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Making A Slotting Tool For A Small Metal Lathe To Make Or Repair Splines


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#1 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted April 08, 2016 - 05:16 PM

Been working on worn splines on the PTO shaft off of a Bolens 1050.  The shaft is 3/4" diameter and uses a 6 tooth spline to attach the slip joint onto it as well as where the drive pulley mounts.  The splines were worn where the pulley mounts so I welded the worn areas of the spline back up and turned them back down to the correct O.D.  I decided I would try and make a slotting tool to remove the metal in the groove area.  The idea will be to mount the shaft in the lathe and use the lathe chuck to index the shaft and the slotter will be mounted to the cross slide and hold a tool bit shaped to the correct profile and scrape the metal out of the grooved area by pushing the tool bit in a horizontal motion towards the head of the lathe parallel to the PTO shaft.  I had a worn out 30 tooth gear with a keyed 3/4" shaft "X" hub welded to the gear.  I ground the weld off and removed the hub from the gear which I am hoping will serve as an inexpensive barrel for the slotter shaft. The hub was stepped so I turned the step down in the lathe and then mounted the hub on the PTO shaft and locked it there with the set screws to finish turning the outside of the hub.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Splined Area Finish Turned.jpg
  • 2 Splined Area Rotated.jpg
  • 3 Splined Area Rotated.jpg
  • 4 Hub From Damaged Gear.jpg
  • 5 Hub Step Turned Down.jpg
  • 6 Hub Mounted On PTO Shaft To Finish Turning.jpg
  • 7 Hub Turned.jpg

Edited by 29 Chev, April 08, 2016 - 05:17 PM.

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#2 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted April 08, 2016 - 05:33 PM

Then I made and welded a threaded plate to the hub so that I can mount it to a slotted L bracket that fits on the cross slide of my little 6" Craftsman metal lathe that my dad bought back in the early 1960's for doing armature work on starters and generators.  I used a piece of 1" angle iron to centre the hub and space it out a little from the mounting plate and then added two pieces of flat steel for strength.  I then took a 5" piece of 3/4" PTO shaft that has the keyway already cut in it and flattened the one end and drilled a 1/4" hole in it that will serve to mount the handle on.  I am planning on tack welding a short piece of key stock inside the hub so that it will not turn as it moves inside the bore.  It is still cold here so I am only working on this a few hours at a time - hope to do some more to it this weekend.  This tool should let me clean up the splines in the shaft and hopefully cut new splines in the pulley hub after I bore and sleeve it. 

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Hub Mounted To Bracket.jpg
  • 2 Hub Welded To Brakcet.jpg
  • 3 Hub Welded To Bracket.jpg
  • 4 Keyed Shaft.jpg
  • 5 Keyed Shaft.jpg
  • 6 Keyed Shaft.jpg

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#3 chieffan ONLINE  

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Posted April 08, 2016 - 05:52 PM

Sounds like a ton of work.  Don't they make a set up for your lathe that will cut the splines on the PTO shaft?  Local welding shop has it on theirs and it is an OLD, I mean really OLD Lathe.  Be like cutting a key slot using the right width and an indexing set up.  Just thinking out loud.


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#4 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted April 08, 2016 - 06:41 PM

It is a bit of work but most of the materials will be relatively low cost.  I am not aware of an attachment for this small of a lathe.  The lathe was made by Atlas and sold through Sears under the Craftsman name - the 6" swing makes it a small lathe and while they did offer a number of attachments and plans to build things (like a gear cutter) I have never seen a spline cutter for this particular lathe - please correct me if I am wrong.  They did offer a milling vise that you could mount the shaft in and then use a gear cutter style of cutter to cut the splines but you would still have to figure out a way to index the shaft and also would require feeding the cross slide by hand.  I think this tool will be easier on me and the lathe and will also let me cut internal splines.  The proper way would be to buy a milling machine with a power feed bed but for the amount of splines I intend to repair or cut this should work fine. 


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#5 Bill 76 OFFLINE  

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Posted April 08, 2016 - 06:54 PM

I've seen in done very similar to how your doing it --a sharp cutter tool and very light cuts-- It will take some time but should work just fine.I would maybe use a small cut off wheel in a die grinder to remove some of the excess weld first.


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#6 CanadianHobbyFarmer OFFLINE  

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Posted April 08, 2016 - 07:51 PM

What you are doing is well beyond my abilities and I am impressed. I was wondering though, since you now have the tooling to cut splines, if it wouldn't be easier to to start with a new, undamaged piece of 3/4" shaft material and just make a new shaft from scratch.

 

Jim


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#7 skyrydr2 ONLINE  

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Posted April 09, 2016 - 03:17 AM

Pretty ambitious project for sure!! Pretty rough trying to get the spline pressure angles correct but can be done for sure!
Horizontal milling machine with an indexer and spline cutter is much faster and easier, but.. If you dont have one... What your doing will also work as long as the welds are not too hard.
My question is; does that little lathe allow you to use the power feed while the chuck is not turning ? Trying to broach in the splines by hand isn't going to be easy..??
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#8 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted April 09, 2016 - 10:06 AM

What you are doing is well beyond my abilities and I am impressed. I was wondering though, since you now have the tooling to cut splines, if it wouldn't be easier to to start with a new, undamaged piece of 3/4" shaft material and just make a new shaft from scratch.

 

Jim

Thanks - I will see how this works out first.  Since there are splines at both ends of the shaft it would take a lot longer to cut them all new than just clean out the damaged areas in my opinion.   

 

 

Pretty ambitious project for sure!! Pretty rough trying to get the spline pressure angles correct but can be done for sure!
Horizontal milling machine with an indexer and spline cutter is much faster and easier, but.. If you dont have one... What your doing will also work as long as the welds are not too hard.
My question is; does that little lathe allow you to use the power feed while the chuck is not turning ? Trying to broach in the splines by hand isn't going to be easy..??

 

No - the power feed for the carriage is driven off of the chuck spindle.  I have cut an internal spline on a coupling by mounting a bit sideways on the tool post moving the whole carriage but then you end up with a bit of movement from the clearance in the carriage to the bed combined with the clearance of the compound slide.  My hope is to lock the carriage to the bed which should eliminate any play other than what will be in the bore of the hub piece - time will tell.  


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#9 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted April 09, 2016 - 05:27 PM

Got a bit more done today.  Figured out the handle to move the shaft (I think) and drilled a 3/8" hole in the end of the shaft to mount the bit holder in and then drilled and threaded a hole for a 1/4" screw that will lock a piece of 3/8" round stock that will be the bit holder to hold a 3/16" bit (I hope). 

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Piston Retracted.jpg
  • 2 Hole For Bit Holder.jpg
  • 3 Half Way Position.jpg
  • 4 Piston Extended.jpg
  • 5 Piston Extended.jpg
  • 6 Start Of Bit Holder.jpg
  • 7 Rod For Bit Holder.jpg
  • 8 Screw To Lock Bit Holder.jpg

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#10 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted April 10, 2016 - 05:36 PM

Did some work on the bit holder.  I tightend the set srew in the collar to hold the shaft solid, mounted the piece of 3/8" round stock in the end of the shaft and then milled a 3/16 slot in the end.  Once I had the slot deep enough to hold the bit I did a couple of passes with a 1/4" end mill to widen the slot to 1/4" at the  open end.  The I clamped a nut on the end with a screw in it to centre the nut in the slot and welded the nut on the end.  I shaped a 3/16" tool bit to the shape of the spline and tried it out.  It did start to shape the groove in the spline but I found that the bit tended to hog in to the weld on several occasions.  I believe this is because the weld is hard and the bit is springing since it has no support at the cutting end.  I may try and figure out a way to provide support for the bit near the tip or I may mount the shaft in the milling attachment I have and try a 1/8" key seat cutter to see if it will clean out the groove where the weld is.  Since the spline is still good where I have not welded it I should be able to use it to index the shaft and line up the cutter.  Time will tell.

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Slot Milled.jpg
  • 2 Test Fit Of Tool Bit.jpg
  • 3 Nut Clamped To Be Welded.jpg
  • 4 Tool Bit Mounted.jpg
  • 5 Test On Welded Area.jpg

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#11 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted April 11, 2016 - 05:42 PM

I tried the 1/8" key seat cutter and it did a nice job of cleaning out the weld in the splines.  Once I had did a straight groove I cleaned up the sides of the grooves.  Here are some pictures of the key seat cutter doing the operation and the results.  I will probably try the slotter to cut the internal splines in the pulley that fits on the spline on the shaft and see if it will do a good job for that - the bit should not hog in as bad because it will not extend out very far for that operation. 

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1 Key Seat Cutter In Groove.jpg
  • 2 Key Seat Cutting Cleaning Weld From Groove.jpg
  • 3 Grooves Milled On Straight Pass.jpg
  • 4 Close Up Of Grooves.jpg
  • 5 Cleaning Up Side.jpg
  • 6 Cleaning Up Side.jpg
  • 7 Cleaning Up Side.jpg
  • 8 Finsihed Splines.jpg
  • 9 Finished Splines.jpg
  • 10 Finished Splines.jpg
  • 11 Finished Splines.jpg
  • 12 Finished Splines.jpg

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#12 skyrydr2 ONLINE  

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Posted April 13, 2016 - 03:47 AM

AWSOME JOB!!! You know, you can actually by cutters for that kind of work. But with out an indexer or rotary head it can get pretty tough getting the splines properly spaced. But for what you have , and what you accomplished that is AWSOME!!
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#13 holdenboy1960 OFFLINE  

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Posted June 13, 2016 - 05:39 AM

that tech is too far over my head , but sure does look good & i bet it works even better 

 

Shane



#14 MrMarty51 OFFLINE  

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Posted June 14, 2016 - 10:16 PM

Did a rear end rebuild job on My sons 01 Dodge Ram 1500. limited slip differential.

Needed a socket to reach in to adjust the side bearings of the ring gear carrier. Needing a bolt head that is 1-7/16ths to fit the adjuster ring, ground down the flats of a bolt with a 1-1/2 inch head. installed a washer to act as a stop and a jam nut, welded the jam nut onto a piece of pipe 36" long, welded a cracked socket to the other end for a drive. Adjustment of the back lash and torque the carrier adjusters was a breeze with this device.

IMG_2534.jpg

 

OK then, the clutch packs on the side gears needs to be compressed in order to get the spider gears installed. Tried several different things, the Son, He made this. a 1/2" bolt, sawed off to 3/4" long, a nut sawed ground down to 1/2 thick, another nut so that the total length was not over 3/4" long.

He held the side gears and clutches in place, I shoved in the axle shafts, He installed the C clips, shoved the axle shafts out to engage the C clips int the side gears. held the bolt into position between the axles, screwed out wards the full width nut to compress the clutch packs. The differential/spider gears pin then is used, shoving it into its hole but not too far, used a big prybar between lug studs of the axle to rotate the spider gears into position. Other than the amount of muscle and force it rakes to make the axles rotate, tis also worked very well. The spreader tool

IMG_2536.jpg


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