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Horse Manure disposal


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#1 Chucktin OFFLINE  

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Posted March 28, 2016 - 08:16 AM

DW has 2 mini horses. They don't "do" much but we are still left with disposal. Neighbor will allow us to spread it on their acre unused lot.
I'm thinking a GT with a light Rake and a Rototiller. Spread it out and grind it in.
Neighbor gets smooth and improved garden, I get a new toy and seat time.

Question: Should I be concerned with cleaning the Tines on a regular basis, isn't manure caustic enough that I should be keeping after the equipment more?
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#2 olcowhand OFFLINE  

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Posted March 28, 2016 - 08:26 AM

Horse manure won't eat up your equipment like watery cow manure will.  With the tilling into dirt, you should be fine.


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#3 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted March 28, 2016 - 09:35 AM

Welcome to GTT. That is a very generous offer that you are making to your neighbor. Before promising the tilling you should check the soil for rocks, roots, and clay. Any of them can make virgin ground very tough. You may want to use a plow to bust the soil first. A couple of years of manure and tilling made my garden very rich. Two inches of manure tilled into the ground will make rich soil. Too bad that you can't do it for your own land, like a portion of the pasture. Seat time is good time. Good Luck, Rick


Edited by boyscout862, March 28, 2016 - 09:35 AM.

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#4 chieffan ONLINE  

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Posted March 28, 2016 - 09:52 AM

Can you do the clean up in the fall?  Then just spread it out on your neighbors and let mother nature take care of it from there.  Just don't spread it to thick.  How do you intend to spread it?  Can be done by had but takes some work.  I did that for a few years till we got the big horses, then went to a spreader.  I don't think a rake will help you much but don't know what kind of rake your talking about.  Pulling an old section of a harrow would help break it up and spread it some.  Good luck with your disposal project.



#5 oldedeeres ONLINE  

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Posted March 28, 2016 - 11:47 AM

The harrow is a good idea. I hook one section of flexible harrow behind the STX38 and have fun. Spreads everything in a neat, thin layer that the rain can settle and the grass grow up through. If you plan on working it up later it incorporates much more easily and doesn't want to plug the next implement up. The harrow also works to bring the gravel back up on my road.
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#6 olcowhand OFFLINE  

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Posted March 28, 2016 - 11:53 AM

You could also chain several old car tires together to use as a drag.  It would break up the horse poo & spread it well.


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#7 KC9KAS OFFLINE  

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Posted March 28, 2016 - 06:26 PM

:welcometogttalk:

I have heard that horse manure isn't good for a garden when it is "fresh". I think it needs to lay and decompose for 2 to 3 years before using it.

Not sure what it will do on a lawn before it is somewhat decomposed.


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#8 LilysDad OFFLINE  

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Posted March 28, 2016 - 07:02 PM

I used horse poop on the garden once. The horse had been eating timothy hay and the seeds went right through him. I have timothy growing in my garden to this day. I believe composting it would kill the seeds if it gets hot enough.


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#9 chieffan ONLINE  

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Posted March 28, 2016 - 07:30 PM

I used horse poop on the garden once. The horse had been eating timothy hay and the seeds went right through him. I have timothy growing in my garden to this day. I believe composting it would kill the seeds if it gets hot enough.

We feed out goats Alfalfa/grass mix during the winter.  Put the manure on the garden in the fall, plow it in.  Let the first round of grass and weeds come up in the spring and hit it with roundup.  Then put the garden in and when crops are up use Preen.  Works good if conditions are favorable.  Last year with all the rain we had nothing was favorable.



#10 lyall ONLINE  

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Posted March 28, 2016 - 08:11 PM

horse manure compost is great for asparagus.

dig a hole over 3 feet deep and the length you want.  And fill it with the horse manure compost,

you will get more than you want of asparagus.



#11 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted March 30, 2016 - 06:36 AM

horse manure compost is great for asparagus.
dig a hole over 3 feet deep and the length you want.  And fill it with the horse manure compost,
you will get more than you want of asparagus.

And then plant asparagus in it?

#12 lyall ONLINE  

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Posted March 30, 2016 - 08:04 PM

Yeah - forgot to say to plant the asparagus last in the compost.


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#13 Sawdust OFFLINE  

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Posted March 30, 2016 - 08:09 PM

Now that asparagus would give you some Getty up & go. Lol
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#14 shorty ONLINE  

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Posted March 31, 2016 - 04:19 AM

Good for the peas but not for the potatoes.
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#15 JBRamsey OFFLINE  

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Posted April 14, 2016 - 08:29 PM

I won't use horse manure for the same reason as LilysDad--seeds don't digest and you fill your garden with all kinds of weeds. And I don't use RoundUp anywhere near my garden. That stuff goes into the soil via the weeds and I don't know how long it takes to decompose and become inert.




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