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Early Style Standard w Electric Start


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#1 Rustysteele OFFLINE  

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Posted March 14, 2016 - 06:36 PM

I just finished reading the LONG post on Standard tractors, I wasn`t sure if I had posted mine yet, so here it is! I picked it up at a show about 20 years ago, it was a lot of money, but I knew if I didn`t take it home, I`d regret it. It is the early open-flywheel style with the friction drive cooling blower, which makes it a nice tractor as it is, but it has what I believe to be a factory electric start on it. It has very little use, according to the serial number I`ve been told it`s a 1934, but the tractor itself is probably from the mid-1920`s. I think, now this is only my opinion so let`s not have any arguing here, that in 1934 Standard wanted to try electric starting on their tractors, since at that time farm tractors were getting into electric starting. they took this old unsold tractor that was too outdated to sell, and converted it to electric start, just to see if it was feasible. The battery brackets and other pieces that were added are all very well made and riveted together, a farmer or blacksmith would never had taken that much trouble to do that, the support bracket for the hand-crank handle is gone, and has original paint where it would have gone to show that it was never sold with the hand start on it. The 1934 date is also too late for this tractor, unless it was sold then as I described. The wheels are also smaller than other Standards, almost like Waish wheels maybe? The biggest drawback to it is the absence of a charging system and tha fact that the ignition system uses the battery also, so if it stalls on you way out in the back 40 late in the day, the battery may not be strong enough to start it, and without the crank handle support, it would never be started by hand, i`ve tried it and it won`t work!

To start it, you hold the lever hooked to the hinged starter motor, hold down the compression release on the intake, push the starter button and tighten the starter belt, once it starts, loosen the motor and use the wooden rod on the handle to pop the belt off. Now you are ready to go to work! I hope to get it going and bring it to a couple shows this year and get other people`s ideas on it. I had it on Ebay years ago, and got into an argument with someone who claimed to know all about Standards, and since he never saw anything about electric start, they never did that at the factory. I`d love to hear what everyone here has to say about it, but remember that I really don`t know the history behind it, but no one else does either, but if someone did, please let me know! More picts to follow....

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#2 Rustysteele OFFLINE  

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Posted March 14, 2016 - 06:39 PM

More pictures.

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#3 chieffan ONLINE  

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Posted March 14, 2016 - 07:46 PM

That is a neat looking old 2 wheel GT.  I would not to a lot to it to get it ready for an y show.  Tractors don't have to be pretty to go over good at a show.


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#4 Rustysteele OFFLINE  

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Posted March 15, 2016 - 07:33 AM

I had it running years ago, so it shouldn`t take much to get it going. The hardest part now is finding the time to play with this stuff!



#5 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted March 15, 2016 - 07:38 AM

We are in Southern New England. The skill and ability of many of the old toolmakers is extraordinary. Just because something looks real good doesn't make it factory made. Remember, there had to be someone at the factory to make the tools and prototypes in the first place. Many of my older friends worked at P&W and Colt. Their skills and patience are amazing. Several have their own machine shops in their basements.

I was rebuilding a Troybuilt tiller for a friend. Another mutual friend came by and saw that the main shaft was badly gouged. I was going to order a new one. Dave grabbed it and said that he would fix it. It came back a couple of days later, looking like new. He'd welded it up and remachined it on his Southbend.

I think that a factory engineer would have put in a charging system. Therefore, I think that it is something that was pieced together at home by a factory worker. The parts could have been "seconds" taken from a scrap pile. I've seem some pretty neat things that were put together from parts salvaged at the scrap yard used by P&W.

Whether it is factory or not, it is still very kool! Good Luck, Rick
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#6 Mike Unwin OFFLINE  

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Posted March 15, 2016 - 08:05 AM

I don,t know anything about but the some old outboard motors were dead loss systems no charging ,I keep a little solar panel on the old Bolen 1220 just to keep the battery maintained.Cheers Mike


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#7 LilysDad OFFLINE  

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Posted March 15, 2016 - 08:28 AM

I've heard some stories about a Standard that was prepped for a land speed record attempt. The only thing holding it back was the operator.

(I'm impressed with your machine!)


Edited by LilysDad, March 15, 2016 - 08:28 AM.

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#8 Rustysteele OFFLINE  

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Posted March 15, 2016 - 03:11 PM

The one thing that makes me think it`s a factory conversion is the nameplate. The serial number is supposed to match up with 1934, and they stopped making this in the late 1920`s. A person doing this at home wouldn`t go to Standard for a new nameplate. I welcome ideas about this, but I still think it`s a factory conversion, but without any solid proof, it`s a little hard to say.



#9 DougT ONLINE  

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Posted March 15, 2016 - 04:42 PM

I wouldn't agree with the serial number being 1934. There has never been any sure way to date the early numbers. There are later Standards that are still pre Monarch that have numbers in the 9000 range. When they got to the Monarch designation, they were into 5 digit numbers. The change to the Monarch designation happened in the 34-35 range.

 

If you go back to the first post in the Standard thread, you will see these same wheels in the tractor pictured. This is only the second tractor I've seen with these style wheels. I'm fairly sure the wheels are the plow wheel for the 2nd gen Kinkade that the engine is used from. They are identical to the model K Kinkade plow wheel with the exception of the drive. Notice how the rachet pawl is on the wheel and the cog is on the separate piece fastened to the axle. On all the other Standards the cog is made on the wheel and the pawl is fastened to the axle. I haven't found anyone with a second gen plow set up to compare. Even the ones with the tall wheels don't have this set up, they are more like the later ones.

 

Have you ever tried researching the numbers on the starter? I wonder if that would tell us anything?


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#10 Rustysteele OFFLINE  

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Posted March 16, 2016 - 06:56 AM

Thanks for the input Doug! Back when I had it on Ebay, someone messaged me that the serial number put it from 1934, This is the only Standard I have left so I don`t have any to do a number comparison with, i`m glad you do.

I knew that the wheels looked familiar, now I know why! A couple years I started researching the numbers on the starter, but then it got busy here and never finished. That`s definitely something to look into, at least it will give us a year for the starter parts.

there`s a good chance now that it could be home-made, but I still have trouble thinking that a farmer or blacksmith would take such pains to make it look so professional, and use rivets instead of bolts to hold the battery framework together. It all boils down to a really neat tractor, no matter who added the starter! I`ll let you guys know what I come up with on the starter numbers.



#11 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted March 16, 2016 - 08:58 AM

Thanks for the input Doug! Back when I had it on Ebay, someone messaged me that the serial number put it from 1934, This is the only Standard I have left so I don`t have any to do a number comparison with, i`m glad you do.

I knew that the wheels looked familiar, now I know why! A couple years I started researching the numbers on the starter, but then it got busy here and never finished. That`s definitely something to look into, at least it will give us a year for the starter parts.

there`s a good chance now that it could be home-made, but I still have trouble thinking that a farmer or blacksmith would take such pains to make it look so professional, and use rivets instead of bolts to hold the battery framework together. It all boils down to a really neat tractor, no matter who added the starter! I`ll let you guys know what I come up with on the starter numbers.

Rivets are what blacksmiths use. They were cheaper than bolts. They can be heated and formed in the forge. Use them to connect when they are red hot. When they cool, they shrink and pull the connection together real tight. My first forge is a "rivet forge" and was designed to be used on construction sites.

 

1934 was in the heart of the Depression. Most farmers were lacking any cash so, pennys were pinched everywhere. During WWII, there were shortages of everything. Maybe this was several machines salvaged together to make one. Again, I would suspect a worker from that factory. It gets more interesting the more we think about it. Good Luck, Rick


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#12 Rustysteele OFFLINE  

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Posted March 16, 2016 - 04:24 PM

If anyone in the New England area wants to check it out, I`ll have it at the Belltown engine show in East Hampton, CT at the end of April. It might even be running! Thanks for all the comments everybody!


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#13 Rustysteele OFFLINE  

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Posted March 16, 2016 - 05:52 PM

I checked the numbers on the starter, it`s a Delco-Remy Model 738G, Serial # 391982. I have an old Delco-Remy book here somewhere, but of course I can`t find it now! I did an internet search, and all I could find is that it was made for 1935-6 Chevrolets, but mine is without the Bendix and a different nosecone. I`ll have to take a close look at it and see if the nosecone on mine is just the broken off automotive one or ??? Does anyone here have access to something that might give more info on it?



#14 Clifford Bridgford ONLINE  

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Posted March 18, 2016 - 02:05 PM

Bill,

          I have a Standard pre-Monarch that is in real nice original condition.  The serial number is 42371. As far as electric starting systems without a charging system go, we have to remember that the factory starting system on a Gravely Tee Head engine had no charging system, and they used this through 1976.

 

Cliff


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#15 Rustysteele OFFLINE  

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Posted March 18, 2016 - 02:33 PM

Thanks Cliff! That would put the serial number back into the mid 1920`s possibly. I think this is one mystery that will never be solved. Whether it`s factory or farm made, it really doesn`t matter, it`s a neat machine and that`s what matters! You might see it at Zagrays this July Cliff!






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