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pricing vegetables


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#1 Greasy6020 ONLINE  

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Posted April 13, 2016 - 12:00 PM

I need a good place to start pricing vegetables for a contest I entered in, if I win I get $1500 canadian.

So in the past, my family has sold mixed vegetable baskets (1 bushel, 1.25 cubic feet) for $25. Is this reasonable to try selling to the public?

All input is very much appreciated!
Thanks!!

#2 skyrydr2 ONLINE  

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Posted April 13, 2016 - 01:03 PM

Sell your produce by the pound, but be sure you use a certified scale to measure with. Certified by your local Weights and Measures department. You can advertise " all natural" but not " organic " unless you are certified "organic" royal pain in the bumb! Go to the grocery store and see what they are charging for the same stuff you have, then price your stuff accordingly. If yours looks and tastes better, and you know is all natural , charge a pinch more, but don't gouge.. Someone will be on to you and give you a bad time.
One of the best advertising/ selling things you can do is free samples, if they like what they taste, they will buy a lot more. For instance, heirloom tomatoes, they may be ugly looking, but boy do they taste good!! i had a customer who kept eyeing them but said they looked ugly, i told him hold on, I'll show a big surprise, I took the ugliest one and cut it in half! He saw the inside and his eyes about popped out of his head with a smile from ear to ear, then I gave him a piece of it to taste, game over, he was hooked, he came back twice a week for those tomatoes, so be afraid to let them sample, it will sell .
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#3 Greasy6020 ONLINE  

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Posted April 13, 2016 - 01:12 PM

Sell your produce by the pound, but be sure you use a certified scale to measure with. Certified by your local Weights and Measures department. You can advertise " all natural" but not " organic " unless you are certified "organic" royal pain in the bumb! Go to the grocery store and see what they are charging for the same stuff you have, then price your stuff accordingly. If yours looks and tastes better, and you know is all natural , charge a pinch more, but don't gouge.. Someone will be on to you and give you a bad time.
One of the best advertising/ selling things you can do is free samples, if they like what they taste, they will buy a lot more. For instance, heirloom tomatoes, they may be ugly looking, but boy do they taste good!! i had a customer who kept eyeing them but said they looked ugly, i told him hold on, I'll show a big surprise, I took the ugliest one and cut it in half! He saw the inside and his eyes about popped out of his head with a smile from ear to ear, then I gave him a piece of it to taste, game over, he was hooked, he came back twice a week for those tomatoes, so be afraid to let them sample, it will sell .


What would a good price per pound be?

#4 crittersf1 OFFLINE  

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Posted April 13, 2016 - 02:59 PM

What is your local grocer charging per pound?



#5 Bill 76 ONLINE  

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Posted April 13, 2016 - 03:39 PM

Not the answer your looking for but funny

 

A few years ago I took a ride to get some fresh sweet corn and stopped by a young boy setting on the farm wagon of corn---I asked him how much a dozen ?

he looked at me like I was the dumbest person in the world and said   12           wife laughed at me all the way home  


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#6 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted April 13, 2016 - 04:17 PM

Pricing can vary so much from region to region, you will have to check locally.
For instance Sweet Corn goes for $6 a dozen in my area and I have seen others post $3.50 in theirs.
Chokes me up when I think of all I sold for 35 cents as a kid.
Skyrider2 is dead right, if your selling by the pound you must have a state certified scale.
In Iowa the fine would be high if you do not.
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#7 skyrydr2 ONLINE  

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Posted April 14, 2016 - 03:38 AM

What would a good price per pound be?


You need to go to your local market for this information, as prices vary depending on demand and supply, and what the market will bare.
So i really cant give you an answer to the question.

#8 Greasy6020 ONLINE  

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Posted April 14, 2016 - 09:24 AM

You need to go to your local market for this information, as prices vary depending on demand and supply, and what the market will bare.
So i really cant give you an answer to the question.


Ok... Well then that is my lunch break project...




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