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Ford Lament


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#31 Cat385B ONLINE  

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Posted March 15, 2016 - 07:14 PM

Now I have to go find 3 guys with nothing better to do.

 

Don, Gary, and Marty.

 

You're welcome.


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#32 toomanytoys84 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 15, 2016 - 07:55 PM

I got the bolts this morning. A Milwaukee 7" angle grinder made very short work of it. I ordered new bolts from NAPA, $66. Now I have to go find 3 guys with nothing better to do.

There you go. Only way to do it!

I replaced mine with Allen head bolts and big washers. They stuck up off the floor but at least I could get them back out!

Anti seize the crap outta them things.

Edited by toomanytoys84, March 15, 2016 - 07:55 PM.


#33 TAHOE OFFLINE  

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Posted March 16, 2016 - 07:35 AM

I run into this all the time at work and I just weld big nuts to the top of the bolt and they come right out, the heat from welding helps loosen things up. I've probably broken about 50 of those torx bits over the years but snap on keeps replacing it.

 

Funny, I have to do the same thing on my old 84 Chevy short box. Trying to remove the bed, they have the smooth top toggle type bolts, just spinning in the bed. they are pretty rusted on there after 32 yrs. Gonna weld some nuts on top and go from there. If that doesn't work, out comes the grinder.

I'll lift my bed up and off with my engine hoist and some 2x4's

 

Don, Gary, and Marty.

 

You're welcome.

 

OOOHHH NOOOO, I am not voluntarily working on anyone else's Ford



#34 LilysDad OFFLINE  

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Posted March 16, 2016 - 08:07 AM


 

Maybe if I wasn't so slow I would quit filling my tanks ! :rolling:

 

When the pump went out , we had gas prices dropping like snowflakes and I was filling the tank every time I passed a station. Now, prices are back up and I'll run it on fumes.



#35 Username OFFLINE  

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Posted March 16, 2016 - 12:31 PM

 

 

 

Your angle grinder would have lit up a gas leak as quickly as a torch would. 

 

 

 

I'm not so sure about that.I had a friend who would cut rusted gas lines with a cut off wheel while gas was running out and it never ignited.He done this many times and sparks flew every time.

 

I just dumped a little gasoline on my concrete floor and tried to ignite it with sparks from a grinder and it would not ignite.Not saying that it would or could not happen but that it did not happen in my experiences but I would never recommend anyone else trying it.


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#36 David Brown OFFLINE  

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Posted March 16, 2016 - 12:48 PM

I'm not so sure about that.I had a friend who would cut rusted gas lines with a cut off wheel while gas was running out and it never ignited.He done this many times and sparks flew every time.

 

I just dumped a little gasoline on my concrete floor and tried to ignite it with sparks from a grinder and it would not ignite.Not saying that it would or could not happen but that it did not happen in my experiences but I would never recommend anyone else trying it.

I think I am safe in saying your gas didn't ignite because I wasn't the one using the grinder.


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#37 Username OFFLINE  

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Posted March 16, 2016 - 12:58 PM

I think I am safe in saying your gas didn't ignite because I wasn't the one using the grinder.

 

I always thought your hair loss happened naturally.


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#38 CanadianHobbyFarmer OFFLINE  

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Posted March 16, 2016 - 01:12 PM

I'm not so sure about that.I had a friend who would cut rusted gas lines with a cut off wheel while gas was running out and it never ignited.He done this many times and sparks flew every time.

 

I just dumped a little gasoline on my concrete floor and tried to ignite it with sparks from a grinder and it would not ignite.Not saying that it would or could not happen but that it did not happen in my experiences but I would never recommend anyone else trying it.

 

I'm surprised to hear that.  I may give it a try this weekend just to see (gas on the floor, not chopping gas lines). I saw a guy set his jeans  on fire using a quick cut saw to cut a steel I beam (seriously).

 

Jim


Edited by CanadianHobbyFarmer, March 16, 2016 - 01:12 PM.

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#39 Username OFFLINE  

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Posted March 16, 2016 - 01:20 PM

I'm surprised to hear that.  I may give it a try this weekend just to see (gas on the floor, not chopping gas lines). I saw a guy set his jeans  on fire using a quick cut saw to cut a steel I beam (seriously).

 

Jim

 

I just soaked a paper towel with gas and ground on a piece of steel an inch away and could not ignite it.



#40 Jazz OFFLINE  

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Posted March 16, 2016 - 01:24 PM

Did any of you ever find a gas leak while doing all of that heating under there?

 

I got the bolts this morning. A Milwaukee 7" angle grinder made very short work of it. I ordered new bolts from NAPA, $66. Now I have to go find 3 guys with nothing better to do.

Heat the bolt head from topside and let bolt cool then turn it out. I do recall one would not let go and we cut the head off with torch from topside. Usually a weld bolt in frame,,no nuts to speak of



#41 Username OFFLINE  

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Posted March 16, 2016 - 01:28 PM

Found this info:

 

To ignite petrol, the following three conditions must all be satisfied.

There must be combustible material present in the flammable range. For liquid fuels, the liquid itself will not burn but the vapours will if their concentration, when mixed with oxygen from the air, is within the flammable range. In the case of petrol, a flammable vapour heavier than air forms over the surface of the liquid at room temperature, therefore this condition is easily met. Dried grass, paper, and flaking paint would allow the transport of petrol by capillary action, significantly increasing the surface area of the petrol and decreasing the localized volume of petrol. This works just like a candle wick and leads to more evaporation compared to the same liquid volume in a “pool” with no wicking. This decreases the energy required to ignite the petrol (i.e. makes it easier to ignite). The wicking material can also be an intermediate source of ignition.

There must be an ignition source present. Sparks are a source of ignition, but there are different kinds of sparks. An angle grinder produces mechanical sparks comprising hot metal fragments burning as they move through the air, quickly cooling and forming a layer of ash on their surface as they travel. So even though the piece of metal must be approximately 500 – 1000 degree Celsius to look red, the mass of metal is very small and the total energy it can impart is small. Whereas a rod of metal heated to a red colour with an oxy-acetylene torch would have sufficient energy to ignite petrol - This is not advised. Electrical sparks involve a discharge of electrical current through air. The localized energy (and temperature, for example 1000s of degrees for a spark plug) produced by an electrical discharge is much higher than that from a hot metal fragment.

Thirdly, the ignition source must have sufficient energy to raise the temperature of the fuel at some localized point to higher than the fuel ignition temperature. The minimum ignition temperature of petrol vapour is about 280 degree Celsius. Established flames, electrical sparks (or static) or even the very small hot sparks generated by flint on steel produce localised temperatures higher than this and therefore ignition readily occurs. Grinder sparks comprising metal fragments flying through the air can sometimes ignite flammable vapour directly but its much harder. However the ash flakes may be hot enough and large enough to ignite dried grass etc, producing a small flame that then easily ignites the petrol vapours.



#42 David Brown OFFLINE  

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Posted March 16, 2016 - 03:32 PM

I always thought your hair loss happened naturally.

No the hair loss happened because I raised two girls, both of which had to see how many pony tails they could give daddy while stretching his scalp and face to the limits.  I still think they have my hair in a plastic bag somewhere.


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#43 toomanytoys84 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 16, 2016 - 08:55 PM

In my late teens I was working on a fuel pump in a canister. I had it in a coffee can of gas and had a 12 volt battery with test leads hooked to the pump. I'm standing there with this set up smoking a cigarette and as I'm jiggling the lead the pump kicks in sprays me in the face putting out my cigarette.

I wasn't all that smart at 19...

The vapor with gas is what gets you

#44 Cat385B ONLINE  

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Posted March 16, 2016 - 09:03 PM

Funny, I have to do the same thing on my old 84 Chevy short box. Trying to remove the bed, they have the smooth top toggle type bolts, just spinning in the bed. they are pretty rusted on there after 32 yrs. Gonna weld some nuts on top and go from there. If that doesn't work, out comes the grinder.

I'll lift my bed up and off with my engine hoist and some 2x4's

 

 

OOOHHH NOOOO, I am not voluntarily working on anyone else's Ford

 

But you have experience in the matter........

 

 

78bronco.jpg



#45 dodge trucker OFFLINE  

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Posted March 16, 2016 - 09:16 PM

I'm surprised to hear that.  I may give it a try this weekend just to see (gas on the floor, not chopping gas lines). I saw a guy set his jeans  on fire using a quick cut saw to cut a steel I beam (seriously).

 

Jim

I caught my quilt lined heavy flannel shirt on fire once, while I was grinding on a steel plate with a hand held 7" electric grinder.

and no, it did not have any flammable liquid on it either.






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