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How far is too far on a restoration


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#16 Marty'70 ONLINE  

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Posted March 10, 2016 - 07:01 PM

Nothing wrong with a rattle can paint job if it is done right.   Use a quality brand of primer and paint.  I like to use the same brand for each.  Have had real good luck with X-o-Rust.  Take your time, several thin coats and follow directions. 
 
Rattle can paint is not as durable as automotive paint so don't expect it to stay bright and shiny if it sits out in the weather all the time.  You can always do a first class paint job later on if your not happy with the rattle can job

 

It is possible to do an excellent job with rattle cans. You will pay quite a bit for them. Preparation is key! Crap paint will look ten times better with meticulous body work. Practice on the mower and get good on the show tractor.

 

I do what I can myself.But I'm slow at it.I make them 100% mechanically sound 1st then use them for a bit and work the kinks out before tearing them apart for paint and body work.
 
 
If you really plan on keeping it then look into Powder coating.It will outlast any grade of car paint.Betting it will be cheaper than $500 to but there is a alot more Prep work that you will have to do.You can't just tape off stuff that you don't want painted.You have to completely disassemble it down to the bare frame.Rubber and plastic parts can't be powder coated.
 
If you decide to paint it yourself make sure you have a Huge well ventilated indoor space you can lay the all of the parts out on for atleast a couple weeks.
 
Wonder if that $500 includes taking it completely apart,painting and reassembling it?Or will he just tape it up and shoot it?Price Seems a really high for a quart of paint,thinner,primer and clear coat if he's not going to take it apart and paint.


500 is a reasonable price for that. My daughter hit a deer and I had to replace a fender and bumper cover. Asked local body shop and was quoted 400. And that was me bringing the panel's down to them to refinish and take home to install..
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#17 TomLGT195 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 10, 2016 - 07:14 PM

Do what you feel comfortable with. It's your tractor and you have to live with what it turns out like.

I would do one yourself first and see if you're satisfied with how it comes out. (Obviously the daily worker.) Then decide how to do the second one, yourself or have professional help. That's my 2 cents worth.


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#18 jabelman ONLINE  

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Posted March 10, 2016 - 07:32 PM

when I started restoring one of my goals which I still am lucky to do was I have to do it all myself. for me it's the learning, research, challenge and the satisfaction of saying I did everything myself. I learned from my mistakes I also have a great network of friends who ask and watched over the years.
as per the rattle cans I prefer them for me I can paint small amounts, no clean up. I also use good prime. I don't have any issues with it the paint holds up just fine with 2 kids bouncing and playing on them
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#19 HALFSCALE OFFLINE  

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Posted March 11, 2016 - 03:47 AM

You picked a rough color tractor to restore, red is one of the most expensive colors to spray, even in a low grade automotive or industrial paint. If you do decide to go with spray bombs, one trick that will get it to lay out better is use a new can for each coat

spray cans use propane as a propellant  and the pressure really falls off after a few minutes of use, so by using new cans it will lay out better, then use what's left in the cans for small parts or chassis stuff  that you may not be as fussy about.


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#20 Kmac1 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 23, 2016 - 08:51 PM

Thanks for each and every reply. There are other GT forums (or so I've heard) then there is GTTalk, which is by far the best place on the web to ask a question. It's like picking up the phone and calling your neighbor, your friend or family. Right now my Snapper is on a roll around cart on jack stands tore down to the frame and rear differential. There are countless plastic baggies filled with nuts, bolts, washers, pins and misc parts lieing on the cart labeled with name of where they were taken from. So the nut and bolt restoration is my goal.

Do what you feel comfortable with. It's your tractor and you have to live with what it turns out like.
I would do one yourself first and see if you're satisfied with how it comes out. (Obviously the daily worker.) Then decide how to do the second one, yourself or have professional help. That's my 2 cents worth.

.

I like the idea of doing one the best that I can do and however it turns out I can say I did it. My last restoration took 7 years. The small details really shine when it's all done. Thanks again for all the replies. Family
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#21 Kmac1 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 23, 2016 - 09:00 PM

You may be asking the wrong people... Just saying... You may want to ask your wife... of course you can offer the the somewhat weak , but still an explanation, that the Forum guys said to go for it...
Seriously what do YOU want, what are your use for them and what are you comfortable with? There are a lot of pretty nice looking tractors their owners took a rattle can to , yes there are drawbacks to painting with aerosol, but it is the easiest DYI.


My wife is pretty awesome, and when I read this to her she laughed and said he is right you should ask first and he is right so go for it.

#22 larrybl ONLINE  

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Posted March 23, 2016 - 09:26 PM

I have two Snapper 1855A's that I am restoring as time allows, (2 years so far). I plan on using one to mow with and the other one to show with. I have some dents on both fender pans, hoods and grills. How far is to far on a garden tractor restoration. I am not a body man (I tried on some of the smaller dings, not pretty) so I took them to a body an I used to work with and he quoted me $200 per panel. I declined his offer to steal my hard earned $$$$$$. I only have $100 in both tractors. So I called my painter and he said he would do it and paint them for paint price only which is $500 for the entire time reactor, all panels, frame and wheels. It sounds a little high to me but he is the number one painter in Oklahoma City metro and when he is done it will be flawless. Should I spend the $500 or try to do it myself.

Two years seams like a long time. With two tractors that are the same (I have been there too) I would take the best parts, Engine, Deck, etc and use those for the show machine. Depending on which is needed first, Mow or Show, I would start with one.... Probably the Mow, and practice the body work and paint on it to see what works and what doesn't. If parts need ordered like carb kits, gaskets etc, order two sets. One at a time, practice on the first one and learn from it, then do the show. That is how I would do it. 


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#23 SC Farmer OFFLINE  

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Posted May 04, 2016 - 07:51 PM

Um, lots of comments above, all of them are, no doubt, the right aswer for each respective author.  Soooo, I'll add my comments.  

 

I bought a '51 Farmall Cub in pretty good mechanical shape two yeas ago.  I began disassembling it piece by piece, cleaning each piece and stripping all the metal parts (at least 90+ % of them) using a Dewalt drill and a stripping wheel.  I then cleaned the parts again, primed them and painted them with good quality paint in  (IH paint) Farmall Red. in a rattle can.  I used a LOT of rattle cans.  I did the wheels, tin, and all other parts separately.  I did not paint over bolt heads, rubber, screws, or other joints on the tractor, and it showed.  This took me approximately three months.  I use the tractor to cultivate a small three acre "farm" and house the tractor inside, out of the rain and sun.. I have too much time and busted knuckles to let the weather take its toll on it.  It came out pretty good.  I'm now doing the same to a Bolens 1886 and a Cub Cadet 106 and have plans to do it to a Bolens 1253 in the fall.  Rattle cans work fine, but like anything, its not in the painting (well, some...), it's in the PREPARATION!  

 

Good luck - its a fun and rewarding hobby.


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#24 olds45512 ONLINE  

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Posted May 05, 2016 - 07:30 AM

As a professional bodyman I can tell you that $500 sounds like a gift if he's doing a nice job. Paint materials are through the roof and gone are the days where you can get a whole car painted for $500, like I said if he's doing a nice job he's probably not making any money doing it for $500 but if he's going to take shortcuts and do a hack job then its a bit steep.

Edited by olds45512, May 05, 2016 - 08:21 AM.

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#25 dualresponse1731 OFFLINE  

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Posted June 16, 2016 - 08:58 PM

You picked a rough color tractor to restore, red is one of the most expensive colors to spray, even in a low grade automotive or industrial paint. If you do decide to go with spray bombs, one trick that will get it to lay out better is use a new can for each coat

spray cans use propane as a propellant  and the pressure really falls off after a few minutes of use, so by using new cans it will lay out better, then use what's left in the cans for small parts or chassis stuff  that you may not be as fussy about.

This is good and timely info as it back up EXACTLY what I was thinking tonight. I'm painting my tractor right now and just had this thought today. The new cans really do lay out a useable pattern, but when it loses it's pressure, it goes belly up.

Use the fresh cans on parts that matter. Use the 1/2 used cans for everything else!


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#26 larrybl ONLINE  

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Posted June 16, 2016 - 09:20 PM

Rattle can here. I stick to these rules.

Try to paint with Humidity around 30 or so, Temp around 70+ and wind less than 15

Otherwise bring the parts in the AC conditioned shop.

Fast dry - Apply 1 Coat, wait 1/2 hour and turn and do the other side. repeat 3-4 times

Premium - Apply 1 light coat wait  6-12 hours and turn and do the other side. repeat 2 to 3 times.

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Edited by larrybl, June 16, 2016 - 09:20 PM.

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