually there. Isn't it time we give this a rest? We musn't continue to paint the French and the British and the Germans, Japanese and all with broad strokes. Okay?   And yes I agree about the Australians,            they all eat a lot of shrimp.


  • oldedeeres, toppop52, holdenboy1960 and 1 other said thanks

#9 SupplySergeant ONLINE  

SupplySergeant

    Eggman's Dad

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Member No: 45293
  • 1,084 Thanks
  • 658 posts
  • Location: Harrodsburg, KY

Posted April 24, 2016 - 04:17 PM

I've served with RAAF and Canadian Army in two different theaters. US troops get along better with our fellow former colonials than we, or they, do with the English! I'll gladly raise a glass in remembrance of their fallen! 


  • boyscout862, oldedeeres, holdenboy1960 and 1 other said thanks

#10 toppop52 ONLINE  

toppop52
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 54420
  • 3,492 Thanks
  • 3,380 posts
  • Location: Lower Eastern Shore of Maryland

Posted April 24, 2016 - 04:28 PM

The French were far from cowards, the resistance is proof of that. The leaders at the time are another story. However, even the great leaders blundered, Ike, Churchill, Patton, Yamamoto, MacArthur, so none are perfect.
  • KennyP, boyscout862, oldedeeres and 2 others have said thanks

#11 Bolens800uk OFFLINE  

Bolens800uk
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 63893
  • 1,165 Thanks
  • 919 posts
  • Location: Devon, England

Posted April 24, 2016 - 04:31 PM

I've served with RAAF and Canadian Army in two different theaters. US troops get along better with our fellow former colonials than we, or they, do with the English! I'll gladly raise a glass in remembrance of their fallen!


Sad but unfortunately true. Having said that there was, I think, a grudging and mutual respect from all the Allieds front line soldiers from whatever Army they served under. I would also say there was friendly rivalry and ribaldry between the soldiers under extreme conditions. Certainly the RAF respected the USAAF daylight bombing raids on Germany. Whatever people views are, it's the ordinary bloke or Joe who get it in the neck, not the Top Brass.
  • boyscout862, oldedeeres, SupplySergeant and 1 other said thanks

#12 boyscout862 OFFLINE  

boyscout862
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 8923
  • 9,772 Thanks
  • 7,538 posts
  • Location: N.E. Connecticut

Posted April 24, 2016 - 05:52 PM

If you really study history, people are pretty much the same from country to country. There are extremeists everywhere. In wars we fight for the guys around us. Unfortunately, the leaders are very removed from reallity. I knew alot of WWI , WWII, Korea, and Vietnam Vets. In most cases, these US servicemen were victims of our leaders. WWI US troops could have been much better armed but our leaders were afraid that some might be captured so our guys were given old crap. Mac Arthur was arrogant and incompetent in WWII and Korea. Both times he decided that the asians would not dare to attack him. Both times he was wrong and hundreds of thousands died. Vietnam was led by Westmoreland who was basically a Mac Arthur clone. He was totally out of touch with reallity. I saw him get in an argument with a Vietnam Vet infantry Captain, in the mid eighties. Westy still didn't believe what the war in the field was like. All armies suffer from this. The good peace time leaders are often not good at war time leading. Just remember the that all veterans are victims. Good Luck, Rick

Edited by boyscout862, April 24, 2016 - 05:53 PM.

  • oldedeeres, holdenboy1960 and Bolens800uk have said thanks

#13 holdenboy1960 OFFLINE  

holdenboy1960
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 62113
  • 1,472 Thanks
  • 819 posts
  • Location: Queensland , Australia

Posted April 25, 2016 - 06:35 AM

Wars as history are interesting. . .    BUT!    I go over to a gun forum where they are constantly posting jokes referring to the French as cowards and turncoats. Now I know there are very few men left who were actually there. Isn't it time we give this a rest? We musn't continue to paint the French and the British and the Germans, Japanese and all with broad strokes. Okay?   And yes I agree about the Australians,            they all eat a lot of shrimp.

Shrimp hate that stuff , for goodness sakes , try crab or prawn thats it 


  • Bolens800uk said thank you

#14 LilysDad ONLINE  

LilysDad

    Cat Lover

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 10443
  • 9,643 Thanks
  • 7,673 posts
  • Location: N. Illinois, DeKalb County

Posted April 25, 2016 - 08:34 AM

Shrimp hate that stuff , for goodness sakes , try crab or prawn thats it 

How about yabbies? Is that the right word?


  • holdenboy1960 said thank you

#15 camdigger ONLINE  

camdigger
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 70250
  • 678 Thanks
  • 234 posts
  • Location: Central Alberta

Posted April 25, 2016 - 10:17 AM

It is very sobering to walk the beaches of Anzac cove and look up at the cliffs the invading troops were supposed to take.

The land assault followed a failed Naval assault a month earlier. I had the chance to visit most of the areas of both conflicts.

I will not forget......
  • MH81, oldedeeres, SupplySergeant and 2 others have said thanks




Top